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  • Xing Lab of Genomics
    Genomics New Publication Drosophila piRNA GBE 2014 Our study on fly piRNA and transposable element interactioin is published in GBE Tongji joined the lab Tongji Xing joined our lab as a rotation studnet Welcome Tongji Welcome to the Xing Laboratory of Genomics Resarch in our lab focuses on the inter individual genomic diversity and the impact of genomic variation Mobile DNA Element Biology Mobile DNA elements account for at least

    Original URL path: http://xinglab.genetics.rutgers.edu/ (2015-03-09)
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  • Xing Lab of Genomics
    Approximately 45 of the human genome can currently be recognized as being derived from transposable elements In human genomes retrotransposons especially Alus and L1s have played significant role in shaping human genomic diversity and evolution Figure 2 These repeat elements tend to promote unequal crossover and are an important factor contributing to genomic instability Mobile element insertions can also cause disease either directly by interrupting a gene or by mediate nonhomologous recombination resulting in disease causing insertions and deletions In addition to their genomic impact mobile elements are highly useful as genetic markers in tracing relationships of populations and species Figure 2 Major Types of Human Mobile Elements A DNA transposon Active DNA transposons encode an transposase used for their transposition B Alu element Each full length Alu element is about 300 base pair bp in length Alu elements do not encode any proteins C SVA element Full length SVA elements can be divided into five components shown in the diagram D LINE Full length LINE contains an RNA polymerase II promoter region and encodes an RNA binding protein ORF1 as well as a second protein ORF2 with endonuclease and reverse transcriptase activity Despite the profound impact of mobile elements

    Original URL path: http://xinglab.genetics.rutgers.edu/xinglab/2013-07-08-19-47-11/mobile-element-biology (2015-03-09)
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  • Xing Lab of Genomics
    evolutionary history has important implications for biomedical research A good understanding of human evolutionary history such as gene flow genetic drift and natural selection can help us to interpret the distributions of rare and common disease causing alleles and to identify disease causing genes in the emerging era of personal genomics We will use data generated from our laboratory as well as publically available genomic data to study human evolutionary

    Original URL path: http://xinglab.genetics.rutgers.edu/xinglab/2013-07-08-19-47-11/human-population-history (2015-03-09)
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  • Xing Lab of Genomics
    and diseases Disease Gene Identification One interest of my lab is to identify disease causing genes using genome wide data I have participated in the development of a candidate gene prioritization program called Variant Annotation Analysis and Search Tool VAAST Starting from variant file s of interest e g exome whole genome SNPs VAAST will annotate function variants such as protein coding changes assess the likelihood that a specific variant

    Original URL path: http://xinglab.genetics.rutgers.edu/xinglab/2013-07-08-19-47-11/disease-gene-identification (2015-03-09)
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  • Xing Lab of Genomics
    unrelated findings in the context of complex disease research ethical and clinical implications Discovery Medicine 12 62 41 55 Rope A F K Wang R Evjenth J Xing J J Johnston J J Swensen W E Johnson B Moore C D Huff L M Bird J C Carey J M Opitz C A Stevens T Jiang C Schank H D Fain R Robison B Dalley S Chin S T South T J Pysher L B Jorde H Hakonarson J R Lillehaug L G Biesecker M Yandell T Arnesen and G J Lyon 2011 Using VAAST to identify an X Linked disorder resulting in lethality in male infants due to N terminal acetyltransferase deficiency American Journal of Human Genetics 89 1 28 43 news feature in Nature Yandell M C D Huff H Hu M Singleton B Moore J Xing L B Jorde and M G Reese 2011 A probabilistic disease gene finder for personal genomes Genome Research news feature in Nature Roos C D Zinner L S Kubatko C Schwarz M Yang D Meyer S D Nash J Xing M A Batzer M Brameier F H Leendertz T Ziegler D Perwitasari Farajallah T Nadler L Walter and M Osterholz 2011 Nuclear versus mitochondrial DNA Evidence for hybridization in colobine monkeys BMC Evolutionary Biology 11 77 Huff C D Witherspoon D J Simonson T S J Xing W S Watkins Y Zhang T M Tuohy D W Neklason R W Burt S L Guthery S R Woodward and L B Jorde 2011 Maximum likelihood estimation of recent shared ancestry ERSA using shared genome segments Genome Research 21 5 768 74 Simonson T S J Xing R Barrett E Jerah P Loa Y Zhang W S Watkins D J Witherspoon C D Huff S Woodward B Mowry and L B Jorde 2011 Ancestry of the Iban is predominantly Southeast Asian genetic evidence from autosomal mitochondrial and Y chromosomes PLoS One 6 1 e16338 Xing J W S Watkins Y Hu C D Huff A Sabo D M Muzny M J Bamshad R A Gibbs L B Jorde and F Yu 2010 Inference of human expansion in Eurasia and genetic diversity in India Genome Biology 11 R113 The 1000 Genomes Project Consortium 2010 A map of human genome variation from population scale sequencing Nature 467 1061 1073 cover article news feature in Nature Xing J W S Watkins A Shlien E Walker C D Huff D J Witherspoon Y Zhang T S Simonson R B Weiss J D Schiffman D Malkin S R Woodward and L B Jorde 2010 Toward a more Uniform Sampling of Human Genetic Diversity A Survey of Worldwide Populations by High density Genotyping Genomics 96 199 210 Witherspoon D J J Xing Y Zhang W S Watkins M A Batzer and L B Jorde 2010 Mobile element scanning ME Scan by targeted high throughput sequencing BMC Genomics 11 1 410 Simonson T S Y Yang C D Huff H Yun G Qin D J Witherspoon Z Bai F R

    Original URL path: http://xinglab.genetics.rutgers.edu/xinglab/publications (2015-03-09)
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  • Xing Lab of Genomics
    Genomic Variation Evolution Human demographic history and diseases Jinchuan Xing Ph D I joined Rutgers in January 2012 My long term research interest is to understand the mechanisms and consequences of human genomic variation My current projects involve elucidating human population history and genetic adaptation at both global and regional scale with or without disease implication Research Interest Mobile element biology Population genetics Medical genomics Evolutionary genomics Curriculum Vitae Contact

    Original URL path: http://xinglab.genetics.rutgers.edu/xinglab/people/principal-investigator (2015-03-09)
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  • Xing Lab of Genomics
    Postdoctoral Associate Graduate Student Undergraduate Student Personal Pages Collaborators Positions Alumni News Contact Links Gallery Welcome to the Xing Lab of Genomics We study Genomic Variation Evolution Human demographic history and diseases Postdoctoral Associate Hongseok Ha Ph D Yeting Zhang

    Original URL path: http://xinglab.genetics.rutgers.edu/xinglab/people/postdoctoral-associate (2015-03-09)
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  • Xing Lab of Genomics
    People Principal Investigator Postdoctoral Associate Graduate Student Undergraduate Student Personal Pages Collaborators Positions Alumni News Contact Links Gallery Welcome to the Xing Lab of Genomics We study Genomic Variation Evolution Human demographic history and diseases Graduate Student Anbo Zhou Copyright

    Original URL path: http://xinglab.genetics.rutgers.edu/xinglab/people/graduate-student (2015-03-09)
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