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  • October 2012 — Rutgers FOCUS
    husband than molding a career minded mathematician Fifty years later Cohen is a recognized pioneer in math education reform October 19 2012 Rutgers Soccer Player Committed to the Scarlet Knights Despite Battling Epilepsy An aspiring nurse Sara Corson has proven that someone with epilepsy can make a positive contribution to the team October 18 2012 Mason Gross Alum s Film Lights up Times Square André Costantini s Universal Pulse a three minute film about New York plays on screens at 42nd Street every evening in October October 17 2012 Amidst Turmoil Rutgers Law Students Get Look at Israeli Legal System An exchange with Ben Gurion University focuses on services for children and families October 17 2012 Rutgers Student with Cerebral Palsy Taking a Shot at His Dreams Anthony Bonelli has cerebral palsy affecting his mobility and speech But regardless of his condition Bonelli is ambitious and unstoppable October 12 2012 New Website for Students by Students Explores Campus Life Inspiration can strike anywhere on campus for the student staff of I AM Rutgers a website devoted to covering the lives of of their classmates from what they wear to the little known clubs they can join October 11 2012 Rutgers Graduate s Legacy and Spirit Live on through Slogan and Foundation Cancer was no match for Shaneice Brittingham s determination to earn her degree October 10 2012 Rescuing Aunt Iris Aunt Iris was not Martin Gliserman s favorite aunt but he got to know her best in her last years as she became increasingly his responsibility October 09 2012 Rutgers Professor s 20 Year Project Gives Voice to African Women Worldwide For the chair of Women s and Gender Studies Women Writing Africa presented a professional and personal challenge October 04 2012 Pursuit of the Perfect Cup of Coffee Is

    Original URL path: http://news.rutgers.edu/focus/issue.2012-09-28.0951227338 (2012-11-09)
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  • October 2012 — Rutgers FOCUS
    husband than molding a career minded mathematician Fifty years later Cohen is a recognized pioneer in math education reform October 19 2012 Rutgers Soccer Player Committed to the Scarlet Knights Despite Battling Epilepsy An aspiring nurse Sara Corson has proven that someone with epilepsy can make a positive contribution to the team October 18 2012 Mason Gross Alum s Film Lights up Times Square André Costantini s Universal Pulse a three minute film about New York plays on screens at 42nd Street every evening in October October 17 2012 Amidst Turmoil Rutgers Law Students Get Look at Israeli Legal System An exchange with Ben Gurion University focuses on services for children and families October 17 2012 Rutgers Student with Cerebral Palsy Taking a Shot at His Dreams Anthony Bonelli has cerebral palsy affecting his mobility and speech But regardless of his condition Bonelli is ambitious and unstoppable October 12 2012 New Website for Students by Students Explores Campus Life Inspiration can strike anywhere on campus for the student staff of I AM Rutgers a website devoted to covering the lives of of their classmates from what they wear to the little known clubs they can join October 11 2012 Rutgers Graduate s Legacy and Spirit Live on through Slogan and Foundation Cancer was no match for Shaneice Brittingham s determination to earn her degree October 10 2012 Rescuing Aunt Iris Aunt Iris was not Martin Gliserman s favorite aunt but he got to know her best in her last years as she became increasingly his responsibility October 09 2012 Rutgers Professor s 20 Year Project Gives Voice to African Women Worldwide For the chair of Women s and Gender Studies Women Writing Africa presented a professional and personal challenge October 04 2012 Pursuit of the Perfect Cup of Coffee Is

    Original URL path: http://news.rutgers.edu/focus/issue.2012-09-28.0951227338/ (2012-11-09)
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  • Rutgers Focus — Rutgers FOCUS
    a story idea fill out the form below You may also upload a photograph You can also contact Focus editor Carla Cantor or associate editor John Chadwick We are interested in the following types of stories Profiles of interesting people faculty staff or students or programs on the university s three campuses News articles about program changes new offerings policy updates Research articles featuring findings of Rutgers faculty or staff members New books by faculty and staff 2008 2009 publication dates News briefs and other short items of interest including grants appointments and other updates Awards and honors for individuals and departments Events Organizations departments colleges schools and affiliate groups from Rutgers may submit event announcements for promotional consideration in Focus The Focus event page also provides a link to the Rutgers Events Calendar to which university affiliated units can submit information FOCUS also accepts submissions of first person essays Running between 500 and more than 1 000 words these essays should be related in some way to the writer s experience at or with Rutgers Writers are encouraged to contact an editor to discuss an idea before submitting a completed manuscript The following are examples of past FOCUS essays

    Original URL path: http://news.rutgers.edu/focus/submit-news (2012-11-09)
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  • First Transgender Class at Rutgers Explores Misunderstood Identity — Rutgers FOCUS
    boundary But it doesn t says Aizura who is transgender himself Jorgensen worked hard to learn so called feminine mannerisms during the process of changing gender Aizura told the class It was Jorgensen s goal to pass as female But toward the end of the 20th century sexuality and gender became more fluid concepts than they were in Jorgensen s day A new identity emerged in which transgender people began to identify as the opposite gender without modifying their bodies or cross dressing Today people can have a complicated understanding of gender that can change throughout their lifetimes Aizura says It s not necessarily a process that s finished that means you come out the other end looking like a normal man or woman Aizura s class is one of a smattering of transgender studies courses in the nation and coincides with Rutgers outreach efforts to transgender students When Jenny Kurtz director of Rutgers Center for Social Justice Education and LGBT Communities came to Rutgers four years ago there was one self identified transgender student on campus Now there are at least 35 she says When you have programs and resources people are more likely to come out and say hey I m not the only member of this community Kurtz says Kurtz s office is in the process of surveying transgender students about their concerns and reviewing existing policies at Rutgers to see what could be improved More gender neutral bathrooms are high on the list as is a more well defined policy on transgender athletes for instance whether transgender students can compete on male or female teams despite their biological gender From November 12 16 the center is holding TransWeek five days of programming and events exploring transgender issues In Aizura s class most students don t appear

    Original URL path: http://news.rutgers.edu/focus/issue.2012-09-28.0951227338/article.2012-11-09.0249225597 (2012-11-09)
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  • Rutgers Professor Stands up for the Spiritual and Moral Values of Islam — Rutgers FOCUS
    atrocities in various parts of the world don t represent Islam but they get attention in the media We have to look at the distinctions between how people abuse Islam and what it actually teaches Most people who criticize Islam haven t read the Qur an Habib was recently named a Fulbright specialist scholar and has been invited to help reconfigure the English curriculum at the University of al Akhawayn in Morocco He also won a Fulbright in 2004 to conduct research in Malaysia In his translation of the Qur an Habib wants readers to appreciate its literary value I m trying to convey the rhythm of the words the cadence and the aesthetic qualities of the language says Habib who lives in Cherry Hill Habib writes about his faith in his first collection of poetry Shades of Islam 2010 Some of the poems are political condemning terrorists and tyrannical governments In To a Suicide Bomber he writes Because of you I am reviled Because of you your own people suffer Because of you Oppression speaks louder Because of yo u my religion ree ls in shame Other poems concern love and the experience of migration While very young Habib

    Original URL path: http://news.rutgers.edu/focus/issue.2012-09-28.0951227338/article.2012-10-24.4046808324 (2012-11-09)
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  • Rutgers Sensory Motor Integration Lab Pioneering New Method of Detecting Autism — Rutgers FOCUS
    in the way these children sense and perceive the physical world and the ways in which they integrate that information with their own body motions Torres says People without the disorder she explains can perceive their own physical behavior We have maps of our body in various parts of the brain that tell you for example where your foot is in relation to your hand or when and where someone touched you But for them this information is corrupted From moment to moment the timing of their motions is different It s like a radio tuned to the wrong frequency In 2009 Torres received a 650 000 grant from the National Science Foundation shared with Rutgers Dimitri Metaxas a professor in the Department of Computer Science The two teamed up with medical and physics researchers at Indiana University to test and develop the technology a study that ended in August The researchers also are working to refine a method of using computer interfaces to treat non verbal children on the autism spectrum In Torres studies autistic children exposed to onscreen media such as videos of themselves cartoons a music video or a favorite TV show can learn to communicate what they like with a simple motion It s kind of like the Wii Torres explains Every time the children cross a certain region in space the media they like best goes on They start out randomly exploring their surroundings They seek where in space that interesting spot is which causes the media to play and then they do so more systematically Once they see a cause and effect connection they move deliberately The action becomes an intentional behavior According to the Center of Disease Control and Prevention one in 88 children nationwide is on the autism spectrum Torres believes that the autism community hasn t paid enough attention to the sensory and motor impairments of children on the spectrum or recognized how it can be key to diagnosis and treatment We have found ways to design therapies where one can help these children develop and improve their cognitive abilities says Jorge Jose a Professor of Integrative and Cellular Physiology at Indiana University who is working with Torres This is so unexplored The way autism is studied is completely divorced from the body even though this is a physical problem she says People should know how this could help Conventional therapies for autistic children Torres says may even be attempting to curb behavior that may be helping them in some way With a symptom like arm flapping for instance they might have to move repetitively to modulate sensory feedback If you try and abolish this behavior because it s undesirable socially it could actually be something that s compensatory In spite of all their deficits their systems are surviving and doing quite well They are capable of doing a lot but it s locked inside of them Last March Torres began working with Mount Sinai School of Medicine to measure progress

    Original URL path: http://news.rutgers.edu/focus/issue.2012-09-28.0951227338/article.2012-10-20.4901130451 (2012-11-09)
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  • Rutgers Mathematician Recounts Her Career Trajectory in a Field Not Always Welcoming to Women — Rutgers FOCUS
    didn t deserve teaching The percentage of women with doctorates in math has increased from single digits at the outset of Cohen s career to a range of 25 to 28 percent today The lesson still resonates As a professor Cohen works to help people learn rather than throw information at them As an advocate for math education reform she strives to inspire teachers to do likewise Cohen s efforts have earned her the praise of her peers including a Certificate of Meritorious Service from the Mathematical Association of America and a Distinguished Teaching Award from the New Jersey section of the organization In January the Association for Women in Mathematics AWM will present Cohen with the 23rd annual Louise Hay Award in San Diego for her achievements as a teacher scholar administrator and human being She said it felt good to be honored by a group she joined during its infancy when they were trying to figure out what it would take f or women to be accepted as colleagues in the mathematics research community The AWM s goal especially hit home for Cohen a newly minted Ph D mathematician elbowing her way into the boys club of mathematics research Strides have been made in the last 50 years According to the National Science Foundation NSF the percentage of women with doctorates in math has increased from single digits at the outset of Cohen s career to a range of 25 to 28 percent today Yet women still remain underrepresented in math careers the NSF reports Female scientists and engineers are concentrated in different occupations than are men with relatively high shares of women in the social sciences 53 percent and biological and medical sciences 51 percent and relatively low shares in engineering 13 percent and computer and mathematical sciences 26 percent Money security and family planning are largely to blame for that disparity according to Cohen Many folks especially women who are talented enough to enter math are also talented enough to be attracted to fields with rosier growth potential such as biomedical and pharmaceutical fields Too many math faculty are unaware of opportunities outside academia but young women are steered to industry by families who know that industry pays well and has more generous family leave policies than academia At Rutgers Cohen rose through the ranks from mathematics professor to dean to vice chair for the undergraduate program back to professor She is especially interested in the Korteweg de Vries equation and the cubic Schrödinger equation on the line She returned to the faculty in 1995 after stepping down as dean of what was then University College That decision was spurred by a health scare she suffered after the deaths of her father and second husband which happened less than a month apart and left her to care for her elderly mother and young son I got back to being able to concentrate on teaching math and I didn t have to deal with budget cuts and

    Original URL path: http://news.rutgers.edu/focus/issue.2012-09-28.0951227338/article.2012-10-19.1104221132 (2012-11-09)
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  • Rutgers Soccer Player Committed to the Scarlet Knights Despite Battling Epilepsy — Rutgers FOCUS
    1 record I m really proud of her in terms of how she s handled what is for a young person a difficult situation says Glenn Crooks the head women s soccer coach We re in such a competitive environment in our program and playing at such a high level That adds to the difficulty for her but at the same time it s what she wants to do she loves to train and she loves to work out Though she tried basketball and track and field in high school soccer has always been Corson s favorite sport especially since she has been playing it since the second grade I like how fast paced it is and how anything can happen in the game she says even if one team is clearly better than the other At Metuchen High School the soccer awards started to pile up for the four year starter Corson was a New Jersey Girls Soccer Coach Award Top 20 Player in her junior and senior years She was selected for the Division All Star Team in 2008 and 2009 led her team to a Group One State Championship and was named her team s Most Valuable Player in 2009 and 2010 After Corson discovered she was epileptic last year her teammates rallied around her helping her raise 500 selling bracelets and collecting donations in April for Epilepsy Awareness Month Corson decided to donate the money to a charity called CURE Citizens United in Research for Epilepsy a Chicago based nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting research and increasing awareness of the disease My goal has been to try to bring more awareness because even though I don t have that severe a case I ve been around people who do have severe cases especially little kids who

    Original URL path: http://news.rutgers.edu/focus/issue.2012-09-28.0951227338/article.2012-10-18.8645105900 (2012-11-09)
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