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  • Kent E. Calder | SAIS
    Studies Japan Studies Korea Studies Rome 609 202 663 5889 kcalder jhu edu Expertise Topics Energy Issues Energy and Security Strategic and Security Issues International Political Economy Languages Japanese Background and Education Kent Calder is currently Director of the Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies at Johns Hopkins SAIS in Washington D C He also serves as Director of Japan Studies He was awarded the Order of the Rising Sun Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon in the Fall of 2014 Before arriving at Johns Hopkins SAIS in 2003 he taught for twenty years at Princeton University was a Visiting Professor at Seoul National University and Lecturer on Government at Harvard University Calder has served as Special Advisor to the U S Ambassador to Japan 1997 2001 Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies 1989 1993 and 1996 and as the first Executive Director of Harvard University s Program on U S Japan Relations during 1979 1980 Calder received his Ph D from Harvard University in 1979 where he worked under the direction of Edwin O Reischauer A specialist in East Asian political economy Calder has spent eleven years living and researching in Japan and four years elsewhere in East Asia His most recent works include The US Japan and the Gulf Region August 2015 Asia in Washington Brookings 2014 and The New Continentalism Energy and Twenty First Century Eurasian Geopolitics Yale 2012 He has also authored Embattled Garrisons Comparative Base Politics and American Globalism Princeton 2007 co authored The Making of Northeast Asia Stanford 2010 and co edited East Asian Multilateralism with Francis Fukuyama Among Calder s major works on Japanese politics and public policy are Crisis and Compensation Princeton 1988 and Strategic Capitalism Princeton 1993 He has also written extensively on Asian energy geopolitics and U

    Original URL path: http://www.sais-jhu.edu/users/kcalder2 (2015-11-11)
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  • Faculty Directory | SAIS
    Nanjing China You are here Faculty Directory Faculty Directory Entire Faculty Full Time Faculty Regular Faculty Other Full Time Faculty Part Time Faculty Visiting Faculty Scholars Language Faculty Emeritus Faculty Entire Faculty Full Time Faculty Regular Faculty Other Full Time Faculty Part Time Faculty Visiting Faculty Scholars Language Faculty Emeritus Faculty SAIS GUIDE TO EXPERTS The SAIS Guide to Experts in International Affairs serves as a resource for the media and the foreign policy community We hope that you will call on our SAIS faculty and scholars for comment or background information Download Now Request a Copy Any Bologna Italy Nanjing China SAIS Europe Washington D C Any African Studies American Foreign Policy Canadian Studies China Studies Conflict Management Energy Resources and Environment European and Eurasian Studies Global Theory and History International Development International Economics International Law and Organizations International Political Economy International Relations Japan Studies Korea Studies Latin American Studies Middle East Studies South Asia Studies Southeast Asia Studies Strategic Studies Full Time Faculty Regular Faculty Other Full Time Faculty Part Time Faculty Visiting Faculty Scholars Language Faculty Emeritus Faculty ALL A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z C David P Calleo Dean Acheson Professor Washington D C Email Marco Cesa Professor of International Relations Bologna Italy Email Ling Chen Assistant Professor of International Political Economy Washington D C Email Andrew Cheon Assistant Professor of International Political Economy Washington D C Email Gaye Christoffersen Resident Professor of International Politics Nanjing China Email Eliot A Cohen Robert E Osgood Professor of Strategic Studies Washington D C Email Celeste Connors Associate Practitioner in Residence in the Energy Resources and Environment Program Washington D C Email Svante E Cornell Director of the Central

    Original URL path: http://www.sais-jhu.edu/faculty-directory?field_last_name_value=&field_profile_campus_tid=All&field_profile_programs_nid=All&field_profile_faculty_status_tid[0]=3608&field_profile_faculty_status_tid[1]=3609&field_profile_faculty_status_tid[2]=3610&page=1 (2015-11-11)
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  • Faculty Directory | SAIS
    Time Faculty Visiting Faculty Scholars Language Faculty Emeritus Faculty Entire Faculty Full Time Faculty Regular Faculty Other Full Time Faculty Part Time Faculty Visiting Faculty Scholars Language Faculty Emeritus Faculty SAIS GUIDE TO EXPERTS The SAIS Guide to Experts in International Affairs serves as a resource for the media and the foreign policy community We hope that you will call on our SAIS faculty and scholars for comment or background information Download Now Request a Copy Any Bologna Italy Nanjing China SAIS Europe Washington D C Any African Studies American Foreign Policy Canadian Studies China Studies Conflict Management Energy Resources and Environment European and Eurasian Studies Global Theory and History International Development International Economics International Law and Organizations International Political Economy International Relations Japan Studies Korea Studies Latin American Studies Middle East Studies South Asia Studies Southeast Asia Studies Strategic Studies Full Time Faculty Regular Faculty Other Full Time Faculty Part Time Faculty Visiting Faculty Scholars Language Faculty Emeritus Faculty ALL A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z D Cinnamon Dornsife Senior Advisor School of Advanced International Studies Johns Hopkins University Senior Fellow The Foreign Policy Institute Washington D C Email E Eric Edelman Roger Hertog Distinguished Practitioner in Residence at the Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies Washington D C Email F Jessica Fanzo Bloomberg Distinguished Associate Professor of Ethics Global Food and Agriculture Washington D C Email Leo Feler Assistant Professor of International Economics Washington D C Email Carla Park Freeman Associate Director of the China Studies Program Associate Research Professor and Executive Director of the SAIS Foreign Policy Institute Washington D C Email G Mark Gilbert Professor of History and International Studies Bologna Italy Email Piero Gleijeses Professor

    Original URL path: http://www.sais-jhu.edu/faculty-directory?field_last_name_value=&field_profile_campus_tid=All&field_profile_programs_nid=All&field_profile_faculty_status_tid[0]=3608&field_profile_faculty_status_tid[1]=3609&field_profile_faculty_status_tid[2]=3610&page=2 (2015-11-11)
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  • Faculty Directory | SAIS
    Directory Entire Faculty Full Time Faculty Regular Faculty Other Full Time Faculty Part Time Faculty Visiting Faculty Scholars Language Faculty Emeritus Faculty Entire Faculty Full Time Faculty Regular Faculty Other Full Time Faculty Part Time Faculty Visiting Faculty Scholars Language Faculty Emeritus Faculty SAIS GUIDE TO EXPERTS The SAIS Guide to Experts in International Affairs serves as a resource for the media and the foreign policy community We hope that you will call on our SAIS faculty and scholars for comment or background information Download Now Request a Copy Any Bologna Italy Nanjing China SAIS Europe Washington D C Any African Studies American Foreign Policy Canadian Studies China Studies Conflict Management Energy Resources and Environment European and Eurasian Studies Global Theory and History International Development International Economics International Law and Organizations International Political Economy International Relations Japan Studies Korea Studies Latin American Studies Middle East Studies South Asia Studies Southeast Asia Studies Strategic Studies Full Time Faculty Regular Faculty Other Full Time Faculty Part Time Faculty Visiting Faculty Scholars Language Faculty Emeritus Faculty ALL A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

    Original URL path: http://www.sais-jhu.edu/faculty-directory?field_last_name_value=&field_profile_campus_tid=All&field_profile_programs_nid=All&field_profile_faculty_status_tid[0]=3608&field_profile_faculty_status_tid[1]=3609&field_profile_faculty_status_tid[2]=3610&page=8 (2015-11-11)
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  • ED Gainful Employment Disclosure Template
    tracked Name of the accrediting agency this placement rate is calculated for Who is included in the calculation of this rate What types of jobs were these students placed in When were the former students employed How were completers tracked Click on the links below for more information on jobs related to this program Program name Program Level Program Length How much will this program cost me Tuition and fees Books and supplies On campus room board What other costs are there for this program For further program cost information click here The amounts shown above include costs for the entire program assuming normal time to completion Note that this information is subject to change What financing options are available to help me pay for this program Financing for this program may be available through grants scholarships loans federal and private and institutional financing plans The median amount of debt for program graduates is shown below Federal loans Private education loans Institutional financing plan There were fewer than 10 graduates in this program Median amounts are withheld to preserve the confidentiality of graduates The school has elected to provide the following additional information XX of program graduates used loans to help finance their costs for this program How long will it take me to complete this program The program is designed to take XX months to complete Of those that completed the program in 2013 2014 XX finished in XX months Fewer than 10 students completed this program in 2013 14 The number who finished within the normal time has been withheld to preserve the confidentiality of the students What are my chances of getting a job when I graduate The job placement rate for students who completed this program is XX For further information about this job placement rate

    Original URL path: http://www.sais-jhu.edu/sites/default/files/certificate-istudies-15/Gedt.html (2015-11-11)
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  • American Foreign Policy
    of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to do original research and work on their writing skills Following several introductory sessions students will define a topic and write a substantial paper for completion by the end of the semester Papers will typically be based on primary sources including declassified State Department and other government documents speeches memoirs and periodicals For AFP concentrators the paper should be 40 60 pages in length and when completed will serve to fulfill the area capstone requirement Non AFP concentrators are welcome and will write papers of 25 40 pages in length Students will meet a series of deadlines set out below allowing them to finish the paper by the end of the semester Close Close Concentration Profile American Foreign Policy The United States is the most powerful the most important and the most controversial country in the world Its foreign policies have a major impact on every region of the planet and every significant international issue from nuclear nonproliferation to world trade to global warming Studying the history of American foreign policy the processes by which that policy is made and the range of issues with which the country deals therefore provides a useful perspective on international relations as a whole as well as an understanding of the role of the United States in the international system While the SAIS American Foreign Policy concentration has a strong focus on history the discipline does face some interesting challenges in the modern world Close Close The American Interest Aug 1 2015 http www the american interest com 2015 08 01 euromess 2 Euromess 2 Close 1 window location jQuery this val replace URL else sais page left nav switch jQuery this val Overview Curriculum Minor Faculty Featured Courses Program Activities Events Calendar Contact Overview Curriculum Minor Faculty Featured Courses Program Activities Events Calendar Contact The American Foreign Policy Program prepares students to understand the history particularly from the Spanish American War to the present culture ideas premises and perspectives process and politics of America s foreign relations and contemporary issues of American foreign policy Recent Photos Video Conversation with Thomas L Friedman 10 15 2015 Recent Photos Close Conversation with Thomas L Friedman 10 15 2015 GPP Residency Program 2015 Recent Photos Close GPP Residency Program 2015 AFP GTH China Study Trip 2011 Recent Photos Close AFP GTH China Study Trip 2011 AFP GTH China Study Trip 2011 Recent Photos Close AFP GTH China Study Trip 2011 Great Wall of China 2011 Recent Photos Close Great Wall of China 2011 AFP GTH China Study Trip 2011 Recent Photos Close AFP GTH China Study Trip 2011 AFP GTH China Study Trip 2011 Recent Photos Close AFP GTH China Study Trip 2011 AFP GTH China Study Trip 2011 Recent Photos Close AFP GTH China Study Trip 2011 Show More Curriculum American Foreign Policy M A Requirements American Foreign Policy Program Learning Goals and Objectives 7 Entering Class 2015 2016 Students must take the equivalent of 16 non language courses 64 credits in order to graduate Those students who are approved for dual degree or advanced standing may only need to take 12 courses 48 credits or 14 courses 56 credits as approved by Academic Affairs AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY Students concentrating in American Foreign Policy AFP must take at least 5 courses within the field One of the five can include the core course SA 100 720 American Foreign Policy Since World War II if taken for credit Students may also count the spring 16 two credit course SA 200 767 International Crisis Diplomacy as one of the 5 courses INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS Students must complete 4 courses within this program Microeconomics Macroeconomics prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics International Trade Theory prerequisite Microeconomics International Monetary Theory prerequisite Macroeconomics Eligible students who pass the waiver exams in these subjects or who pass Micro and or Macro in Pre Term must replace those courses with alternate economics courses Many students choose to pursue an International Economics Specialization 8 in one of four areas of economics and therefore use electives to meet these requirements Students may also choose to specialize in Emerging Markets 9 Students must receive a 2 67 average in the 4 required economics courses or they must retake a course s until a 2 67 average is obtained If any of the 4 courses are achieved by passing a waiver exam or during Pre Term the student must substitute an economics elective course s in place of the waived course s in order to fulfill the economics requirement above In this case SAIS will use the highest economics program elective course grade s to compute this average if a student is replacing one or more of the 4 required courses of Microeconomics Macroeconomics International Trade Theory or International Monetary Theory QUANTITATIVE REASONING Students must complete one course from the list below Statistical Methods for Business Economics Econometrics prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business Economics Applied Econometrics prerequisite Econometrics Macro Econometrics prerequisite Econometrics Risk Analysis and Modeling Corporate Finance prerequisite or concurrent Microeconomics Quantitative Methods in International Relations prerequisite Statistical Methods for Business Economics Students may not double count a Quantitative Reasoning requirement as one of the four required International Economics courses and vice versa Eligible students who pass the statistics waiver exam or pass the statistics course in Pre Term are still required to take an alternate Quantitative Reasoning course from the list above CORE COURSES EXAMS All SAIS students must pass 2 core exams and or courses American Foreign Policy concentrators must pass American Foreign Policy Since World War II as one of their core requirements prior to the start of their third semester If the second core is not completed by the start of the final semester a student must enroll in second core course American Foreign Policy Since World War II Comparative National Systems Evolution of the International Systems Theories of International Relations LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY MA candidates must pass exams to demonstrate proficiency in a second language This language must be offered at SAIS Students whose native language is not English may use English as their proficiency language All non native English speakers are required to pass an English placement exam upon entering SAIS even if not using English for proficiency CAPSTONE American Foreign Policy concentrators must produce a major research paper on a subject approved by a full time faculty member in the American Foreign Policy Program This requirement is fulfilled by one of the following 1 Successful completion of the course American Foreign Policy Thesis Seminar SA 200 758 2 Successful completion of the course Case Studies in US Foreign Policy SA 200 762 3 A paper produced through significant research in a regular course or through supervised independent research PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS BY ACADEMIC YEAR Entering Class 2014 2015 10 Entering Class 2013 2014 11 Entering Class 2012 2013 12 Entering Class 2011 2012 13 Entering Class 2010 2011 14 Entering Class 2009 2010 15 Minor American Foreign Policy Minor Requirements as of AY15 16 3 American Foreign Policy or cross listed courses of which 1 can be the core course American Foreign Policy Since World War II SA 100 720 students may also count the spring 16 two credit course SA 200 767 International Crisis Diplomacy as one of the 3 courses Passing the core exam American Foreign Policy Since WWII if not taken as one of the three AFP minor courses is highly recommended General Minor Requirements Minors are optional like specializations A student can minor in only one area A student cannot pursue a minor in International Economics or IR General but can pursue a Specialization in International Economics 16 Minors consist of three courses Some minors will have a required course s Some minors will have an anchor course or cross listed course that counts toward both the concentration and the minor which reduces the three additional required courses to two as the third will overlap both programs in the IR or Asia concentrations the course must be from the primary concentration area Conflict Management Global Theory and History China Japan etc and not from the two additional required courses across the other IR or Asia areas Regional minors may require language study or proficiency in the language of that region A student can declare a minor at any time prior to graduation Students who are pursuing a minor in a program will not have bidding priority in that program only concentrators To add or change a minor please click HERE 17 Faculty Any Bologna Italy Nanjing China SAIS Europe Washington D C 18 Zbigniew Brzezinski 19 Senior Research Professor of International Relations Washington D C Email 20 21 Piero Gleijeses 22 Professor of American Foreign Policy Washington D C Email 23 24 John L Harper 25 Kenneth H Keller Professor Professor of American Foreign Policy Bologna Italy Email 26 27 Michael Mandelbaum 28 Christian A Herter Professor of American Foreign Policy Washington D C Email 29 30 David W Ellwood 31 Senior Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies Bologna Italy Email 32 33 Hanns Maull 34 Adjunct Professor of International Relations Bologna Italy Email 35 36 Jacqueline Mazza 37 Adjunct Professor Washington D C Email 38 39 Phyllis Elliott Oakley 40 Adjunct Professor Email 41 42 Alan Platt 43 Foreign Policy Institute Fellow Washington D C Email 44 45 Charles A Stevenson 46 Professorial Lecturer in American Foreign Policy Washington D C Email 47 Pages 1 2 48 next 48 last 48 Featured Courses Spring 2016 Show Details NEW COURSE International Crisis Diplomacy Ambassador Philip Kaplan The end of the Cold War that dominated the second half of the twentieth century The end of the Cold War that dominated the second half of the twentieth century tore apart longstanding patterns of global politics Some former objects of the great powers became players on the global stage sometimes important sometimes bit actors but always aspiring for a role in shaping events Many great powers of the 19th and early 20th centuries became less consequential Long suppressed grievances arose among those on the rise and those in decline The rise of China the Arab Awakening and its tumultuous aftermath the financial crises in Europe Japan and the United States reinforce these tendencies This course will explore some of these momentous changes through selected international crises related events and looming future threats and how America may deal with them Attention will focus on cold war and post cold war Europe on Iran and the Middle East on East Asia and globalization and their historical contexts We will explore and discuss the implications of these changes for United States interests and for American foreign policy Each class will consist of a lecture covering the subject of the week to be followed by class discussion and Socratic questioning designed to deepen students understanding of the trade offs inherent in the issues and skill in analyzing them Course Number SA 200 767 Campus Washington D C Term Spring 2016 Spring 2016 Show Details Conduct of Foreign Policy Professor Charles Stevenson 2 sections This course deals with the process of analyzing deciding and implementing U S This course deals with the process of analyzing deciding and implementing U S foreign policy It gives students a framework for thinking strategically about policy and concepts for analyzing the results of policy choices It emphasizes the bureaucratic and political factors that influence decision making It concentrates on the central role of the President but also explores the particular capabilities and cultures of other government agencies as well as the influence of outside forces While certain readings are required for each class session this syllabus also gives a list of additional and background readings for students who may wish to pursue topics at greater depth such as for a course paper Students should purchase Mort Halperin s Bureaucratic Politics and Foreign Policy since its analysis is basic to understanding this course Not surprisingly Charles A Stevenson s America s Foreign Policy Toolkit Key Institutions and Processes provides the key themes for the course and many of its chapters are assigned While no longer assigned as required reading Steven Hook s U S Foreign Policy has been praised by students in prior years and could be most useful to students not already well grounded in US government and its foreign policy institutions Course Number SA 200 701 Campus Washington D C Term Spring 2016 Spring 2016 Show Details America Europe and the World Political Economy Professor David Calleo Surveys American economic policy domestic and foreign and the ideas events an Surveys American economic policy domestic and foreign and the ideas events and geopolitical and military concerns that have shaped it through successive administrations since World War II Discusses the legacy of the interwar and wartime years Subsequently tracks U S policy and foreign reactions to it from the Truman to the second Bush administration Blends history economics and international relations in an effort to explain the interplay in practice of economic ideas and events This is a cross listed course offered by the American Foreign Policy Program that also can fulfill a requirement for the Global Theory and History and European Studies programs Course Number SA 200 712 Campus Washington D C Term Spring 2016 Spring 2016 Show Details Current Issues in US Foreign Policy Professor Michael Mandelbaum Looks at contemporary issues in U S foreign policy including the question of w Looks at contemporary issues in U S foreign policy including the question of what is distinctively American about it the debate about U S purposes in the wake of the Cold War and contemporary U S policy in Europe and Asia Course Number SA 200 734 Campus Washington D C Term Spring 2016 Spring 2016 Show Details American Foreign Policy Thesis Seminar Professor Michael Mandelbaum Every American Foreign Policy concentrator is expected by the time of graduatio Every American Foreign Policy concentrator is expected by the time of graduation to have written at least one research paper at SAIS This can be done in one or more of three ways by writing a research paper with footnotes or endnotes although not necessarily with a bibliography on any subject for any SAIS course The paper should be submitted to the AFP departmental office for approval as fulfilling the thesis requirement Note that the paper will not be graded merely certified as fulfilling the requirement by enrolling the spring Thesis Seminar with Professor Mandelbaum ordinarily in the student s second year This course is not in fact a seminar it is a one on one tutorial with Professor Mandelbaum Students will receive course credit for their theses which are expected to be somewhat longer than a paper written as part of the fulfillment of the requirements for other SAIS courses Thesis Seminar papers must involve some aspect of American foreign policy Students interested in taking the Thesis Seminar should meet with Professor Mandelbaum during the second half of the fall semester to begin discussing a paper topic or by writing a paper through an independent study course with a SAIS faculty member subject to departmental approval The thesis requirement reflects the conviction that writing at least one serious research paper is a valuable part of a SAIS education because it involves skills selecting and refining a topic gathering material from diverse sources constructing a coherent and convincing argument and expressing it in clear narrative prose that will be useful in almost any post SAIS job a SAIS student is likely to do Course Number SA 200 758 Campus Washington D C Term Spring 2016 Fall 2015 Show Details Current Issues in International Relations Professor Michael Mandelbaum This course examines in depth twelve important issues in contemporary internatio This course examines in depth twelve important issues in contemporary international relations through the reading and discussion of a book devoted to each of them Requirements Three short 5 to 10 pages analytical essays based on topics designated by the instructor Course Number SA 200 763 Campus Washington D C Term Fall 2015 Fall 2015 Show Details Congress Foreign Policy Professor Charles Stevenson Office Hours by appointment Charlie Stevenson gmail com This class is taught jointly for SAIS students and APSA Congressional Fellows I This class is taught jointly for SAIS students and APSA Congressional Fellows In addition to the regular class sessions there will be a series of brownbag talks with special guests at 1230 on Wednesday during September and October SAIS students are strongly encouraged but not required to attend these sessions This class examines the way Congress functions and the interactions of politics processes and personalities We draw upon scholarly works case studies guest speakers and role playing exercises After studying the Constitutional authorities for legislative action and the general organization of Congress we place special focus on the congressional role in foreign policy trade defense and intelligence Course Requirements There will be several short papers see page 9 for details role playing exercises and opportunities for short presentations In addition SAIS students must choose either to write a research paper of about 5 000 words 20 pages double spaced on an approved topic or to sit for a half hour oral exam soon after the final class Students also need to follow a Senate or House campaign Course Number SA 200 700 2 sections Campus Washington D C Term Fall 2015 Fall 2015 Show Details Road to Empire The United States from Independence to World War II What is American foreign policy How has it evolved over time What is American foreign policy How has it evolved over time This course analyzes US foreign policy from independence to Pearl Harbor What is striking about these first 150 years of US diplomacy is how relevant many of its debates and crises are to US policy today Central to the Founding Fathers was the question of the uniqueness or exceptionalism of US diplomacy The tension between Jeffersonian idealism and Hamiltonian realism

    Original URL path: http://www.sais-jhu.edu/print/152449 (2015-11-11)
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  • Piero Gleijeses | SAIS
    Libraries Mason Library Robert Evans Library Nanjing Center Library Career Services Planning and Resources Skills Development Employment Outcomes For Employers Giving Locations Washington D C Bologna Italy Nanjing China You are here Piero Gleijeses Piero Gleijeses Piero Gleijeses Ph D Professor of American Foreign Policy American Foreign Policy Nitze 515 202 363 3815 slee255 jhu edu Expertise Topics American Foreign Policy Languages Afrikaans French German Italian Portuguese Russian Spanish Background and Education Awards include Guggenheim and MacArthur fellowships and Medal of Friendship from the Council of State of the Republic of Cuba Ph D international relations Graduate Institute of International Studies Geneva Publications Visions of Freedom Havana Washington Pretoria and the Struggle for Southern Africa 1976 1991 2013 The Cuban Drumbeat Castro s Worldview 2009 Cuba y África Historia común de lucha y sangre co author 2007 Conflicting Missions Havana Washington and Africa 1959 1976 2002 which won the 2002 Robert Ferrell Prize from the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations Shattered Hope The Guatemalan Revolution and the United States 1991 Politics and Culture in Guatemala 1988 Tilting at Windmills Reagan in Central America 1982 The Dominican Crisis The 1965 Constitutionalist Revolt and American Intervention 1978 articles in numerous

    Original URL path: http://www.sais-jhu.edu/piero-gleijeses (2015-11-11)
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  • John L. Harper | SAIS
    Internazionali in Rome contributing editor of Survival former German Marshall Fund Research Fellow recipient of the Robert Ferrell Prize from the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations and Marraro Prize from the Society for Italian Historical Studies Ph D European studies SAIS Publications The Cold War 2011 Italian edition by Il Mulino 2013 American Machiavelli Alexander Hamilton and the Origins of U S Foreign Policy 2004 American Visions of Europe Franklin D Roosevelt George F Kennan and Dean G Acheson 1994 America and the Reconstruction of Italy 1945 48 1986 Italian edition by Il Mulino 1984 author of articles and reviews for numerous periodicals including Foreign Affairs Survival the Journal of Cold War Studies H Diplo the American Historical Review The National Interest Christian Science Monitor and Times Literary Supplement Teaching News 2015 03 31 00 00 00 Spring 2015 Case Studies in US Foreign Policy SA 200 762 Show Details Following a rev Following a review of the major documents of U S foreign policy since the Farewell Address students write a major research paper on a historical topic using primary sources Spring 2015 Major Issues in US Foreign Policy SA 200 736 Show Details The purpose of The purpose of the course is to provoke debate on the current choices facing US foreign policy The course does not offer in depth training in debating or public speaking but does allow students to acquire practical skills and experience in those areas in other words to learn by doing The course consists of formal public four person and possibly two person debates based on some of the topics listed below and others suggested by the class Students submit their preferences and are grouped together at the beginning of the semester Each debate lasts one class session plus a period

    Original URL path: http://www.sais-jhu.edu/john-l-harper (2015-11-11)
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