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  • Consortium for the Barcode of Life
    CBOL Find out how you can get involved Learn about major CBOL projects and other barcode initiatives Browse Case Studies of barcoding projects Propose a barcoding project post a Case Study and find partners Submit barcode data Examine barcode data Join CBOL Sponsor Links Site Map Explore CBOL What is CBOL News Updates History of CBOL CBOL Members Structure Executive Committee Working Groups Scientific Advisory Board CBOL Secretariat Mission and

    Original URL path: http://barcoding.si.edu/sitemap.html (2015-06-03)
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  • Consortium for the Barcode of Life
    than 100 institutions from more than 40 countries are now CBOL Member Organizations Join CBOL so that your organization can be a part of the Barcode Initiative Join a Barcoding Campaign Fish Barcode of Life FishBOL initiative launched in June 2005 aims to barcode all 28 000 species of marine and freshwater fish species in five years All Birds Barcoding Initiative ABBI took flight at its inagural workshop at Harvard University in September 2005 ABBI s goal is to barcode all 10 000 species of birds by 2010 CBOL s International Network for Barcoding Invasive and Pest Species INBIPS is made up of researchers and representatives of government agencies They re exchanging information and developing plans for global barcoding projects Join a Barcoding Project Review our case studies to connect with research partners like you Starting your own barcoding project Attract research partners by submitting a case study that CBOL will put on this website Use established Barcoding protocols standards You can participate in the global Barcode Initiative by using the following standard protocols developed by CBOL Laboratory Protocols and Equipment Recommendations pdf 561Kb developed by CBOL s DNA Working Group Data Standards pdf 30Kb for barcode records in GenBank

    Original URL path: http://barcoding.si.edu/get_involved.html (2015-06-03)
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  • BankIt
    Barcode sets complete your most recent incomplete submission download a flat file summary of completed submissions How does the tool work with My NCBI My NCBI is a central place to customize NCBI Web services The Barcode Submission tool associates your Barcode submissions with your My NCBI user name and remembers your contact information to expedite future Barcode submissions Barcode also associates your most recent incomplete submission with your My NCBI username so that if you re interrupted while submitting a Barcode set you can complete the submission later To register for My NCBI follow the link at the bottom of this page to Sign in to Use Barcode Submission Tool and click register for an account on the My NCBI Sign In page Read My NCBI Help for more information about My NCBI In order to ensure that the My NCBI user currently using the Barcode Submission tool is the person submitting the Barcode set you will be prompted for your My NCBI user name and password before you begin a Barcode submission What is needed to submit a Barcode set A My NCBI Account register on My NCBI Sign In page A web browser that supports both JavaScript

    Original URL path: http://barcoding.si.edu/website%20links/BankIt.htm?tool=barcode (2015-06-03)
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  • Consortium for the Barcode of Life
    voucher specimens and associated biological information The formation of barcoding projects that will contribute an accelerating flow of barcode records into the public database The solution of technical logistical and structural problems encountered by researchers and users in the Barcode of Life Initiative The development of new technologies that will make DNA barcoding faster more accurate more portable and less expensive The involvement of researchers and users of barcode data from all regions of the world especially those with high biodiversity The development of intellectual activity involving DNA barcode data in the wider academic community among diverse users throughout society Greater awareness of DNA barcoding beyond taxonomic researchers and The use of barcode data for the benefit of science and society CBOL s Strategy The CBOL Secretariat will pursue its mission by identifying and catalyzing international partnerships among the following stakeholders in barcoding The Taxonomic Community Natural history museums herbaria zoos aquaria and universities and the taxonomists that work therein The User Community Governmental and intergovernmental agencies conservation organizations and other NGOs private sector companies and other organizations that use taxonomic information in pursuit of their applied missions The Service Community Research organizations and private sector companies in the areas

    Original URL path: http://barcoding.si.edu/mission_strategy.html (2015-06-03)
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  • Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL)
    by providing logistical and financial support In partnership with the Chairs of the Working Groups the CBOL Secretariat helps in developing submitting and managing those applications for funding that are necessary to support ambitious The initial Working Groups are devoted to DNA Database Plants Data Analysis and Technology Development The Executive Committee has sole authority to convene new Working Groups and to disestablish existing ones CBOL has the following five

    Original URL path: http://barcoding.si.edu/CBOLWorkingGroups.htm (2015-06-03)
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  • Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL)
    and Pest Species INBIPS is an informal network of individuals who would like to share information coordinate their efforts and form collaborations that address the IAS problem There are already numerous initiatives devoted to invasive species and INBIPS plans to work with them rather than to create a new and separate activity INBIPS goal is to provide these initiatives with information about the application of DNA barcoding to the IAS

    Original URL path: http://barcoding.si.edu/INBIPS.htm (2015-06-03)
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  • Consortium for the Barcode of Life
    for land plants Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 106 12794 12797 The paper includes contributions from 52 researchers representing 25 institutions and compares the performance of seven candidate barcoding loci rpoC1 rpoB rbcL matK trnH psbA atpF atpH psbK psbI These were assessed against the following three criteria Criterion 1 Which loci show greatest universality This was tackled via a combination of pooling universality results from different laboratories and de novo generated sequences at the University of Guelph For angiosperms the results were based on directly comparable sequencing trials of the seven regions using a single primer pair per locus for 170 species This work was coordinated by Mehrdad Hajibabaei University of Guelph using these protocols For gymnosperms and cryptogams which often require different primer sets the results are based on pooled data from several laboratories Criterion 2 Which loci are most amenable to bi directional sequencing with few or no ambiguous base calls Assessments of sequence trace quality were based on de novo generated sequences from 190 land plant samples at the University of Guelph Sequence quality assessments of the resulting trace files were undertaken by Sujeevan Ratnasingham in collaboration with Mehrdad Hajibabaei Criterion 3 Which loci enable most species to be distinguished Assessments of species discrimination were based on pooled sequence data from several laboratories with the aim of maximising representation of samples trialled for all seven candidate barcoding loci The data analyses were carried out by Damon Little New York Botanic Garden and John Spouge NCBI in collaboration with Laura Forrest Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh The scripts used by Damon Little in analysing the data are available online Based on these results and subsequent discussions the majority preference was to recommend portions of the genes rbcL matK to form the core barcode for land plants The decision was a close call as the candidate loci each have different strengths and weaknesses It is recognised that individual research groups may choose to supplement this core barcode with additional loci WHERE CAN I FIND MORE INFORMATION ABOUT LABORATORY PROTOCOLS AND THE REGIONS THAT ARE RECOMMENDED AS THE PLANT BARCODE The following document summarises currently available protocols and information IS FURTHER PROTOCOL DEVELOPMENT REQUIRED FOR rbcL matK Yes For matK greatest success was obtained in the Guelph sequencing trials with the 3F 1R primers designed by Ki Joong Kim Korea University see Reaction Conditions Further primer development work is required in non angiosperms for matK particularly for cryptogamic plants and it is recognised that the 3F 1R primers will not work in all angiosperms Protocol development to enhance amplification strategies for matK including the development of new primers and primer cocktails is underway at laboratories including the University of Guelph New York Botanic Garden and Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh Additional community efforts to enhance plant barcoding protocols are encouraged If CBOL approves the rbcL matK barcode we will establish an online forum to coordinate protocol development and the sharing of information to promote this development WHAT ARE

    Original URL path: http://barcoding.si.edu/plant_working_group.html (2015-06-03)
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  • Consortium for the Barcode of Life
    Foundation NSF where he directed a variety of funding programs that provided support for research in systematic biology improving facilities and constructing specimen databases in natural history museums and herbaria improving elementary school science education major research instrumentation interdisciplinary research centers and strategic evaluation During 1997 Dr Schindel worked in the U S Senate as a Brookings Institution LEGIS Fellow in the office of Senator Jeff Bingaman D NM From 1998 to 2004 Dr Schindel served as the National Science Foundation s European representative based in the US Embassy in Paris Dr Schindel can be contacted at telephone 202 633 0812 fax 202 633 2938 portable 202 557 1149 Email David Schindel Office address National Museum of Natural History Room CE 119 10th Constitution Avenue NW Washington DC 20560 Mailing address National Museum of Natural History Smithsonian Institution P O Box 37012 MRC 105 Washington DC 20013 7012 Meg Fritzsche Administrator Ms Fritzsche joined the Secretariat from within the Smithsonian She spent one year at the Smithsonian s Office of Sponsored Projects working in grant administration Prior to the Smithsonian Ms Fritzsche spent three years teaching high school English in Japan She graduated from DePauw University where she majored in Art History and minored in French and Asian Studies She gained experience in international relations while living in France and Japan Ms Fritzsche can be contacted at telephone 202 633 0808 fax 202 633 2938 Email Meg Fritzsche Office address National Museum of Natural History Room CE 116 10th Constitution Avenue NW Washington DC 20560 Mailing address National Museum of Natural History Smithsonian Institution P O Box 37012 MRC 105 Washington DC 20013 7012 Mike Trizna Data Management Support Specialist Mike recently completed his Masters in bioinformatics from Virginia Commonwealth University He has been working full time as data management

    Original URL path: http://barcoding.si.edu/secretariat.html (2015-06-03)
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