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  • Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL)
    is launching the Barcode of Life Initiative an emerging collaborative effort to promote a process enabling the rapid and inexpensive identification of the estimated 10 million species of Earth s fauna and flora The Smithsonian s National Museum of Natural History host of the Secretariat for the Consortium held this organizational meeting of the Barcode of Life Consortium on May 24 2004 Meeting Minutes Meeting Participants Click here for more

    Original URL path: http://barcoding.si.edu/Event_May2004Meeting.htm (2015-06-03)
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  • Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL)
    LCD Bursary Recipient Lunch Gathering with CBOL Secretariat Session 2 How will and has DNA barcoding been used Chair Wouter Los 1430 1600 A model for a global inventory of ants a case study in Madagascar Brian Fisher Wedding biodiversity inventory of a large complex Lepidoptera fauna with DNA barcoding details and results Dan Janzen The BioCode MOOREA project beyond the barcode Neil Davies 1630 1730 Fish and barcodes uses and early results from Australian marine fish Bob Ward Barcodes for biosecurity evaluation as a standardised method for the identification of quarantine pests Shelley Ball Barcoding the potential use in regulatory science Haile Yancy Day Two 7 February 2005 Session 3 Practicalities of barcoding Chair Ann Bucklin 0930 1100 The problem with plants issues and possible solutions Mark Chase Applying coxI based genetic barcoding to macroalgae of the subkingdom Rhodoplantae and other under appreciated protists a preliminary appraisal holds promise for future applications Gary Saunders DNA barcoding in fungi moving from the culture collection into the field and the medical lab Richard Summerbell 1130 1300 Molecular barcodes for meiofaunal diversity delimiting taxa Mark Blaxter The unholy trinity Barcoding taxonomy and species boundaries Rob DeSalle DNA barcodes a strategy for species identification in flowering plants John Kress Session 4 Technical aspects Databases Chair Nick Goldman 1430 1545 Video capture and editing microscopy allows fast and informative vouchering of individual nematodes prior to DNA amplification Paul De Ley Protocols for the high volume assembly of DNA barcodes Mehrdad Hajibabaei Application of the barcode of life as QC for the Ambrose Monell Cryo Collection at the American Museum of Natural History Angelique Corthals 1615 1745 Barcode database requirements lessons from the integrated primate biomaterials and information resource Robert Hanner Barcode sequences at GenBank Scott Federhen Library and laboratory the marriage of research data

    Original URL path: http://barcoding.si.edu/ConferencePresentations.htm (2015-06-03)
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  • Second International Barcode Of Life Conference: Taipei Sept 07
    Pyrosequencing device for DNA sequencing Mostafa Ronaghi Stanford University 5 45 6 00 Open discussion between audience and speakers DAY 2 WEDNESDAY 19 SEPTEMBER 2007 SESSION 5 ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR BARCODE DATA Moderator Javier Cabrera Rutgers University 8 30 8 45 Introduction Michel Veuille Museum National d Histoire Naturel Paris presentation 8 45 9 00 Comparing phylogenetic and statistical classification methods for DNA barcoding Frederic Austerlitz CNRS AgroParisTech Universite Paris Sud 9 00 9 15 Fast Barcode Based Species Identification Using String Kernels Vladimir Pavlovic Rutgers University presentation 9 15 9 30 Species Classification with Optimized Logic Formulas Giovanni Felici Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche presentation 9 30 9 45 DNA Barcode sequence identification incorporating taxonomic hierarchy and within taxon variability Damon Little The New York Botanical Garden presentation 9 45 10 00 A Comparison of Algorithms for Species Identification based on DNA barcodes Bogdan Pasaniuc University of Connecticut presentation 10 00 10 30 Open discussion between audience and speakers 10 30 11 00 COFFEE BREAK SESSION 6 CASE STUDIES I INTEGRATIVE TAXONOMIC STUDIES USING DNA BARCODING Moderator Shen Horn Yen National Sun Yat Sen University Taiwan 11 00 11 20 Barcoding Biogeography and Evolution in the Tropics of the New World Biff Bermingham STRI Panama presentation 11 20 11 40 The role of DNA Barcoding in the broader context of Integrative Taxonomy Benoit Dayrat University of California Merced presentation 11 40 12 00 The role of DNA Barcoding in the broader context of Integrative Taxonomy Benoit Dayrat University of California Merced presentation 12 00 12 20 Sphingids and Barcodes The New Taxonomy Rodolphe Rougerie University of Guelph presentation 12 00 12 20 Bamboozled by bloodsuckers barcoding backs biodiversity Mark Siddall American Museum of Natural History presentation 12 20 12 30 Open discussion between audience and speakers 12 30 2 00 LUNCH Group photo at front gate of Academia Sinica SESSION 7 WHAT NEW SCIENCE WILL WE SEE AT THE THIRD BARCODE CONFERENCE Moderator Cecilia Saccone CNR Bari Italy 2 00 2 20 Barcoding and biodiversity research Les Christidis Australian Museum presentation 2 20 2 40 Ecological inventory with a barcorder the ecological taxascope who eats what in a complex tropical forest Dan Janzen University of Pennsylvania presentation 2 40 3 40 Panel discussion What new research can we do with a MILLION Barcode records Paul De Barro CSIRO Australia Peter Ng National University of Singapore Axel Meyer University of Konstanz Robert Andersen Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences 3 40 4 00 COFFEE BREAK SESSION 8 CASE STUDIES II DNA BARCODING IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES Moderator Helida Oyieke National Museums of Kenya 4 00 4 20 DNA Barcoding considerations for vectors of neglected diseases Daniel Masiga ICIPE Nairobi Kenya presentation 4 20 4 40 All Birds Barcoding Initiative in the Neotropics Identifying and discovering bird species in the richest avifauna of the World Pablo Tubaro National Museum of Natural History Argentina presentation 4 40 5 00 FISH BOL and Barcoding in India Wazir Lakra National Bureau of Fish Genetic Resources India presentation

    Original URL path: http://barcoding.si.edu/cbol_taipei/ (2015-06-03)
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  • Consortium for the Barcode of Life
    data Examine barcode data Join CBOL Sponsor Links Executive Committee Dr Scott E Miller Chair Smithsonian Institution Office of the Under Secretary for Science 1000 Jefferson Drive SW Suite 230 MRC 009 PO Box 37012 Washington D C 20013 7012 United States Dr David E Schindel Executive Secretary Consortium for the Barcode of Life National Museum of Natural History Room CE 119 10th and Constitution Avenue NW Washington DC 20560

    Original URL path: http://barcoding.si.edu/executive_committee.html (2015-06-03)
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  • Consortium for the Barcode of Life
    Barcoding Global Biodiversity Information Facility GBIF Catalogue of Life Search Sitemap text size Get Involved in CBOL Find out how you can get involved Learn about major CBOL projects and other barcode initiatives Browse Case Studies of barcoding projects Propose a barcoding project post a Case Study and find partners Submit barcode data Examine barcode data Join CBOL Sponsor Links Loading Map CBOL Member locations Learn more about each CBOL

    Original URL path: http://barcoding.si.edu/member_map.html (2015-06-03)
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  • Consortium for the Barcode of Life
    other appropriate purposes see DAWG s Program of Work Moreover the Data Analysis Working Group will take the lead in developing tools for analyzing barcode data and in making these tools widely available As the Barcode Database grows this group will provide an increasingly useful resource for studying the dynamics of genetic variation within and among species The new Data Analysis Working Group invites researchers from population geneticists statisticians bioinformaticists applied mathematicians and computational biologists to join This Working Group is chaired by Michel Veuille Director of the Department of Systematics and Evolution in the National Museum of Natural History Paris Database Working Group The mission of the Database Working Group is to develop an open archive for DNA barcode sequences We are currently working in collaboration with the NIH National Center for Biotechnology Information NCBI Sequence submissions to the barcode database include raw trace files and computed quality scores Barcode reference sequences are derived from voucher specimens in accessible collections and thus include specimen identifiers as well as a core subset of the voucher specimen s annotation Linkages to the full specimen records also exist where ancillary specialty databases are available online NCBI is developing a web based tool to facilitate the bulk submission of Barcode data to populate this emerging new archive within GenBank Chair Robert Hanner University of Guelph Ontario Canada DNA Working Group The mission of the DNA Working Group is to provide the research community with tested and standardized approaches to barcoding The DNA working Group has the primary mission of identifying protocols that reduce costs speed analysis or aid barcode recovery from difficult specimens This includes developing testing discussing and promoting protocols for acquiring genetic barcode sequences from diverse specimens including older preserved museum specimens and recommending the equipment and procedures required to do

    Original URL path: http://barcoding.si.edu/working_groups.html (2015-06-03)
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  • Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL)
    the National Academy of Sciences DNA Barcoding Promise and Pitfalls October 2004 Craig Moritz and Carla Cicero PLoS Biology Ten Species in One DNA Barcoding Reveals Cryptic Species in the Neotropical Skipper Butterfly Astraptes fulgerator October 12 2004 Paul Hebert Erin Penton John Burns Daniel Janzen Winnie Hallwachs Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Identification of Birds Through DNA Barcodes September 28 2004 Paul Hebert Mark Stoeckle Tyler Zemlak

    Original URL path: http://barcoding.si.edu/DNABackgroundPubs.htm (2015-06-03)
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  • Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL)
    2005 John Harvard s Journal Scanning Species June 3 2005 Volume 30 Science DNA barcoding a useful tool for taxonomists response to DNA barcoding is no substitute for taxonomy May 5 2005 Volume 435 Nature Barcoding the Planet March 23 2005 Vol 3 Spotlight on Science Will DNA Bar Codes Breathe Life into Classification February 18 2005 Volume 307 Science Handheld DNA Scanners to ID Species Instantly January 26 2005 National Geographic News Body doubles Cryptic species as we discover more examples of species that are morphologically indistinguishable we need to ask why and how they exist January 15 2005 Volume 433 Nature Scanner für alles Lebendige January 2005 Der Spiegel A Species in a Second Promise of DNA Bar Codes December 14 2004 The New York Times The Power and Perils of Molecular Taxonomy a Case Study of Eyeless and Endangered Cicurina Araneae Dictynidae from Texas Caves November 2004 Volume 13 Molecular Ecology DNA Bar Codes Life under the Scanner December 4 2004 Volume 166 Science News Compiling a Catalog of Life of Earth October 2004 Volume 26 Popular Science DNA Barcoders Nab New Species September 27 2004 Science Barcode Me June 26 2004 New Scientist ScienceScope Gift Lifts

    Original URL path: http://barcoding.si.edu/DNAMediaCoverage.htm (2015-06-03)
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