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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    College also gave out small stipends for a total of 3 000 to reimburse students for their out of pocket expenses from their research projects in fall 2001 In an ongoing effort of increasing the numbers of scholarships and awards for the science and engineering students the College is asking you to contribute generously Please make checks payable to SFSU Foundation and send them back to the College If you

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/fall2001/advancement.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    limit the shorter the wavelength the slower the wave travels The Fourier representation of a pulse as a superposition of a spectrum of wavelengths thus explains why a localized pulse is a transient phenomenon as the wave propagates the long waves outrun the short waves and the wave comes apart into its component waves losing its initial shape and eventually dispersing But the soliton observed by Russell broke all the rules traveling faster than the speed limit for linear waves and perfectly maintaining its shape Several years ago a research project began at the Romberg center to study the motion of water in the Bay using an acoustic technique developed by oceanographers to study the temperature of the Pacific ocean Physics students Kip Laws Andrea Grant and Mike Ugawa working with professor Roger Bland designed an apparatus to measure the speed of moving water Sound waves of frequency 200 kHz are generated by underwater transducers adapted from fish finders used by small boat owners The travel time for sound from the transmitter to the receiver is measured with extremely high precision By comparing the travel times from south to north and from north to south the speed of the medium the water is extracted The technique is reminiscent of the famous Michaelson Morely experiment to detect the motion of the ether This apparatus was initially intended to study current flow in the Sacramento San Joaquin River Delta However preliminary tests in the Bay revealed unexpected and interesting results Figure 2 shows one of the ferries of the Larkspur San Francisco line with its wake trailing behind the ship This V shaped train of waves is the predominant feature of the linear theory of boat wakes first described by William Thompson otherwise known as Lord Kelvin after whom the Kelvin temperature scale is named This is not the whole story though Figure 3 graphs the measured water speed observed as a similar ferry passed The rapid variations near 14 18 mark the arrival of the classical Kelvin wake This wake rocks boats at anchor in Sausalito stirs up mud in the Corte Madera Ecological Reserve and in general makes its presence known in the North Bay The new discovery first noted by master s student Daniel Neuman is the train of eleven precursors arriving well in front of the ferry Other SFSU students involved in analysis of boat wake data are Daryl Haggard and Eric Tapio The precursors form a train of triangular pulses see inset not a smooth modulated sinusoid as in the case of the Kelvin wake Linear waves are limited in water of depth 10 m the average depth along the path of the approaching ferry to a speed of c0 10 m s where g is the acceration of gravity The diagram in figure 3 illustrates a hypothetical pattern of waves produced by the ferry Since the ferry itself is traveling at 10 to 12 m s over this part of its route it is clear that

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/fall2001/soliton.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    internship co op opportunities with your organization We also wish to create an opportunity for your organization to increase its visibility on our campus which is very important even during a weak job market If you are interested in participating in this event please submit a check for 200 00 no later than January 25th 2002 Space is very limited so register early The registration fee after January 25th is

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/fall2001/careerfair.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Enginering Alumni Chapter
    this banquet to honor Rochelle and Roy for being such wonderful mentors Entomologist and behavioral ecologist Sue Opp BA 79 Biology is currently a Cal State Hayward professor While teaching ecology evolution entomology and animal behavior in the classroom Dr Opp is leading the research on wiping out Mediterranean fruit flies Medfly the most tightly regulated and quarantined pest in the state Medfly invated California and infected about 1 400

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/spring2001/classnotes.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    seismic hazard efforts The current building code strongly acknowledges the importance of the site specific investigation of the soil property and the potential hazards of the seismic activities near the construction site This recognition has been mainly due to the observations of major structural damages from earthquakes in the past While conventional structural design has been evolved and still is utilized in many construction projects many innovative engineering methods are gaining increasing attention Among them base isolation and passive control using energy dissipation devices are the most viable options for enhanced seismic performance Conventional structural design strategy is to increase structural stiffness and or structural strength for higher structural demand Although structural isolation and energy dissipations may not be appropriate design option for most buildings they could be the most applicable for buildings that need to meet enhanced structural performance such as 911 emergency centers and government buildings or many high tech companies that can afford the special costs associated with the design fabrication installation and maintenance Base isolation and energy dissipation systems are relatively new and sophisticated concepts that require more extensive design and dynamic analysis than do most conventional design Another new design approach is performance based design The four building performance levels are Operational performance level Immediate occupancy performance level Life safety performance level and Collapse prevention performance level The four earthquake hazard level are identified based on the ground motion applied that have the following probabilities of exceedance and corresponding return periods such as 50 50 year Return period of 72 years 20 50 year Return period of 225 years 10 50 year Return period of 475 years and 2 50 year Return period of 2475 years The performance based design concept is that building performance level must be designed based on the corresponding earthquake hazard

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/spring2001/labnotes.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    dean he has changed the face of science at SFSU And many in the College are also going to miss Kelley s famous Christmas and St Patrick s Day parties At his final St Patrick s Day party last month he celebrated the rich history of immigration to the United States by acknowledging members of the College s faculty and staff To me St Patrick s Day is not to celebrate the Irish but to celebrate all immigrants who have made the United States what it is today he says The diversity of SFSU and the entire Bay Area are a constant reminder to Kelley of a crucial reason why he chose to come here from the University of Washington It is also what he will miss the most about SFSU On this campus I learn something every day Not necessarily about oceanography but about life he says Kelley will also miss teaching his course John Steinbeck and Doc Ricketts Literature and the Sea which he has been doing for 20 years The course is based on the close relationship between Steinbeck and the pioneer environmentalist and Monterey based marine biologist Throughout the College other faculty members and administrators add to the list of Kelley s accomplishments He has shown an unfaltering commitment to the Romberg Tiburon Center says Alissa Arp director of the RTC Geoff Marcy former SFSU physics and astronomy professor and CSU distinguished professor is grateful to Kelley for offering start up funds in 1986 to launch Marcy s search for planets Ten years later Marcy and his team received worldwide acclaim for discovering the first extra solar planets Were it not for Dean Kelley s stewardship of resources for SFSU science we humans might still be ignorant about the uniqueness of our solar system says Marcy who is now at UC Berkeley Jim Orenberg chair of Chemistry and Biochemistry notes Kelley s policy of providing faculty with additional assigned time to focus on research projects that have been awarded external grants He says this is just one example of Kelley s leadership style that has led to the College s success The best word I can think of to describe Jim is enlightened Orenberg adds He has trust faith and confidence in the chairs and faculty in general That style has been one of the main reasons for the College s growth and success under his tutelage Will Denetclaw who joined the SFSU biology faculty this year has been immediately impressed with the comfortable work environment Kelley creates for the College s faculty and staff He is very open and friendly I don t have to walk on eggshells with the higher ranking members of the College he says Ray Pestrong a longtime SFSU geology professor credits Kelley for rolling up his sleeves and digging ditches to get the Sierra Nevada Field Campus operational maintaining a strong connection with the California Academy of Sciences and supporting the Geosciences Department His support and encouragement at every stage

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/spring2001/specialtothisissue.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    I m already seeing a lot more smiles than I did before So far my expectations have been met I think the smiles emanate from a very simple concept You give people a stage on which they can perform and they take their initiative and run with it SFSU s students are a motivated intelligent lot our alumni are proof of that We have students who seek opportunities to realize their full potential so that they may better themselves as well as their community The College of Science and Engineering is dedicated to creating academically relevant work opportunities for our students Creating such opportunities is the main thrust of my job The vehicle we use to take our students to where they want to go is our Cooperative Education Program Its private public partnership at it s best Co op forms a mutually beneficial triad composed of the student the university and the employer It s definitely a win win win situation For students it s a chance to receive career development advising and a meaningful job where they can apply their classroom learning to real world challenges For the University it s a great recruiting and retention tool and

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/spring2001/advancement.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Enginering Alumni Chapter
    hors d oeuvres available Dr Wenshen Pong Associate Professor of Engineering enlightened the audience with his Physical Science lecture Innovative Seismic Engineering Design Dean Kelley left congratulated Carmela Jaravata middle a Cell and Molecular Biology graduate student on winning the first prize of 600 for her research in Myosins IIa VIa VII and IX May Be Involved in the Formation of the Phagocytic Cup By the Rat Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Franziska Jost right a Biochemistry graduate student received the second prize of 300 for her project entitled Alanine Scanning Analysis of The a I 3 4 Fucosyltransferase Motif Geeta Hompanur second right a CBLS graduate student won the third prize of 100 Her research was about Host Transcription Factor Interactions at the Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen Promoter On behalf of COSE alumni and students Mamdouh Abo El Ata Associate Dean for Development and Professor of Engineering left presented a farewell gift to Dean Kelley middle Lannie Nguyen Tang right holds a big card with good wishes from the event attendees Teammates Chigo Uzoigwe left and Jorge Morales Jr right are ready to talk to judges and attendees about their Steel Bridge project Other team members are Napoleon Calimlim II Thet Maung Pablo Miras and Jing Wong They are Civil Engineering undergraduate students Teammates Whitlon Joralemon left and Peter Leung right undergraduate students in Electrical Engineering are discussing strategies in presenting their project Design of Micromouse Divas Neupane a Biochemistry graduate student explains his research Synthesis and Evaluation of Model Cyclic Phosphonates as Putative Beta Lactamase Inhibitors to Student Judge Howard Chan right a graduate student from CBLS Jaime Diaz Sola a CBLS graduate student introduces his research on Complexed PSA for Diagnosing Prostate Cancer to a COSE student Ngoc Tran an undergraduate student in Chemistry is ready to

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/spring2001/event.html (2016-02-13)
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