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  • Memorial Sloan-Kettering | Newswire
    2014 Science News Researchers discover unusual genetic mutation linked to adolescent liver cancer In the race for better treatments and possible cures rare diseases are often left behind In a collaboration of researchers at The Rockefeller University Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and the New York Genome Center an unusual mutation has been found that is strongly linked to one such disease a rare liver cancer that affects teens and

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/memorial-sloan-kettering/ (2016-02-13)
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  • New York Genome Center | Newswire
    of Sciences February 28 2014 Science News Researchers discover unusual genetic mutation linked to adolescent liver cancer In the race for better treatments and possible cures rare diseases are often left behind In a collaboration of researchers at The Rockefeller University Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and the New York Genome Center an unusual mutation has been found that is strongly linked to one such disease a rare liver cancer

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/new-york-genome-center/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Sandy Simon | Newswire
    Simon April 18 2011 Science News Polarized microscopy technique shows new details of how proteins are arranged A key component of the nuclear pore complex a Y shaped cluster of proteins that helps determine what gets in and what stays out of a cell s nucleus was first photographed and modeled at Rockefeller in 2009 But fundamental questions about how the structures were aligned in relation to the rest of

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/sandy-simon/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Starr collaboration illuminates mysterious pathway to immortality in cancer cells | Newswire
    column were not irradiated the center column shows DNA damage one hour after irradiation With support from the Starr Cancer Consortium a team of scientists from The Rockefeller University The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medical College set out to demystify ALT The team carried out a detailed analysis of a large panel of ALT cell lines for their genetic and cell biological features How ALT is activated was not known but recent data pointed the finger at an enzyme called ATRX ATRX changes the way DNA wraps around proteins in chromosomes In an article published online July 19 in PLoS Genetics the team shows that loss of ATRX is a common event in the genesis of ALT lines They also show that ALT cell lines frequently undergo chromosomal changes and are impaired in their ability to detect and repair damage in their DNA These hallmarks of ALT are expected to help the detection of ALT type tumors in the clinic and may lead to ALT specific treatments says Titia de Lange Leon Hess Professor and head of the Laboratory of Cell Biology and Genetics at Rockefeller University team leader and co author of the paper They may also help explain differential survival benefit of ALT tumors This work represents a remarkable collaborative effort among five laboratories at four different institutions says John Petrini a member of Memorial Sloan Kettering s Molecular Biology Program team member and co author of the paper Each of us brought our specific expertise to bear on this intriguing and important problem It exemplifies the power of collaboration says William Hahn a senior associate member of the Broad Institute team member and co author of the paper More information about the Starr Cancer Consortium can be

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2012/07/24/starr-collaboration-illuminates-mysterious-pathway-to-immortality-in-cancer-cells/ (2016-02-13)
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  • In cancer, molecular signals that recruit blood vessels also trigger metastasis | Newswire
    to recruit blood vessel cells they send out multiple signals that cause endothelial cells to arrive at the incipient metastatic site says the study s senior author Sohail Tavazoie head of the Elizabeth and Vincent Meyer Laboratory of Systems Cancer Biology Our new work shows that a microRNA known as miR 126 blocks metastasis by suppressing several genes that promote this process These genes both increase blood vessels and trigger metastasis MiR 126 is one of three microRNAs that Tavazoie and his colleagues had previously identified as being linked to breast cancer metastasis In work he published in 2008 Tavazoie established that miR 126 acts as a metastasis suppressor in mice and found that breast cancer patients whose tumors contained very low levels of miR 126 had a much higher likelihood of having their cancer spread than did patients with higher levels of miR 126 The new work suggests that blood vessel cells are a major reason why Working with human tumor cells in vitro as well as with mice first authors Kim Png a graduate student and Nils Halberg a postdoctoral fellow found that miR126 blocks three novel cancer genes known as IGFBP2 MERTK and PITPNC1 Although each of the genes works on distinct pathways discovered by this group the results are the same more endothelial cells and increased blood vessel formation in the metastases But what s most remarkable about the results the researchers say is what happens after the blood vessels form The team s experiments show that enhanced expression of these genes increases metastasis in mice And when they went further testing clinical samples of human tumors for expression of the three genes they found a clear correlation patients whose tumors had higher expression of these genes were more prone to relapse The endothelial cells aren

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2011/12/16/in-cancer-molecular-signals-that-recruit-blood-vessels-may-also-trigger-metastasis/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Titia de Lange receives 2011 Vilcek Prize in Biomedical Science | Newswire
    publicize and celebrate the accomplishments of foreign born artists and scientists de Lange who was born in the Netherlands and her colleagues study telomeres the elements that protect chromosome ends from unnecessary repair and mediate their replication This work has led to a greater understanding of how telomeres protect chromosome ends and what happens when telomere function is lost during the early stages of tumorigenesis In addition to the Vilcek Prize de Lange has received the 2010 Clowes Memorial Award from the American Association for Cancer Research the 2008 Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center Prize the 2005 NIH Director s Pioneer Award and the 2001 Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research de Lange is also an American Cancer Society Research Professor and serves as associate director of Rockefeller s Anderson Center for Cancer Research She is an elected member of the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences the European Molecular Biology Organization and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences She is a foreign associate of the National Academy of Sciences and a member of the Institute of Medicine Maria Freire president of the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation will present the 2011 Vilcek Prizes for Biomedical Science at the Vilcek

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2011/02/22/titia-de-lange-receives-2011-vilcek-prize-in-biomedical-science/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Vilcek Prize | Newswire
    receives 2011 Vilcek Prize in Biomedical Science Rockefeller researcher is honored for her research on mechanisms that help maintain genome stability More Tags Laboratory of Cell Biology and Genetics Titia de Lange Vilcek Prize Search for Categories Science News Awards and Honors Campus News Grants Gifts Topics Video Archive 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 more About Contact Follow rockefelleruniv Like The Rockefeller University RU Footer The Rockefeller University 1230 York

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/tag/vilcek-prize/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Two Rockefeller scientists elected to Institute of Medicine | Newswire
    X mental retardation Darnell s lab also has shown that the immune systems of PND patients thwart tumors with what begins as a classical antiviral response The patients T cells produce antibodies and T cells that recognize the neuronal antigens found within their tumors They also discovered that apoptotic tumor cells serve as potent instigators of this immune response in PND patients and are developing cancer vaccines for use in small scale clinical trials performed at The Rockefeller University Hospital to mimic PND tumor immunity Darnell joined Rockefeller University in 1992 as assistant professor and associate physician at The Rockefeller University Hospital He was named associate professor in 1997 and professor and senior physician in 2000 In 2002 Dr Darnell was appointed investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and named Heilbrunn Professor at Rockefeller Darnell s awards include the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Clinical Scientist Award in Translational Research in 2000 the Derek Denny Brown Young Neurological Scholar Award in 1998 and the Irma T Hirschl Trust Career Scientist Award in 1996 de Lange who is the Leon Hess Professor at Rockefeller and an American Cancer Society Professor focuses on how telomeres protect chromosome ends de Lange identified a protein complex at telomeres called shelterin and has shown how this complex hides the chromosome end from the cellular machinery that detects and repairs broken DNA ends Telomeres undergo erosion in the early stages of cancer development and de Lange s work has clarified how the loss of telomere function generates genome instability and can drive cancer progression A native of the Netherlands de Lange received her Ph D from the University of Amsterdam and came to Rockefeller University in 1990 She is a foreign associate of the National Academy of Sciences and has received the G H A Clowes Memorial

    Original URL path: http://newswire.rockefeller.edu/2010/10/11/two-rockefeller-scientists-elected-to-institute-of-medicine/ (2016-02-13)
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