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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    own field work or research That is because no money is allocated in the College s budget to support student projects With the cost of living in the Bay Area escalating annually just making ends meet and paying for their general education expenses is a growing challenge for many students The Student Project Fund reimburses students up to 500 for their out of pocket research project expenses excluding airline tickets and food expenses Last semester students submitted proposals requesting support totaling 16 000 We had funding to award grants totaling less than 5 000 This semester students submitted proposals requesting support in the amount of 18 000 again we had funding to award 4 100 Among those that received support last semester were student projects that investigated ways to improve the quality of water at San Francisco s Summit Reservoir on Twin Peaks studied whether algae might be effective in breaking down the contaminant MTBE in water supplies and controlled the valve train of internal combustion engine through electrical techniques Funding for the Student Project Fund comes from recent donors to the University s Annual Fund who earmarked their gifts for the College of Science and Engineering To expand the scope of the fund and to assist our students in the pursuit of their research work we ask you to give generously to the College Please note that you are able to direct your gift to support the Student Project Fund or the department or program of your choice For more information about College of Science Engineernig Programs alumni events and ways to support the College please contact Lannie Nguyen Tang director of alumni development at 415 338 7662 or email science sfsu edu If you recently received a letter from us asking you to support the Student Project Fund

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/spring2000/advancement.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    by computer software Depths are colored coded from light tan shallow area near coast Detailed data are not available for the area west of the black line using data obtained from sonar surveys 2 earthquakes around the world via a U S Geological Survey web site that is continually updated with maps of the most recent worldwide locations depths and magnitudes 3 wave heights in the open and coastal ocean via web sites that show real time data that is conditions in the ocean right now 4 the equatorial Pacific to view temperature and wind conditions and predict upcoming El Niño or La Niña events via a NOAA web site with real time data from moored buoys Students enjoy using computers to gain access to the same data sets used by scientists Many web sites provide computer enhancements that help to comprehend the data For example sea surface temperatures are shown in false colors to provide a complete picture of ocean variations Earthquakes are color coded by depth so that areas with the deepest earthquakes can be easily identified In these ways basic earth observations are used to explore the processes that have formed and continue to shape our planet In many of our introductory geology classes instructors use interactive software as a tool to help students understand large scale plate tectonic processes Software applications include animations of processes such as sea floor spreading and plate subduction that cannot possibly be viewed directly Students go to web sites that show where and in which tectonic setting volcanoes have recently erupted They visit museums to see fossil collections from many different environments Virtual field trips created by geologists and displayed on web sites enable students to visit classic localities and view faults landforms and other features around the world To get

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/spring2000/geosciences.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    of the College Nathan Smith Geology second from the left explains his work on earthquake activities in Central Nevada Nathan won the 600 First Prize for his project titled Paleoseismic Activity along the Stillwater Gap Segment of the Dixie Valley Fault Evidence from Tectonic Geomorphology in Alluvial Fans near the Sou Hills Central Nevada Dr Mamdouh Abo El Ata Associate Dean for Development congratulates Greg King the project manager of The Design and Development of a Human Powered Vehicle and his teammate Anthony Karam on winning the 300 Second Prize Team members include Luc Asbury Che De La Jolla Adam Fernandez Timothy Kuan Irwan Koswara Aster Mahari Tonderai Nyachoto Steve Reedy Robert Taraya Laura Yee All team members are Mechanical and Electrical Engineering students Sitting by the display Tonia Tabucchi Civil Engineering left listens to her teammate abc explain the creation of their Concrete Canoe They received the 100 Third Prize Other group members are Jonathan Pascua Jonathon Manansang Robert Gray Scott Hua Daud Shirzai James Kelley Dean of the College of Science Engineering right front row and the audience enjoy the lecture on Diversity complexity and ecology Weaving it all together with food webs by Dr Neo Martinez Associate

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/spring2000/event.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    and after the remodeling project will add to our biomedical teaching and research complex primarily funded by the National Institutes of Health We have also had unprecedented success in grant income in the past few months In September and October alone we received almost 7 million in new research funding much of it coming to the Romberg Tiburon Center our teaching and research station focussing on San Francisco Bay We are the only university in the Bay Area with such a facility devoted to working on understanding the health of the Bay and its importance to the quality of life in the Bay Area The Advisory Board for the college has been particularly active this year The Board has raised nearly 100 thousand to support scholarships for graduate students in the College and this year we made two awards The recipients were Christa Speekman a student in Marine Biology and Constance Ganong a student in Evolutionary Biology Last year s recipient Cheryl Thompson is currently in the Ph D program in molecular biology at Harvard This fall we welcomed three new members to the faculty Arek Goetz in Dynamical Systems in Applied Mathematics Alex Schuster in Complex Analysis and Bruce

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/fall1999/stateofthecollege.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    guest lectures Cagle believes her education at SFSU prepared her very well for her future career choices because of the rigor associated with the science courses Intensive immersion into science and math courses gave her the opportunity to hold her study and discipline skills which she was able to use in her varied career Key to the learning experience was SFSU s faculty who helped make the subjects interesting and relevant Like so many students Cagle was fortunate to have Naomi Nmerole an SFSU Nursing professor as one of her mentors Cagle recalled that professor Nmerole volunteered to go to Africa to provide nursing care in areas where care was desperately needed Unfortunately Nmerole contracted Maleria and died Her death had a profound impact on Cagle and she began to think about remote medicine and practicing in areas where new medical technologies were not available Cagle s mentor taught her that teaching is not just something that should stay in a classroom but rather that what is learned should be shared with all who might benefit For Cagle life at SFSU was not always centered around classes and study She was often found in the Theater Arts building listening to a musician practice or watching a recital of a theater production The close urban environment of SFSU was definitely and advantage In giving advice to those who want to pursue a career in the medical and space fields Cagle stresses the importance of building the tools as early as possible as early as middle grade but definitely in high school Students should take as many math and science courses as possible to lay the foundation for college s higher level The importance of a well rounded education should not be lost however as Cagle strongly believes that scientific study should

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/fall1999/alumnidomain.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    is the artist in residence at San Francisco State University When asked from your perspective what have been some of the most important developments of the 20th century and how will the world be different 100 years from now Handy answered being born in 1933 and remembering that in Dallas they were starting to replace horse drawn delivery wagons with trucks reminds me of how far transportation has developed We actually owned a Model T Ford and a Hupmobile We did a lot of traveling hauling itinerant farm workers mainly poor whites It was like The Grapes of Wrath We d see these people on the highways with everything the owned saying Go back There is no work The cars now are so advanced but you can t haul as many people because there are no running boards for them to stand on The cars are so sleek and fast now they have trains in Japan that go 150 miles an hour I was on one and I was totally petrified I project that we will have satellites in space on which people will live if you call it that We ll have people stupid enough to take that trip Handy just celebrated a release of his newest CD on the Boulevard with the Class Robert Kawasaki BS 70 Civil Engineering was appointed by the Calaveras County Board of Supervisors to his new post as the Calaveras County Director of Public Works Road Commissioner and County Surveyor Kawasaki has been a registered engineer since 1975 and a Director of Public Works City Engineer for the City of Galt since 1985 As the new Director Kawasaki will oversee the operations of the county surveying department solid waste and recycling programs and related items Michael A Kruge BA 80 Geology a geology

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/fall1999/classnotes.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    built more than 15 000 wheelchairs All over the world people with disabilities are increasingly refusing to be defined by their traditional roles of dependence helplessness and isolation A modern wheelchair has the potential to bring about a social transformation Mobility means that people with disabilities can achieve self determination and self reliance that they can overcome the expectation that they have no future In order to gain self sufficiency however the world s poor majority needs a wheelchair that is affordable easy to repair locally and appropriate to local needs and conditions It is these chairs Ralf Hotchkiss has been designing and building for the past thirty years making no compromises in the effectiveness of the wheelchairs yet finding ways to build and maintain them at a very low cost San Francisco State University is honoring Professor Hotchkiss extraordinary achievements and contributions in this field by establishing the Ralf Hotchkiss Chair in Appropriate Technology for Disability in the University s College of Science and Engineering It is the first academic chair in the United States devoted as Professor Hotchkiss work has been to the intersection of disability the design of appropriate technology and engineering from a humanistic perspective Professor Ralf Hotchkiss Ralf Hotchkiss attended SFSU in 1970 s has been a designer inventor and builder of wheeled mobility devices for thirty years Through Whirlwind Wheelchair International he has devoted himself to teaching wheelchair riders in developing countries how to build sturdy inexpensive and adaptable wheelchairs out of locally available materials Professor Hotchkiss is the recipient of the prestigious MacArthur Fellowship the Henry B Betts Award for his work to improve the lives of people with disabilities and the Chrysler Corporation s Innovation in Design Award His alma mater Oberlin College awarded him an honorary Doctor of Science degree in 1991 He was inducted to the San Francisco State University Alumni Hall of Fame in 1995 Professor Hotchkiss is a Senior Research Scientist at San Francisco State University s School of Engineering and Technical Director of Whirlwind Wheelchair International The Ralf Hotchkiss Chair With the establishment of the Ralf Hotchkiss Chair San Francisco State University affirms its strong commitment to the importance of research and scholarship in the field of appropriate technology for people with disabilities The Chair emphasizes the humanistic aspects of design and combines rehabilitation engineering and appropriate technology Appropriate technology is defined as the best technology that can be had given the limited resources available to the majority of the population in developing countries as well as the poorer populations in the industrialized nations Rehabilitation engineering is the formalized area of study concerned with research development and adaptation of technology for use by people with disabilities The establishment of the Ralf Hotchkiss Chair will reinforce the activities of the School of Engineering at SFSU in the field of Rehabilitation Engineering Since 1987 the School of Engineering has participated with the Department of Rehabilitation Counseling in an innovative certificate program to train interdisciplinary teams of engineers technologists counselors

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/fall1999/labnotes.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Newsletters of the SFSU College of Science & Engineering Alumni Chapter
    s Alumni Association for two terms from 1995 1997 Since July 1998 Goldstein has served as Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at Sonoma State University Dr Goldstein has received a number of honors in appreciation for his involvement and commitment to higher education including the California State Student Association Trustee of the Year 1996 SFSU Alumni Hall of Fame 1994 SFSU Alumnus of the Year 1986 and in both 1971 and 1975 he was named Outstanding Educator of America Many people recognize Goldstein as founder of the SFSU s popular Human Sexuality biology course one of the first such courses in the nation I always believed during my college days that it would be exciting to have a course that talked about human sexuality for what it really is he said Not just the biological foundations of it but the feelings that people have which are equally important the connection between the emotions and the cognitive ability to evaluate erotic stimuli For Goldstein his work in examining the direction and shape of CSU s future to better serve the people of California was one of the highlights of his distinguished career Cornerstones as the plan was called involved trustees faculty students alumni staff administrators and community members making it a most cohesive and consultative planning effort The last paragraph of the Cornerstones report stated Cornerstones is a plan then about how we work in support of our students our state and the future we share It calls for both continuity and creativity We must continue doing what we do superbly well and push ourselves beyond the most comfortable parts of our traditions As an expert in his field Goldstein has been a frequent guest on Bay Area talk shows and has consulted on writings about human reproduction and

    Original URL path: http://www.sfsu.edu/%7Escience/newsletters/fall1999/specialtothisissue.html (2016-02-13)
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