archive-edu.com » EDU » S » STANFORD.EDU

Total: 470

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Department of Anthropology
    Heritage Human Behavioral Ecology Human Ecology of Infectious Diseases Linguistic Anthropology Materiality Medical Anthropology Population and Environment Sovereignty the Modern State and Biopolitics Subsistence and Livelihood Transnational and Global Political Economy World Archaeology RESEARCH PROJECTS BY REGION Click on the map to search by region GRADUATE PROGRAM TRACKS ARCHAEOLOGY CULTURE AND SOCIETY ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENT UNDERGRAD PROGRAM EMPHASIS CULTURE AND SOCIETY ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENT MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY SELF DESIGNED EMPHASIS IN

    Original URL path: http://stanford.edu/dept/anthropology/cgi-bin/web/ (2012-11-21)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Expanded Advising Programs (EAP) | Undergraduate Academic Life
    students to create an optimal learning environment by facilitating a community support network among diverse groups of students On average participants commit 1 to 2 hours per week to activities Back to Top EAP Program Mission The Mission of Expanded Advising Programs EAP of the Office of Undergraduate Advising and Research is to augment the traditional first year advising program through community focused advising groups and increased access to Stanford community resources to promote the development of skills related to intellectual inquiry reflection and discourse With this Mission in mind the goals of the Expanded Advising Programs are To help students fully examine the nature of study the purpose of the university and their role therein To provide students with mentor led study groups which support and supplement in class assignments and facilitate academic excellence To offer students quarterly co curricular programming workshops tours dinners which facilitate intellectual stimulation outside the classroom To introduce students to faculty and alumni as well as to graduate and undergraduate EAP mentors and to provide social engagements for the exchange of information and ideas with those individuals Back to Top Partners for Academic Excellence PAE Participants in these programs are organized into small groups e g five to ten first year students who meet regularly e g every week or every two weeks with assigned graduate and undergraduate student mentors Mentors serve as guides providing academic and career advice support direction and encouragement from a student perspective Within their respective groups students explore and discuss topics such as available campus resources and student opportunities Issues such as the transition to university life and accessing university resources and academic opportunities are addressed in these sessions as well as in workshops with guests from campus departments and programs Students also have opportunities to take part in educational excursions both on and off campus PAE I Ernest Houston Johnson Scholars Program Co sponsored by Black Community Services Center BCSC To introduce students to Black African American faculty and alumni to facilitate small group mentoring and to examine the academic and research opportunities at Stanford PAE II Co sponsored by Stanford Athletics To assist world class student athletes in managing their demanding schedules and utilizing their limited free time efficiently to ensure academic excellence PAE IV Co sponsored by El Centro Chicano To introduce students to Chicano Latino faculty and alumni to facilitate small group mentoring to expose students to academic and research opportunities at Stanford and to familiarize participants with the intellectual heritage history and culture of our community PAE V Co sponsored by Native American Cultural Center To introduce students to the diverse Native student communities to facilitate small group mentoring and to introduce students to academic exploration and research opportunities Back to Top LGBT Community Academic Support Advising LGBT CASA LGBT CASA focuses on creating a community of academic and social support for LGBT students and their straight allies This program is designed to assist incoming students in building a comprehensive community support system to

    Original URL path: http://stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_ual/APSU_eap.html (2012-11-21)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Stanford Introductory Studies (SIS) | Undergraduate Academic Life
    These courses include requirements in the Introduction to the Humanities IHUM and Writing and Rhetoric PWR or Structured Liberal Education SLE which incorporates both requirements as well as Introductory Seminars Introductory Seminars Introductory Seminars are small group courses taught by faculty to freshmen and sophomores across a wide range of disciplines providing opportunities for students to explore their interests and develop long term mentoring relationships Back to Top Thinking Matters TM TM offers specially designed courses dedicated to major ideas and themes in human identity and existence combining a lecture format co taught by faculty and small class discussions led by premier post doctoral fellows Back to Top Program in Writing and Rhetoric PWR PWR courses engage students in rhetorical and contextual analysis of texts and substantive research based argument developing the intellectual and stylistic elements of their writing and their ability to analyze the ideas and persuasive strategies of others and to apply those insights to their own writing Back to Top Structured Liberal Education SLE SLE is an intensive residentially based program that simultaneously satisfies the Introduction to the Humanities requirement the Writing and Rhetoric I and II requirements and one General Education Breadth requirement in the humanities

    Original URL path: http://stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_ual/AP_univ_req_sis.html (2012-11-21)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Sophomore College Information for 2012 Student Participants | Undergraduate Academic Life
    a community of scholars Important Note You will be billed for Early Arrival Housing and we will cover those costs Please check your bill at the end of August to ensure you are reimbursed for these expenses Email sophcollege stanford edu if you have any questions Dates You Want to Plan For View September Studies 2012 Calendar Getting Started Moving in moving out A day in the life So you re going off campus Who You Will Get to Know 2012 Faculty and Courses Student Commitment Students are expected to be fully committed to Sophomore College This means attending all class sessions class field trips and mandatory college wide activities Sophomore College participants cannot work a full or part time job or travel outside of required class activities during the program Summer jobs must be completed before September Studies begins September Studies participants cannot work at Stanford Sierra Camp for example which overlaps Because of conflicts with required training schedules RA and RCC roles preclude participation in Sophomore College as do some other dorm staff positions Any dorm staff positions should be disclosed as possible conflicts on your commitment form All absences from Sophomore College including weekends must be approved by the faculty instructor Students cannot be absent for more than two days between September 5 and September 23 and may not arrive late to the program if it will cause them to miss a class meeting As during the regular academic year student conduct is guided by the Fundamental Standard and Honor Code Admission to the program may be revoked at any point if a student is found to be ineligible or in violation of the Fundamental Standard or Honor Code IMPORTANT NOTE Students who commit to attend and then withdraw will be charged a 600 withdrawal assessment fee

    Original URL path: http://stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_ual/OO_soph_college_SoCoStudentParticipants.html (2012-11-21)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Sophomore College Resources | Undergraduate Academic Life
    Service Research Opportunities Grants Scholarships Fellowships September Studies at Stanford Arts Intensive Bing Honors College Leland Scholars Program Sophomore College Rights and Responsibilities Deadlines Events Printables For Faculty Staff For Parents Family Ask Us Give Feedback Program Overview Student Participants Resources and Media Sophomore College Resources On This Page Resources in September Studies Click here for September Studies Resources Back to Top Advising Appointments Deadlines Events Questions about SoCo Email

    Original URL path: http://stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_ual/OO_soph_college_SoCoResources.html (2012-11-21)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Sophomore College 2012 Frequently Asked Questions | Undergraduate Academic Life
    for their own travel arrangements to designated off campus locations on specified dates The program will arrange and pay for their return to Stanford University at the end of the field seminar Arrival dates and locations may vary as noted in the off campus seminars website Back to Top Is financial aid available Financial aid is available to help defray the remaining program fee students should indicate interest in aid on the application form These grants cannot be applied toward other personal expenses or travel as described above The Financial Aid Office will determine eligibility Financial need will have no bearing on course applications We anticipate adding the financial aid status for the remaining program fee to the student application status by the beginning of May Even if the financial aid hasn t been posted the student should submit the online confirmation form by the deadline If the student does not receive aid and decides not to participate the student can withdraw without penalty by May 18 For students on financial aid the Financial Aid Office has also agreed to replace the portion of expected earnings lost due to participation in Sophomore College with either grants or loans depending on the family financial situation If you are accepted to a class contact the Financial Aid Office at financialaid stanford edu They will work with you to determine how loans or grants may be used to offset your lost earnings Financial Aid Office financialaid stanford edu Back to Top Will applying for financial aid hurt my chances of getting in No applying for or receiving financial aid will not affect your opportunity to participate in Sophomore College Faculty reviewing applicants for their courses never see if a student has applied for financial aid Decisions about aid are based upon recommendations from the Financial Aid Office and are entirely separate from the selection process Back to Top Will I get academic credit for participating Yes Students who attend Sophomore College will receive two units of credit for academic work in the course Students will enroll in their Sophomore College course for the Summer Quarter Back to Top What are the eligibility requirements Eligible students will fulfill the following parameters Have been enrolled for no more than three academic quarters Be sophomores in Autumn Quarter 2012 Be in good academic standing Have completed at least 36 units of academic work by the end of Spring Quarter 2012 Have an on campus housing assignment for 2012 2013 and plan to be enrolled in the Autumn Quarter No exceptions Admitted students who are found to have academic standing problems after completing Spring Quarter may have their admission revoked Back to Top I don t have a high GPA or formal background in the subject Is there any point in applying Faculty instructors do not see transcripts They are looking for students from diverse backgrounds to bring a variety of perspectives to the discussion They would rather not have a whole class of students who already

    Original URL path: http://stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_ual/OO_soph_college_SocoFAQ.html (2012-11-21)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Sophomore College Courses and Faculty | Undergraduate Academic Life
    are strongly influenced by the energy markets technologies and policies that we will also study Our quest for a sustainable energy future will begin at Stanford s Bass Center in Washington D C and conclude back on the Farm This will allow access to policy makers and major organizations along with plans for major improvements to Stanford s energy system and buildings The course requires query responses on the readings in advance of class sessions participation in morning class discussions and afternoon activities with key energy players in teams of two analysis of a self selected topic related to an energy market or technology and a group course project to analyze an energy policy or proposal It is offered for two units with Satisfactory No Credit grading Students cover their own travel to the Bass center and arrive by 5 p m on September 6 The program will cover your travel to campus on September 16 Students planning to observe religious holidays during September Studies should check with the instructor to work through potential conflicts Professor Bob Tatum joined Stanford in 1983 and is Obayashi Professor of Engineering Emeritus His background includes work on military infrastructure and power plant projects and teaching and research related to building systems and industrial construction He enjoys mountain biking in the Bay Area backpacking on the Appalachian Trail and analyzing technological advancements for motor sports and sailing Professor Tatum s Bio Page Back to Top Environmental and Geological Field Studies in the Rocky Mountains Environmental Earth System Science Prerequisites None The ecologically and geologically diverse Rocky Mountain area is being strongly impacted by changing land use patterns global and regional environmental change and societal demands for energy and natural resources This field program emphasizes coupled environmental and geological problems in the Rocky Mountains covering a broad range of topics including the geologic origin of the American West from three billion years ago to the present paleoclimatology and the glacial history of this mountainous region the long and short term carbon cycle and global climate change and environmental issues in the American West related to changing land use patterns and increased demand for its abundant natural resources These broad topics are integrated into a coherent field study as we examine earth environmental science related questions in three different settings 1 the three billion year old rocks and the modern glaciers of the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming 2 the sediments in the adjacent Wind River basin that host abundant gas and oil reserves and also contain the long term climate history of this region and 3 the volcanic center of Yellowstone National Park and the mountainous region of Teton National Park and the economic and environmental problems associated with gold mining and extraction of oil and gas in areas adjoining these national parks Students will complete six assignments based upon field exercises working in small groups to analyze data and prepare reports and maps Lectures will be held in the field prior to and after fieldwork Note This course involves one week of backpacking in the Wind Rivers and hiking while staying in cabins near Jackson Hole Wyoming Students must arrive in Salt Lake City on Monday September 3 Hotel lodging will be provided for the night of September 3 and thereafter students will travel as a Sophomore College group We will return to campus on Friday September 21 Professor Page Chamberlain received his Ph D in Geology and Geophysics from Harvard in 1985 He is a professor in the Department of Environmental Earth System Science His research is in isotope biogeochemistry He has worked in the Rocky Mountains Tibet and the Himalayas and the S Alps of New Zealand Professor Chamberlain s Bio Page Back to Top Face of Battle Department of Political Science Freeman Spogli Institute CISAC Prerequisites None Our understanding of warfare often derives from the lofty perspective of political leaders and generals what were their objectives and what strategies were developed to meet them This top down perspective slights the experience of the actual combatants and non combatants caught in the crossfire This course focuses on the complexity of the process by which strategy is translated into tactical decisions by the officers and foot soldiers on the field of battle We will focus on three battles in American history Gettysburg July 1863 the Battle of Little Bighorn June 1876 and the Korengal Valley campaign in Afghanistan 2006 2010 In addition to reading major works on these battles and the conflicts in which they occurred we will travel to Gettysburg Pennsylvania and the Little Bighorn battlefield in Montana The course s battlefield tours are based on the staff rides developed by the Prussian Army in the mid 1800s and employed by the U S Army since the early 1900s While at Stanford students will conduct extensive research on individual participants at Gettysburg and Little Bighorn Then as we walk through the battlefield sites students will brief the group on their subjects experience of battle and on why they made the decisions they did during the conflict Why did Lt General Longstreet oppose the Confederate attack on the Union Army at Gettysburg What was the experience of a military surgeon on a Civil War battlefield Why did Custer divide his 7th Cavalry troops as they approached the Little Bighorn River What was the role of Lakota Sioux women after a battle Travel will be provided and paid by Sophomore College except incidentals and is made possible by the support of the Center for International Security and Cooperation CISAC The course is open to students from a range of disciplines an interest in the topic is the only prerequisite Professor Scott Sagan is the Caroline S G Munro Professor of Political Science and Senior Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation He is a specialist on nuclear weapons and international security and the recipient of four major teaching awards His distant relative Major General George E Pickett led the final Confederate charge at Gettysburg Professor Sagan s Bio Page Joseph Felter is a senior research scholar at Stanford s Center for International Security and Cooperation CISAC He is a specialist on counterinsurgency and counterterrorism Before coming to Stanford he served as a career U S Army Special Forces officer with operational combat deployments to Panama Iraq and Afghanistan Joseph Felter s Bio Page Back to Top Ghost Stories Why the Dead Return and What They Want from Us Comparative Literature Prerequisites None Ghost stories haunt our imagination When the dead return they may scare us or warn us they may pursue us with violence or burden us with sorrow They shock us with the boo of surprise just as they frustrate us by their elusiveness Blood chilling stories terrify us but they also provide entertainment The ghost story is one of the most enduring genres from classical literature to popular film Yet behind the door of the story lurk both anxiety and wisdom anxiety about our own mortality and wisdom about the cultural place of the past between memory and regret mourning and forgetting The undead point to what we have not accomplished just as they direct us since the ghost of Hamlet s father toward deeds In this seminar we will explore some of these ghostly ambitions During the summer in preparation for the seminar students will read selected stories and novels and post comments to the course website When we convene in September we will discuss the summer findings and proceed to examine a selection of novels that explore ghosts and hauntings Texts will include Shirley Jackson s The Haunting of Hill House Peter Straub s Ghost Story and others We will also spend some dark and stormy nights with ghost films and even follow the trail to some hauntings at Stanford and in the Bay Area Students are expected to participate regularly in the CourseWork discussion forum and work in small groups with other course members to discuss and present readings Professor Russell Berman studies the interconnections among literature culture and politics especially from Germany but internationally too Our modern world that prides itself on progress can be a frightening place often haunted by the past this makes ghost stories more than just entertainment they tell us about our present Professor Berman s Bio Page Back to Top Good Food Fast Cars Great Spaces Creative Connections between Architecture Cooking Photography and Design Architectural Design Program Prerequisites Some drawing experience would be ideal but not required Why is it that architects almost routinely share passions for cuisine vehicles photography and sailing Many chefs were trained as architects most architects are excellent cooks and photographers and a stunning number of architects own boats This course will explore the key design ideas notions of creativity and interest in form that thread through each of these professions The first half of the course will focus on readings and discussion about creativity and form the second half will test a single conceptual idea through a series of projects in two or three fields Possible field trips may include a visit to Tesla America s Cup events in SF Baume 2 Michelin Star restaurant in Palo Alto IDEO and architecture firms Professor John Barton is Director of Stanford s Architectural Design Program He is an award winning local architect who earned bachelor s and master s degrees in architecture from UC Berkeley He combines teaching and an active professional practice with significant community service He loves cooking design cool cars and travel Professor Barton s Bio Page Back to Top Hip Hop as a Universal Language School of Education Prerequisites None This seminar cipher considers the prospect of Hip Hop as a Universal Language Hip Hop Culture has captured the minds of youth all around the world from Japan to Amsterdam like the homie Kurupt says shaping youth identities styles attitudes languages fashions and both physical and political stances The field of global Hip Hop studies has emerged as scholars around the world grapple with what is arguably the most profound cultural musical and linguistic youth movement of the early 21st century Participants in this seminar cipher will be engaged in critical discussions around a particular constellation of concerns Hip Hop Cultures youth identities the politics of language race and ethnicity and the simultaneous processes of globalization and localization Through the examination of various texts scholarly readings documentary films guest speakers and artists we span the Global Hip Hop Nation through scenes as diverse as Hong Kong s urban center Germany s Mannheim inner city district of Weststadt the Brazilian favelas the streets of Lagos and Dar es Salaam and the hoods of the San Francisco Bay Area to explore Hip Hop s global linguistic flows Professor H Samy Alim is Director of the Institute for Diversity in the Arts He writes about Hip Hop Culture extensively in Roc the Mic Right Routledge 2006 and Global Linguistic Flows Routledge 2009 Alim has lectured on Global Hip Hop Cultures throughout Europe the Middle East and the US Professor Alim s Bio Page Back to Top Language Identity The Power of Public Discourse School of Education Prerequisites None Have you ever engaged in a conversation with someone who sounds different than you expect This course explores instances like those that highlight the interaction between language and identity and its implications for learning The theme of language and identity emerges as significant because of the subtle yet powerful impact it has on our cultural interactions We have an inherent expectation of how we expect people to communicate Yet do these expectations interfere with teaching and learning practices Many individuals take seminars and classes that focus on teaching professional modes of communication and discourse This course will offer a detailed examination of scholarship that investigates the power of the subtle messages embedded in language In addition to gain a sense of the power of these interactions in practice we will engage in the following research activities a Participants will engage in school site visits to examine these interactions in practice b Participants will engage in critical interviews of broadcasters at a local television station to discuss the role of language and identity in their presentation and c We will visit a recording studio to discuss the role of language and identity with local hip hop producers and artists Professor Bryan Brown is an Associate Professor of education His research focuses on the relationship between students language practices and identities and classroom learning Dr Brown s research examines how language is a critical mediator of learning that must be understood in an effort to improve classroom teaching and learning Professor Brown s Bio Page Back to Top Learning Theater From Audience to Critic at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival Drama Continuing Studies and Summer Session Prerequisites None Who doesn t love going to a play sitting in the darkened theater an anonymous member of the audience waiting to be entertained charmed and challenged But how many of us know enough about the details of the plays their interpretation their production and acting itself to allow us to appreciate fully the theatrical experience In this seminar we will spend 13 days in Ashland Oregon at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival OSF where we will attend these plays Shakespeare s Romeo and Juliet As You Like It Henry V and Troilus and Cressida George Kaufman and Morrie Ryskind s Animal Crackers the world premiere of Robert Schenkkan s All the Way Bill Rauch and Tracy Young s new adaptation Medea Macbeth Cinderella the world premiere of Party People by UNIVERSES and a new Shakespearean adaptation by Alison Carey The Very Merry Wives of Windsor Iowa To read more about these productions go to http www osfashland org We will also spend time backstage meeting with actors designers and artistic and administrative directors of OSF Students will read the plays before the seminar begins In Ashland they will produce staged readings and design a final paper based on one of the productions These reviews will be delivered to the group and turned in on Thursday September 20 Note This seminar will convene in Ashland on Monday September 3 and will adjourn to Stanford on Sunday September 16 Students must arrive in Ashland by 4 00 p m on September 3 Room and board in Ashland and transportation to Stanford will be provided and paid for by the program Professor Alice Rayner teaches dramatic literature and theory in the drama department where she has been the Department Chair for the past year Her interests include the phenomenology of theater as well as comedy genre theory and rhetoric She has taught freshman seminars on Shakespeare as interpreted on stage and in film Her published books include Comic Persuasion To Act To Do To Perform Drama and the Phenomenology of Action and Ghosts Death s Double and the Phenomena of Theatre Professor Rayner s Bio Page Linda Paulson is Associate Dean and Director of Stanford s Master of Liberal Arts Program She received her Ph D in Comparative Literature from UCLA and has taught at Stanford since 1985 Her research focuses on the Victorian novel and on the development of a British woman s novel In 1989 she received Stanford s Dinkelspiel Award for Distinctive Contributions to Undergraduate Education She frequently lectures for Stanford Travel Study groups in England and France and has been taking Stanford undergraduates to the Oregon Shakespeare Festival since 1995 Linda Paulson s Bio Page Back to Top Lives of Consequence Graduate School of Business Prerequisites No prerequisites other than great interest in the topic This course examines how exceptionally creative individuals from a variety of domains including the arts sciences politics technology and society found a sense of purpose in their lives and then successfully pursued that purpose In the creative domain for example we examine the lives of filmmaker George Lucas Apple CEO Steve Jobs lifestyle designer Martha Stewart and master chef Thomas Keller In the political sphere we examine the lives of Margaret Thatcher Martin Luther King and Robert F Kennedy We also explore the work of individuals engaged in philanthropic efforts around the globe including Melinda Gates and Paul Farmer We complement the study of these individuals and others with a variety of readings from the social science literature on happiness meaning and creativity Students interested in psychology philosophy creativity the arts and sciences or business should find the course particularly useful and engaging Students working individually and in small groups will have a chance to apply the course concepts to their own lives using a series of reflective writing exercises Students will complete an independent research project on a topic or person of interest to them They will make a presentation to the class on the basis of their research The course is designed to be highly discussion oriented and interactive Students may take this course for either a letter grade or on a pass fail basis Letter grades for the course will be based upon the quality of the independent library research and class presentation along with the quality and consistency of class participation Both components research and class participation are equally weighted Professor Rod Kramer is a Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Stanford Business School He has written over one hundred articles and books on topics such as creativity decision making leadership power and trust He has taught and lectured around the world at Harvard Oxford Cambridge and the London Business School Professor Kramer s Bio Page Back to Top Measles and Sneezles and Things That Go Mumps in the Night Department of Microbiology and Immunology Prerequisites Strong motivation to learn and have fun Until recently measles was one of the leading causes of death in the world Contributing to its feared reputation is the fact that measles is the most contagious disease agent ever studied This course will look at measles and its relatives in the paramyxovirus family including mumps respiratory syncytial virus hendra and

    Original URL path: http://stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_ual/OO_soph_college_coursesandfaculty.html (2012-11-21)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Sophomore College: Student Staff Opportunities | Undergraduate Academic Life
    SCAs support the logistical elements necessary to create an immersion residential experience provide support and leadership in the classroom and with outside associated activities and will have some responsibilities as administrative liaisons between the faculty and September Studies staff Each faculty member will be assisted by two upper class Sophomore College Assistants who will fulfill the following roles Teaching Assistant My most important experience was during SCA office hours when multiple students brought their questions to me I loved being able to help them out and it was great to know that they had the comfort around me and confidence in my knowledge to approach me for help Resident Assistant Day to day life in the dorms helping students with papers discussing ideas or just talking about general life was the most important part of being an SCA Administrative Liaison Scheduling the field trips was the best growing experience for me I got to plan organize and execute programs The SCAs report to and collaborate with the faculty as well as a Residence Assistant Director in the dorm Training and orientation of SCAs are required and take place the weekend prior to the start of the program Some faculty will request SCA participation in on line discussions during the summer months Can I be an SCA Any student who will be a junior senior or co term student the academic year following Sophomore College and is in good academic standing is eligible to apply Note Co terminal students or recently graduated students are eligible to apply for SCA undergraduate positions In some instances one of the SCAs may be a graduate student The graduate SCA is required to live in residence with student participants SCAs exhibit the following qualifications Ability to articulate the goals of Sophomore College and to use sound judgment in supporting program goals Ability to be on call evenings weekends and during regular 8 to 5 working hours Demonstrated ability to take initiative work independently set priorities and follow through in a timely manner Ability to work effectively with a variety of people including a diverse student body Ability to maintain high level of humor self motivation and enthusiasm Demonstrated excellent organizational skills including the ability to manage and coordinate a variety of functions and to problem solve Ability to carefully plan and track financial expenditures Familiarity with University academic resources Academic or research experience relevant to the Sophomore College course content and sufficient to allow the SCA to serve as TA to Sophomore College faculty Conflicts SCAs cannot work a full or part time job or travel outside of required training or class activities during the program SCAs cannot participate in both Honors College and Arts Intensive either as staff or as a participant Because training for New Student Orientation NSO and most Residence Staff positions conflicts with the Sophomore College dates if you are selected for both positions you must choose between them Compensation Undergraduate SCAs receive a stipend of 1 000 in addition to

    Original URL path: http://stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_ual/OO_soph_college_SocoJobs.html (2012-11-21)
    Open archived version from archive



  •