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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    Dean of the College of Science and Engineering for the past twenty six years This scholarship will recognize and reward science and engineering students for outstanding academic achievement Dean Kelley has graciously offered to match all donations to this scholarship To honor one of its founding faculty members the School of Engineering faculty has created the René Marxheimer Memorial Scholarship fund This scholarship will be awarded to deserving students in the School of Engineering The generous donations from the Engineering faculty the Marxheimer Family and friends and alumni have totaled 4 000 almost halfway to the target of an endowment scholarship of 10 000 The College invites contributions for both of these scholarships and the ongoing Student Project Fund As you recall from the previous two issues of Science sfsu edu we are using this fund to reimburse students up to 500 for their out of pocket research project expenses In Spring 2001 the number of requests for reimbursement had doubled to 42 Since we have limited funds an average of 150 was rewarded to each proposal Please make checks payable to SFSU Foundation and send all donations to the SFSU College of Science Engineering 1600 Holloway Avenue San Francisco

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/spring2001/scholarships.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    Jr Assistant Professor of Biology earned his Ph D from U C Berkeley Denetclaw s research interests focus on the embryological development of muscle tissue in vertebrates Raymond Esquerra Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry earned his Ph D in Biophysical Chemistry from U C Santa Cruz His research interests include use of biophysical methods time solved photochemistry for investigating the physiological function of proteins and the molecular basis of disease Megumi Fuse Assistant Professor of Biology earned her Ph D in Zoology from university of Toronto Fuse s research interests focus on the neurophysiological control of metamorphosis in insects George Gassner Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry earned his Ph D in Biochemistry from the University of Michigan Ann Arbor His research focus is in the area of biochemistry studying protein ligand interactions from kinetic and thermodynamic perspectives Serkan Hosten Assistant Professor of Mathematics earned his Ph D in Operations Research from Cornell University Hosten s research interests include computational algebra discrete geometry algebraic geometry and integer programming Gretchen LeBuhn Assistant Profesor of Biology earned her Ph D in Plant Ecology from U C Santa Barbara LeBuhn s research interests focus on the evolutionary ecology of plant reproductive traits and conservation biology of plants Ronald Marzke Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy earned his Ph D in Astronomy from Harvard University Marzke s research interests include observational cosmology galaxy formation and evolution and the large scale structure of the universe Sally Pasion Assistant Professor of Biology earned her Ph D in Molecular Biology from U C Los Angeles Pasion s research interests focus on microbial genetics and the regulation of the cell cycle Our grant funded research continues to grow increasing beyond 20 million last year and our students and faculty continue to be involved in collaborative research with

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/fall2000/stateofthecollege.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    to stay home At the same time she tried to prepare herself for the future Time and money were the limiting factors so it was kind of luxurious to think about going back to school to get another degree Nevertheless Mary applied to U C Berkeley and San Francisco State University U C Berkeley did not accept applicants pursuing a second undergraduate degree However San Francisco State accepted her in the Computer Science Department Mary was very glad to have the opportunity to be a student again Most importantly it was the right school for her The campus was not too big so she did not feel lost Her classmates were friendly and helpful The class size was small and students respected their professors It has been a while since she graduated but all these years she always grateful for the fact that SFSU opened its door for her to pursue a different interest in her career Mary got a job in the Alameda Naval Air Station right after her graduation As soon as she settled down Joseph was thinking about his turn to fulfill his dream During that same year Joseph started his own small businesses Taking advantage of being bilingual he began with international trading Besides trading Joseph utilized his past work experiences to start warehousing and transportation operations For several years he struggled and managed all three businesses by himself Seven years ago the Alameda Naval Air Base announced that it would close down Even though Mary enjoyed her programming job very much and won various awards there she had to resign Meanwhile Joseph s businesses needed more assistance He was more than happy to have Mary work together with him They have been enjoying being partners in managing their successful businesses As they are approaching the

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/fall2000/alumnidomain.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    I love it here I am not working yet but have irons in the fire The predominant geology is very different here and I am having a good time learning new things Chris Rogers BS 88 Biology who has 12 years of professional experience in wetlands restoration design and implementation has joined the Oakland office of the Environmental Science Associates ESA as Project Manager and Senior Biologist His experience includes

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/fall2000/classnotes.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    which are compiled in a report prepared in 60 days specifying ways to save energy reduce waste and increase productivity By September 30 this year we have audited 200 diverse manufacturers The program provides an excellent opportunity for engineering students to develop important skills needed for their future professions Some of their duties include on site measurements of plant energy consumption evaluation of waste management gathering data from utility companies researching techniques for energy and waste reduction contacting vendors and estimating implementation costs and organizing and writing a professional engineering report Teamwork and communications are indispensable to a successful IAC assessment and students experience extensive practice in both Responsibility for leading the assessment and coordinating preparation of the reports is rotated among all team members thus providing a valuable exercise in project management to all The total value of the IAC contract thus far is approximately 1 300 000 Upon successful completion of work renewal of the contract adds about 160 000 each year Contributions from the College of Science and Engineering include space and a total of 33 FTEF matching time for the directors In its 8 years of operation the center has made a positive contribution to the

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/fall2000/labnotes.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Enginering Alumni Chapter
    she spent ten years as a lecturer at SFSU teaching nine different lower division math courses Those were exciting times The Math faculty at SFSU consisted of extremely gifted teachers knowledgeable and full of enthusiasm about their own specialties At the same time the enormous range in ability and preparation of the students she was teaching led her to Stanford to understand more about how people actually learn mathematics While at Stanford Judith soon learned that most research in mathematics education focused either on the elementary school or high school levels She was interested in college level mathematics learning so her focus at Stanford changed to a specialty called Mathematical Methods of Educational Research basically a hybrid of statistics and education Her advisor Ingram Olkin was a highly regarded prolific scholar in multivariate statistics Working with him opened up a whole new world of statistical consulting in various disciplines including Sociology Education Art and Government While continuing to teach math at SFSU she was now engaged almost continuously in consulting work as well as being a single parent with three active teenagers Judith finally finished college in August the year her first born entered college in September Dr Ekstrand s research at Stanford focused on new statistical methodologies to validate learning hierarchies with applications to mathematics learning These included developing and testing a linear structural equation model using correlation matrices based on math test scores of students from forty eight states in the U S One recommendation for improving the way we teach math that came from that early work namely to include more geometry subsequently has been incorporated in the current calculus reform movement After earning her Ph D Dr Ekstrand was hired at SFSU as an Assistant Professor within the area of Applied Mathematics Here she serves as

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/fall2000/specialtothisissue.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    expenses excluding airline tickets and food expenses The requests for financial support are overwhelming In Fall 1999 15 students submitted proposals requesting support totaling 16 000 We had funding to award 4 500 In Spring 2000 16 students submitted proposals requesting support in the amount of 18 000 We again had funding to award 4 400 This semester 21 students submitted proposals requesting support in the amount of 22 800 Since to date the last appeal raised 7 500 we were able to award 6 000 There is still a very great need among today s College of Science Engineering students for your support To expand the scope of the fund and to assist our students in the pursuit of their research work we ask you to give generously to the College An envelope has been enclosed in this issue of Science sfsu edu to assist you in making your gift Please note that you are able to direct your gift to support the Student Project Fund or the department or program of your choice If you recently received a letter from us asking you to support the Student Project Fund and already have done so please disregard this request

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/fall2000/advancement.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    insect has been known to use cooperative behavior to mimic other species says Hafernik who along with Saul Gershenz documented this behavior during the springs of 1992 and 1999 from the CSU Desert Studies Center According to the researchers once the triungulin mass successfully lures a male bee into pseudocopulation the larvae use pincher like limbs to attach themselves to the underside of the duped male who deposits the larvae on female bees during further mating attempts called venereal transmission By first attaching to a male bee triungulins have access to multiple females and subsequently the multiple nests of each female says Saul Gershenz The female bees then unwittingly transport these larvae back to their nests which they re busy provisioning with pollen and nectar for their own eggs Once inside the larvae parasitize the nest says Hafernik The provisions that would have produced a bee produce a beetle instead Bee eggs already in the nest cell are likely eaten by the larvae as well Blister beetles are named for their defensive mechanism of releasing a drop of bright orange blood laced with the chemical cantharidin which causes severe pain and blistering upon contact with the skin This substance is also used in the dubious aphrodisiac Spanish Fly which when ingested causes severe burning in the urinary tract The researchers believe the aggregations lure males into pseudocopulation through a combination of visual and olfactory cues They noted that triungulin masses position themselves on vegetation much like female bees perched on the top of a plant stem and males approach and land on masses and females in the same way To test for the possibility of olfactory cues the researchers placed fake aggregations near live aggregations that were formed or in the process of forming The male bees ignored the models

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/fall2000/blisterbeetles.html (2016-02-13)
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