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  • General Advice | SLU LAW
    a close friend a study buddy or even your mom and tell them about your stress over law school Sometimes a stiff upper lip isn t going to help the situation in fact it may only increase the pressure you already feel If you are concerned about grades midterms outlines etc try to talk it out You are then better able to face the reality of the situation But you must face the reality of the situation because you need to know your strengths and weaknesses So ask yourself if you have to read the cases three times just to figure out what the issue is Do you have to take verbatim notes and then spend an hour a night reviewing in order to figure out what the professor is talking about Do you find yourself wasting too much time between classes You need to know how you study and when you study best Moreover not facing that reality can cause you to rely upon unworkable solutions for your situation Students who do not succeed often have plans it s just that those plans aren t solving their problems in answering law exams One preliminary thing you might want to consider is to take the Meyer Briggs test in Career Services The test will help you identify your learning style a first step in learning how to make necessary changes But you will also need to review those semester exams especially the bad ones Figure out what you did wrong and what you did right Talk to the professor get his or her input This is especially true if you are in a two semester course you do not want to repeat the same mistakes Use the handout at the end of this article to spark the discussion and pinpoint where you went wrong Remember you can t fix it unless you know what you did incorrectly Then get back to basics Remember that law school is a continuum first you brief properly then you take good notes then you review and synthesize every day week moreover you start learning the chunks of information that the professor has completed and outline to create a whole while you learn the relationships and parts which will help you develop a checklist and strategy for answering factual issues which you can use to practice and further learn so that you will do well on the exam So first keep up with your reading Brief do all the stuff that you are supposed to do Not every student is given the same ability to read complicated material and properly analyze it so you must do what is necessary Getting behind will never help Start with your four hours course followed by the alternatively spaced classes Stop by Academic Advising for handouts and advice regarding changing your briefing technique to make it more efficient and focused But try to refrain from minimal book briefing which will not give you the necessary analytic preparation for class What else Use tutors and or study groups whenever you find that you are lost regarding an issue Sometimes the light isn t going to go on without help Look around and try to find a fellow student who seems to follow the class Don t be afraid to ask him her to meet with you on a regular basis Surprisingly many will say yes after all it is also a way for them to review and test their knowledge However always be ready to offer pay although generally none is accepted As an alternative ask your professor if he she knows any second year students who were particularly successful in that class However as a word of caution don t use people who think exactly like you If you are a detail person look for someone who can see the big picture and vice versa Try to utilize your skills while getting something from the group More importantly make the study group time count this is not a gossip session In addition be ready to rely on other sources to get the idea of what you are talking about Think about understanding the general stuff what does Marbury mean despite many readings If you get the general ideas explained to you you can then begin to start developing your analysis from there However this does not mean that you can rely on some secondary study aid as the key to everything You need to participate in the process or you will simply be memorizing without context or understanding So the moral is use study aids for the general understanding never rely upon these books as the source of all wisdom More importantly get away from the one size fits all notion All professors view things differently They are not going to all teach the course identically nor are they equally interested in policy or a breakdown of the different judges philosophies So don t make the mistake of thinking that mastering one professor in one class means that you have mastered the rest You also need to use your time well Use weekends to your advantage Read ahead over weekends if possible You will find that if the daily pressure of reading for the next day s assignment is somewhat diminished your lessened stress level will allow for more concentrated learning Use the time between classes for the final read of the next class assignment not the first read This will help you focus on what the professor will be talking about in class You need to be prepared for class because you should participate You also become directly involved in the thinking process when you contribute in class Most professors will agree that beyond learning the substantive law the Socratic method also requires that you learn to do legal analysis which requires both inductive thinking gleaning the rule from a number of cases and deductive thinking applying that rule to a new set of facts By participating in class you will gain experience in thinking like a lawyer After all you don t want your first experience of analytical thinking to be during your examinations Never miss class obvious but true Skipping classes that you don t follow will never help you see the light If you do miss class make sure you get good notes from a fellow classmate If possible ask someone who tends to take verbatim notes Then you will have a better sense of what was going on during that class Work with teachers Ask questions if you need help Try to use teachers as your second source after discussing trouble areas with your fellow students Professors have office hours use them As you start to outline come up with strategies on how to approach problems involving those rules A former medical person now law student noted that in medicine one starts by elimination it s not that or that Here you want to begin by what it is but what it is must be in order Think of finding the rules as listing the ingredients and following a recipe you need to start with step one do this stuff first then add that and then finally bring it all together When you outline don t just list the rules of law try to come up with a way you would analyze a problem Ask yourself what facts play into the general principles because rules only apply under certain circumstances Think of personal jurisdiction or a motion to dismiss stating a rule is not enough You need to know when it s applicable under what set of facts So figure that out in your outline Visualize concepts that are not clear to you Not everyone can see the law from an outline If you don t understand what makes minimum contacts in a civil procedure long arm statute diagram or draw the elements Make a chart listing the different points Use what you can do help yourself think the law Eat well exercise sleep enough Stress intensifies if your basic needs are not met If you are having problems see someone SLU has health services that include psychological testing Finally practice practice and practice Ask yourself hypotheticals when you have a few spare minutes Review the rules as you drive to school Practice taking old examinations after your outline is finished The more you utilize analytic skills and memorize the laws and rules to be applied the more adept you will be during the actual examinations Again don t be discouraged if your grades are not up to your expectations Be willing to work consistently be willing to change and you can have a much more satisfying second semester Study Aids in Law School The majority of law students do use study aids at one point or another during their first year of law school Study aids can be very helpful to you if you use them appropriately Moreover there are ways to misuse study aids to your detriment Study aids should never be a replacement for doing your own work during law school Study aids are materials other than your casebook that help explain the law Most professors take is to read the casebook brief the cases attend class listen take notes answer and ask questions and consult with your professors when you need further clarification If you ve done all that and still do not understand the material you may decide to turn to a study aid Study aids are not a substitute for doing the hard work yourself because working with the material even when it is difficult is essential to understanding Moreover students often mistakenly believe that a generic brief outline or analysis reflects their professor s prospective of the law Keep in mind that different professors look at different aspects of a subject even their choice of language can be different from the commercial aids On the other hand reading a study aid may be all that s needed to pull together all of the work you ve done It can be like the proverbial light bulb going on in your head after you ve read someone else s explanation of the material Study aids can be especially useful to double check your understanding of the material as you prepare your course outlines The types of books that you can buy run from stripped down flowcharts and outlines to huge treatises Between hornbooks and commercial outlines there is another category of study aids that offer explanations of the law but in less detail than a hornbook Overall these aids cover every traditional first year course and many upper level courses as well Today I want to cover the most common Hornbooks Hornbooks are the top of most professors acceptable list The good news is that they can provide you with useful background for your reading assignments for class You will then have a context for your reading so you can see how the case you are reading fits into the big picture Specifically hornbooks are treatises in a particular area of law Prosser and Keeton and also Dobbs on Tort Calamari and Perillo on Contracts Stoebuck Whitman and Hovenkamp and Kurtz on Property are all examples of hornbooks These books explain the legal concepts and black letter law in the way a non fiction book or textbook would Hornbooks are more like your undergraduate books except more scholarly and detailed While commercial outlines cover many of the same concepts they don t cover them in great detail A hornbook can go into depth by explaining the reasoning behind a series of cases They can also take you through the legal synthesis process to explain how a group of cases may fit together Do remember however that the hornbook author tells you what the law is unlike the perfect classroom discussion It does not the Socratic method Hornbooks can also help when you create course outlines When you re outlining if you don t understand the concepts from the casebook and class notes read the appropriate section in the hornbook and see if you then understand enough to outline The hornbooks discuss cases so you probably will see an explanation of many of the cases in your casebook The hornbook might just discuss the cases in a way that you understand Downside they are big and long and expensive Don t automatically purchase hornbooks because the cost can be prohibitive Use the library s copies for specific problem areas or to give you some assistance with your outlining But this is a source do not think you are going to read an entire hornbook A more affordable paperback version is the Understanding series published by Lexis Publishing is a good alternative if you find yourself utilizing this type of study aid As with the treatises although more limited this series explains the law of a subject area in a narrative format A mini version of these some say is the Nutshell series West Publishing Company little books that explain the law in a condensed format Their size 5 x 7 may make them seem more palatable and less intimidating Many of them give you just enough law so that you have a clear understanding of course rules concepts and policy The bad side of Nutshells is that this series is generally not favored by professors has few topic headings and sacrifices a lot of significant detail to fit in the small size Therefore because and how keys to exam writing may not be extensively discussed in this series But if you just need the basic stuff look there These books are also good to read if you haven t taken a specific bar course and want to review the general law before you begin taking a bar review course Narrative study guides Similar books although not in size come under such series titles as Examples and Explanations Aspen Law Business the Inside series Wolter Kluwer Aspen the Mastering series Carolina Academic Press and Concepts and Insights Foundation Press These series use primarily narrative explanations of various areas of the law The Inside and Mastering series is new and therefore not as popular as the Examples and Explanation series The Inside series contains a narrative explanation as well as some strategies on how to answer questions in a particular area It also has some good notation regarding the connection of each topic to the entire area of law The Mastering series is great for visual learners because it also has charts to demonstrate some of the material The Examples and Explanations series also contains fact pattern examples of different areas of the law questions about those facts and detailed explanations as answers to the questions This series is rated high with professors and students In fact some of your professors may have suggested you use them as suggested text All of these books are more thorough that the standard outline type of book With respect to Examples and Explanations the series provides detailed analysis more comprehensive than outlines and because it isn t as dense as hornbooks they are easier to follow But the big plus of Examples and Explanations is that they give questions and then explain the answers You can use this book as a good source of hypos b f your exam or as a source for a discussion group with fellow classmates Because most essay exams ask questions based on facts these books can help you determine if you know rules and can apply the rules to this new information in a meaningful way A significant down side is that these explanations and examples may not reflect your professor s take Likewise your professor may use different language when referring to the legal concepts it would be unimpressive that you refer to a key topic with lingo your professor doesn t use Moreover don t ever think that you will do great solely based on how you do in Examples and Explanations or the Inside series Commercial Outlines Almost every student uses a commercial outline at one time Commercial outlines can be very helpful in laying out the black letter law and giving you rules to memorize if that is what you are looking for Some outlines are geared towards certain casebooks so some students find those particularly helpful The problem with commercial outlines is that some students use them in place of reading and working with the material on their own These outlines are intended to supplement your work not replace it What kinds are there Well the two that are best known are Gilberts and Emanuel on about every subject imaginable From an article I read regarding study aids it appeared that Emanuel was considered a better source probably because it has more than simply the black letter law In fact in response to these examples books it appears that many of the outline study aids have added study tips exam hints and some questions Other outline book include Crunchtime Emanuel which has capsule summaries flowcharts exam tips and sample questions Black Letter Thomson West which includes some examples and analysis and Law Outlines Casenotes which contains capsule and complete outlines and limited exam questions Overall commercial outlines can help you get the big picture if you are lost in details Some students just need a boost and this can give it to you While a good syllabus and table of contents of the book may be valuable these outlines can help you separate the details from the main ideas and concepts These outlines are also good to make sure that you did not miss anything big assuming that the professor covers it Rather than spinning your wheels or not having any sense of outlining check one out Remember however even if you know the black letter law from a commercial outline you still need to take the next step and learn how and when to apply it to new factual situations That s how you really learn legal analysis CALIs CALI is short for Computer Assisted Legal Instruction These are interactive computer exercises and questions that test your knowledge of the material and help improve your test taking skills The CALI lessons provide interactive exercises in which you enter responses to questions based on fact patterns and receive an instantaneous evaluation of your answer and prompts to guide you to the right answer You learn the law and how to apply the law to a body of facts the key to doing well on exams Some of the CALIs are mini tutorials on a particular subject Most CALIs tell you how long it should take to complete the exercises and they range anywhere from 10 minutes to one hour You should have received one when you started law school If not check with the library So if you have difficulty understanding a section of the course CALI can help walk you through the basic law Canned Briefs Now we get to the Cliff s Notes of law school casebooks the canned briefs The two big ones are Legalines and Casenotes Legal Briefs Of all the comments I received from the professors there was a universal opinion regarding canned briefs It was DON T USE THEM Seriously you need to read the assigned cases Canned briefs can t be used as a substitute for reading the cases in preparation for class Note only is this book the kind of study aid frowned on by faculty there are essential truths that you need to recognize they aren t very good and critical case reading is an essential legal skill You won t have canned briefs in practice or LRW so you need to learn the process Regarding their use common wisdom says that you can get the first one or two questions answered from the professor but any subsequent hypo or in depth question won t work when the analysis consists of two sentences Miscellaneous Flashcards Tapes etc Flashcards are sometimes helpful for students While it might be better to create your own some sections of the law tend to lend themselves as flashcards Flashcards are also useful if you need to learn a lot of information and need to review for details Students can also practice short hypotheticals to test their knowledge and to get acquainted with the kinds of facts that will raise a particular issue If you like this sort of first step before hitting the longer essay questions do yourself a favor and write out the answers don t just talk them out Remember it is in the explanation of why you decided as you did that you can get lots of points Look to use flashcards when there is certain language or facts which trigger a legal theory this is when flashcards are helpful to chunk all that material together Tapes are great for the oral learner particularly if you drive solo a long way However if you either 1 start and stop the tape at random points again you need to cover a section to make sense or 2 you don t learn well with just the spoken tapes will not prove very valuable A better choice might be a discussion group where a group of students get together to talk it out Again depends on the students Exam Prep Books Students who do well in law school general practice sample questions prior to their exams In this category there are four different series which present various questions and answers in particular courses They are the Exam Pro series Siegel s Q As and Finals Some of them announce the issue and thus are more helpful in understanding the area you are currently studying Others are multi issued questions so issue spotting is part of the process Some are essay questions others have multiple choice questions And while the best way to practice is to use your own professor s exams with model or sample answers students do not always have that advantage No matter what students should practice both during the semester and in preparation for the exams Final Thoughts Too many study aids can be overwhelming If you try to use too many you will be adding to your workload with little likelihood of getting much additional useful information You will also be spending too much money because study aids can be expensive So pick only when you need it and choose wisely Another point to remember is that outlines and such can help with learning black letter law but you also need to learn recognize issues and to apply these rules During exams many questions do not have directives identifying the issues to be discussed So get your outline in reasonable order sufficiently early in the semester so that you can practice answering hypothetical questions preferable the professor s old exams Don t forget to write out the analysis because it is a great way to learn the fundamentals of the law as well as how to properly analyze and apply those rules of law All of these steps are parts of learning to become a lawyer So read cases synthesize outline study and practice but make sure you do it in a timely fashion and don t rely on a last minute magic book And to paraphrase one professor sometimes the best study aid is junk food and candy bars So use what works just remember that there is no substitution for using legal analysis to process the cases and class discussion into legal rules outlines and an exam strategy Suggested Readings Sometimes admitted students are interested in preparing themselves prior to law school Here is a list of some of the books that are available While not exhaustive it at least gives you an idea of what sorts of books can give you information about the process of law school studying Bridging the Gap Between College and Law School Strategies for Success by Ruta K Stropus Charlotte D Taylor ISBN 089089 945 2 Carolina Academic Press 2001 this is probably my first choice the book methodically explains the process so that you know what to expect in law school Law 101 2d edition by Jay M Feinman ISBN 0 19 517957 9 Oxford University Press 2006 Law Law Study and the Lawyer s Role by James Moliterno and Fredric Lederer ISBN 0 89089 453 3 Carolina Academic Press 1991 Law in a Nutshell Law School Success 2d edition by Ann M Burkhart and Robert A Stein ISBN 9780314167798 West Publishing Company 2008 Law School without Fear Strategies for Success 2d edition by Helene S Shapo and Marshall Shapo ISBN 1 58778 187 5 Foundation Press 2002 Legal Analysis The Fundamental Skill 2d edition by David Romantz and Kathleen Elliott Vinson ISBN 978 1 59480 279 5 Carolina Academic Press 2009 Reading Like a Lawyer by Ruth Ann McKinney ISBN 1 59460 03205 Carolina Academic Press 2005 Starting Off Right in Law School by Carolyn J Nygren ISBN 0 89089 877 4 Carolina Academic Press 1997 14 00 Strategies and Tactics for the First Year Law Student by Kimm Alayne Walton and Lazar Emanuel ISBN 9780735539983 Emanual Aspen Publishing Companies 2004 Understanding Law School by Various Authors ISBN 0 8205 6193 2 Mathew Bender 2004 What Every Law Student Really Needs to Know by Tracey E George and Suzanna Sherry ISBN 13 978 0 7355 8236 1 Aspen Publishers 2009 Whose Monet An Introduction to the American Legal System by John Humbach ISBN 0 7355 6557 0 Aspen Publishers 2007 1L of a Ride by Andrew J McClurg ISBN 978 0 19483 1 Thomson West 2009 1000 Days to the Bar But the Practice of Law Begins Now by Dennis J Tonsing ISBN 0 8377 3726 5 William S Hein Co Inc 2003 Finally I would suggest you pick up Getting to Maybe How to Excel on Law School Exams by Richard Michael Fischl and Jeremy Paul to help you while you are in your first semester Once you begin law school you will find that this book demonstrates the process of legal analysis in a clear way Time Management When you think about law school you should be thinking about problem solving and learning the legal analytic way to solve those problems However one of the first problems you might face is having enough time to learn legal analysis to complete your readings to write your assignments So wouldn t it be great if we had unlimited amounts of time General wisdom within the law school ranks states that there is a four to one ratio of study and preparation time for every hour in a classroom in law school While an undergraduate you probably spent two hours for every hour in class Now it s different law school study and preparation should add up to sixty hours a week to your already hectic life Do I mention this to make you work harder Well while you will become more efficient as you continue through the year you do need to be prepared to spend considerable amounts of time in order to succeed in school However my main purpose is to encourage you to think about time management which after all really means hands on control of your law school career So don t panic even if you do spend 15 hours in class and 45 hours studying law and even if you sleep 56 hours a week you still have 52 hours a week for life which I might add is 30 more than the average work week However whether you do find sufficient time to do everything you need to do is dependent on three things Knowing when you work study best Planning ahead Using your time well and committing to get the work finished This means schedules In general schedules provided you with the specific knowledge that you are either ahead of schedule and in great shape or on schedule and in good shape or behind schedule and in trouble In much the same way as the person facing large credit card debts generally gets there by small purchases a dollar here twenty there a person who finds himself behind in studying and preparation generally gets there by wasting ten minutes here an hour there and an afternoon there The best way to avoid that pattern is to make a schedule So note that most days you have at least an hour between classes take a hard look at that time and ask yourself what you do with it As a suggestion most of your briefing reading should be finished b f school begins So why not take the time after contracts to first go back over that class notes and review synthesize and or go over the briefs for the next class Doing either or both puts you ahead of the game you will be able to either shorten the outlining synthesizing into rule time or you will feel like you know what you are talking about in your next class and therefore take better notes which leads you to better synthesizing etc Do you do relatively easy review of briefs between classes or initial prep for the next day or do you really get down to hard thinking during these breaks It depends on your body clock Ask yourself when you work the best Decide what kind of person you are Early person Use those daytime hours to the full extent you can On the other hand if you can t study past 9 p m on most days don t schedule yourself to 11 p m each night for outlining and synthesizing because it won t be worth it Study time refers to productive preparation reading and review not simply staring at a book So for the early birds maybe you want to get up early and study and hit the gym later in the evening when your brain is tired The same applies for those who can barely make an 8 00 a m class don t count on reading those cases in any meaningful way before that first class You might like to get relatively simple tasks out of the way in the morning do review do preliminary LRW task go to the gym etc This reflection on your body clock may require you to alter the above schedule to save your prime times for study So you might be the person who really starts thinking well after dinner Go with that time but make sure you remember that you still have early classes Be leery of marathon study sessions You may think reading reviewing and studying from 10 a m to 10 p m on Saturday is a great way to go allowing you to make up for totally blowing off Friday Wait Think about it If you are finished with classes by noon or 1 p m on Friday you can still do initial reading and some early drafting for your legal research and writing which requires a decent block of time and still have time to go to dinner and a movie Or you can do the LRW followed by reviewing your notes in Contracts and Property and still have time for the 8 00 p m show And let s be realistic depending on what you did the night before you may not be prepared to study at 10 a m The upshot is that you need to study productively in reasonable blocks of time And that means you need to know how to say no If someone wants to play 18 holes of golf and you aren t ready for that study group say no If you eat lunch as a group and others want to linger until the 3 00 p m class and you need to review for class say no Saying no is not always fun but in order to minimize stress you need to limit your activities during these critical first semesters Second you need to plan ahead Ideally you should review the academic calendar and record all the usual holidays school breaks changes of class days etc Note when you may be traveling home or celebrating a family birthday Be realistic you won t study for eight hours on your birthday if traditionally your friends or family take you out to dinner Then take out your exam schedule and mark all the exam dates Likewise look at your syllabi for all classes and check when legal writing papers are due including drafts Working from those dates determine a schedule for writing the first second third draft as well as factoring in meetings with teaching assistants and your professors Realistically on weeks when you have research or writing assignments due you will need to study and otherwise prepare for your courses differently So get ahead during the weeks you do not have significant writing responsibilities Likewise note when midterms or practice exams if any are scheduled You will need to make sure those course outlines are sufficiently prepared to use in your studying Therefore you will need to perhaps start those outlines sooner or at least work harder on them in the weeks prior to the midterm practice exam This semester schedule is not filled with minutia Rather it is only your reference for completing a weekly schedule The semester schedule will simply allow you to see the big picture and make sure you start projects at a reasonable point Again the goal is to provide balance so that you recognize that one week will be considered a heavy legal writing week while another may be the week to concentrate on contracts or torts Overall however you will cover all courses Now turn you attention to this upcoming week Block out your classes set appointments meals sleep etc so that you can clearly see the remaining free time The weekly schedule is the best method for flagging important upcoming events draft due on Friday at noon study group discussion on adverse possession on Wednesday at 4 p m Try to keep some flexibility for unexpected events yet structured sufficiently so that you get your studying finished Before you go to sleep each night ask yourself the two or three things you must accomplish the next day Write them down in order of importance followed by a few more things you need to do that day Look at your calendar note when you can accomplish the most important tasks and be liberal in estimating the time Only after the critical tasks are completed should you find time for the less important tasks Try to use your most productive times for the tasks that need the most concentration The next day do them as stated completing them before moving to the less critical items Be realistic if you must buy a birthday present for your spouse boyfriend girlfriend do it quickly during the time you are least productive Thinking you need to do something but refusing to find time for it is a sure trip to stress and an impediment to studying and preparing for class Likewise block sufficient time so that you can complete the essentials if that writing draft is due the next day give yourself the time to do one last concentrated edit for we all know that you never wait until the last day to write a paper You may also need sufficient time to outline the section on subject matter jurisdiction so don t try to accomplish that between contracts and property Use short periods of time for reviewing your class notes or case briefs setting up appointments with the professors or TA s or otherwise dealing with specific legal questions Finally time management means that your study time is actually productive So have a goal when you study Don t tell yourself that you

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  • Appointments | SLU LAW
    s Deli Bella s Frozen Yogurt Cafe Smoothie King Home Academics Academic Resource Center Writing Support Appointments Appointments In addition to getting feedback from professors and teaching assistants on current writing assignments all current SLU LAW students are encouraged to make use of Writing Support Services Appointments fill up fast especially around due dates so students are strongly encouraged to make appointments early For further guidelines about appointments please check below for details 1L Appointment Guidelines Fall Semester All current 1L students are welcome to drop by the Academic Resource Center in 1082 and sign up for an individual feedback appointment on all LRW assignments except for the last assignment of the semester Only students who receive their professor s referral for the last assignment can make appointments However students without a referral for the last assignment are welcome to come by for special brief drop in session for quick feedback or questions Please come by Professor Morse s office for appointment sign ups Spring Semester Unlike fall semester only students who receive their professor s referral students will receive a letter will be able to make a priority appointment However those students who do not receive a referral letter will still have the option to attend the drop in sessions for quick points of clarification etc Paper Submission Guidelines Please submit a hard copy no more than 3 pages double spaced of writing by the indicated deadline time Please identify and submit 2 specific questions on assignment which you need addressed A typical appointment will be approximately 20 minutes Please do put your name on the paper your professor s name and your appointment time day If paper is late unfortunately your appointment will be given to another student If for any reason you can t make the appointment

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  • Writing Opportunities | SLU LAW
    of the democratic way of life or promotion and encouragement of better group relations Any graduating law student may submit a paper written for a law school seminar or journal The winner is selected by a faculty committee Students are to submit three copies of the paper to Kim Morse in the Office of Student Services The papers should have no names on them but should be submitted in an envelope with the student s name and contact information Moot Court Programs and Competitions Moot Court Competitions At Saint Louis University School of Law we provide our students with on going opportunities to hone the skills necessary for success beyond the classroom For this reason activities like competitions are essential in preparing students for experiences found in the real world setting Moot Court competitions are a regular opportunity for SLU LAW students in a variety of legal areas Appellate Advocacy Moot Court Competition Under the direction of Professor Paige Canfield the Appellate Advocacy program seeks to sharpen a student s skills in research analysis writing and oral argument Appellate Advocacy at SLU LAW begins with Moot Court I and II courses In Moot Court I students are assigned a team and with the assistance of Moot Court student judges must research and prepare an appellate brief as well as present oral arguments The student judges a group of third year students previously a part of the program work in tandem with the Director of Legal Research and Writing Chris Rollins to review the student teams as they engage in competition The top 20 students from Moot Court I are invited to participate in Moot Court II Participants in Moot Court II engage in quarter final semi final and final rounds of arguments The final arguments are held before a large audience at the School of Law and are judged by visiting justices and judges from the U S Supreme Court the U S Court of Appeals the Missouri Supreme Court the Missouri Court of Appeals and other federal and state courts Finalists in Moot Court II are eligible to compete in the National Moot Court competition Jessup Moot Court Competition In this competition students are required to write a brief and argue a hypothetical case pertaining to international law as if arguing in front of the International Court of Justice in the Hague Netherlands Selected through an internal competition the School s team consists of second and third year students The winning team from the Midwest Regional Competition then proceeds to the international round pitting them against the winners from the other eleven U S regional competitions and national competitions in over 50 different countries Intellectual Property Moot Court Competition Law students participate in two intellectual property moot court competitions The Giles Sutherland Rich Moot Court Competition sponsored by the American Intellectual Property Law Association and the Saul Lefkowitz Moot Court Competition sponsored by the Brand Names Education Foundation In both competitions students are required to write a brief and

    Original URL path: http://law.slu.edu/academics/academic-resource-center/writing-support/writing-opportunities (2016-02-12)
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  • Writing Tips and Resources | SLU LAW
    for International and Comparative Law William C Wefel Center for Employment Law DEPARTMENTS Admissions Apply Now Schedule A Visit Overview and Stats Contact Us Alumni Alumni Events Saint Louis Brief Magazine Support the School Update My Informaton Contact Us Career Services For Students For Employers For Alumni Symplicity Contact Us Communications Make an Announcement Design Request Web Update Request Style Guide Logo Downloads Press Releases Information Technology Services Legal Clinics Student Services Financial Services Student Organizations Disability Services Multicultural Affairs and Outreach Contact Us Vincent C Immel Law Library FACULTY STAFF Faculty Adjunct Faculty Emeritus Faculty Full time Faculty Library Faculty Staff Faculty and Staff Resources STUDENTS Current Students Prospective Students Student Organizations Student Life SLU Zone Planet Sub Papa John s Mississippi Mud Coffee Medina Flamingo Bowl Drunken Fish Caruso s Deli Bella s Frozen Yogurt Cafe Smoothie King Home Academics Academic Resource Center Writing Support Writing Tips and Resources Writing Tips and Resources Seminar Writing Guidelines Organization Sample Seminar Paper Legal Writing Westlaw Tips and Articles About Legal Writing Legal Writing Exercises Bryan A Garner Guidelines and Practice Exercises Prof Grinke Resume Cover Letters Career Services SLU Plagiarism Policy SLU Plagiarism Policy SLU Writing Course Offerings Legal Research

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  • Academic Curriculum | SLU LAW
    Visit Overview and Stats Contact Us Alumni Alumni Events Saint Louis Brief Magazine Support the School Update My Informaton Contact Us Career Services For Students For Employers For Alumni Symplicity Contact Us Communications Make an Announcement Design Request Web Update Request Style Guide Logo Downloads Press Releases Information Technology Services Legal Clinics Student Services Financial Services Student Organizations Disability Services Multicultural Affairs and Outreach Contact Us Vincent C Immel Law

    Original URL path: http://law.slu.edu/tag/academic-curriculum (2016-02-12)
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  • Course Planning | SLU LAW
    develop the technical skills expected of a practicing lawyer The upper division seminar requirement provides an opportunity to engage in scholarly writing However students are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the many courses and project opportunities that will further develop their research and writing skills The Importance of Course Planning Customized academic planning is key to developing a greater breadth and depth in the field of law The diversity of the SLU LAW curriculum allows students to both acquire a broad knowledge base in the law and to specialize in a distinct area Students are encouraged to take advantage of the multiple sources of advice and guidance in planning their legal education ranging from individual meetings to group advising sessions Sequencing of Courses First year required courses are often viewed as building blocks from the Common Law tradition Viewed in this light the required Contracts course must be taken before Commercial Transactions which must be taken prior to Advanced Commercial Transactions Similarly Property is a required course and is followed by Trusts and Estates then Estate Planning Some other examples of building blocks include Civil Procedure and Evidence which are prerequisites to Clinics and Trial Advocacy Additionally a number of courses should be seen as a foundation for more specialized courses Students are encouraged to enroll in these courses in their second year through the registration priority system Second year registration priority courses are Administrative Law Business Associations Commercial Transactions Criminal Procedure Evidence Trusts and Estates In addition students interested in specializing may elect from the following Labor Law International Law Health Law IP Survey Tax or Moot Court I Finally certain courses such as Admiralty Remedies Conflict of Laws and Federal Courts offer a cross cutting approach to much of the law dealt with in other courses Students

    Original URL path: http://law.slu.edu/academics/curriculum/course-planning (2016-02-12)
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  • Registration Priority System | SLU LAW
    Deli Bella s Frozen Yogurt Cafe Smoothie King Home Academics Registrar Registration Information Registration Priority System Registration Priority System The registration priority system is designed to provide predictability and minimizes conflict between course offerings Prior to each semester a complete list of classes and their priority assignments are published under Course Information Courses fall into priority registration categories as follows Seat Assigned A number of course offerings are not open to online registration in Banner Self Service These include clinics competition classes journals as well as other courses designated in the registration materials each semester Seats in these courses are assigned by a faculty member and registration is done by the Registrar s Office Second Year Priority Classes designated as second year priority classes are open first to those students who will be second year students during the semester in which the class is offered Remaining seats if any are available to other students on a first come first serve basis during the open registration period Third Year Priority Classes designated as third year priority classes are open first to students who will be in their last one or two semesters of law school in the semester in which the class is offered Remaining seats if any are available to other students on a first come first serve basis during the open registration period Evening Priority Courses offered beginning at 6 00 p m or after are open first to students in the part time program Seats are reserved pro rata for part time students in courses which begin between 4 00 p m 6 00 p m Students in the part time program are welcome to register for any daytime class with remaining seats during the open registration period Seminars All students are required to take at least one

    Original URL path: http://law.slu.edu/academics/registrar/registration-information/registration-priority-system (2016-02-12)
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  • Required Courses | SLU LAW
    and Writing I 3 Torts 4 Second Semester Civil Procedure II 3 credit hours Constitutional Law I 3 Contracts II 2 Legal Research and Writing II 3 Property 4 Upper Division Required Courses Humanities Course or Seminar 2 3 credit hours Legal Profession Professional Ethics 3 Professional Skills Course 1 3 Seminar 2 After completing the first year requirements students can select from a variety of offerings to complete the minimum of 91 hours to graduate The majority of upper division courses are elective with the exception of the requirements listed below Humanities Requirement The Humanities requirement may be satisfied by enrolling in any course or seminar designated as such A humanities course or seminar is one in which the material is studied from the perspective of another discipline or from the perspective of non U S law Examples of humanities offerings include but are not limited to American Legal History course and seminar Bioethics and the Law Comparative Law courses and seminars Critical Race Theory Jurisprudence Law Philosophy seminar Law Psychiatry seminar Seminar Requirement Seminars involve a small group of students who engage in extensive research writing and discussion Seminars of varying topics are offered every semester Examples of recent seminars include but are not limited to Access to Health Care American Presidency Copyright New Media Corporate Social Responsibility Death Penalty Legal History Regulation of Human Research The Immigration Debate White Collar Crime Legal Profession Legal Profession is a required 3 credit hour course that examines the duties of lawyers to the profession their clients and the larger community Professional Skills Requirement Courses meeting this requirement are designed to provide students with the experience of applying legal theory and skills to simulated or real client matters Students may satisfy this requirement by representing clients under faculty supervision in the legal clinics or externship placements Client representation courses include Civil Advocacy Clinic Criminal Advocacy Clinic Mediation Clinic Externship Placement Many professional skills classes are also available that provide students with the opportunity to practice legal skills in a variety of simulated client situations These include but are not limited to Anatomy of a Patent Advanced Real Estate Transactions Civil Practice Client Counseling Environmental Due Diligence Fraud Abuse in Health Care Law Practice Management Moot Court Negotiations Transactional Health Care Practice Trial Advocacy I II Part Time Day Course Requirements There are two options for the Part Time Day Program an 11 hour schedule listed below or an 8 hour schedule which postpones the asterisked courses below until semesters three and four respectively First Semester Civil Procedure I 2 Contracts I 3 Legal Research and Writing I 3 Criminal Law 3 Second Semester Civil Procedure II 3 Contracts II 2 Legal Research and Writing II 3 Constitutional Law I 3 Third Semester Torts 4 Electives up to 7 hours Fourth Semester Property 4 Legal Profession 3 Electives up to 4 hours Upper Division Required Courses Humanities Course or Seminar 2 3 Legal Profession Professional Ethics 3 Professional Skills Course 1 3

    Original URL path: http://law.slu.edu/academics/curriculum/required-courses (2016-02-12)
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