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  • Global Heritage | Department of Anthropology
    often infringed Heritage implies ownership and yet in the modern world multiple communities feel they have a stake in the past Heritage increasingly also refers to the heritage industry and the commodification of the past Heritage is on the other hand often central to community identity and may have important roles to play in post conflict reconciliation Lynn Meskell has worked on these issues extensively in the Middle East and South Africa LINK to her book and is at present studying the World Heritage management of UNESCO based in Paris Ian Hodder has written about the application of human rights in heritage conflict and has explored ideas of community participation at Catalhoyuk in Turkey Barbara Voss with prior career experience in cultural resource management works closely with heritage managers and government archaeologists in the San Francisco Bay area to foster site preservation and community involvement in heritage policy and practice Her projects such as the Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project are developed in collaboration with community partners and integrate public archaeology with research practice John Rick leads conservation and community articulation in the World Heritage site of Chavin de Huantar confronting a range of pragmatic issues touching on heritage Bill

    Original URL path: http://stanford.edu/dept/anthropology/cgi-bin/web/?q=node/1089 (2012-11-21)
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  • Human Behavioral Ecology | Department of Anthropology
    Tinbergen and Robert Hinde and evolutionary ecology of scholars such as Robert MacArthur David Lack and Gordon Orians HBE focuses on understanding human behavioral plasticity and uses formal approaches to study the adaptive responses of people to environmental challenges particularly those related to core questions of subsistence and reproduction Within HBE Stanford maintains particular strength in the areas of foraging theory R Bird D W Bird Jones signaling theory R Bird ethnoarchaeology D W Bird demography and life history theory Jones R Bird and the analysis of risk in subsistence and reproductive decisions Jones R Bird All the current Stanford faculty with expertise in HBE are pursuing research and teaching agendas that seek to integrate the theories and methodologies of HBE with the analysis of decision making of actors in heterogeneous and nation states and transnational populations Cutting across all of these topics is a focus on how processes of adaptation and evolutionary change create variability and plasticity in human behavior culture and social systems and on the ways that such variability interacts dynamically with biotic and social environments at various spatial scales and at the individual community and population levels As such we offer training in a rigorous and holistic human ecology that links theory in behavioral community and population ecology link to the EE website The faculty maintain diverse research collaborations with faculty in numerous departments both at Stanford e g Political Science Biological Sciences Sociology Environmental and Earth Systems and in the broader global community e g Yale Utah Makere University University of Bristol University of Western Australia Australian National University These research collaborations provide extensive opportunities for fieldwork and training in a global context HBE students within the EE track work on a variety of projects examining the role of signaling in the performance of religious

    Original URL path: http://stanford.edu/dept/anthropology/cgi-bin/web/?q=node/1091 (2012-11-21)
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  • Human Ecology of Infectious Disease | Department of Anthropology
    the transmission of infectious disease the potentiation of epidemics and the possibilities for control and eradication of infectious diseases Specific areas of expertise include the role of heterogeneous contact networks on epidemic outcomes Jones anthropogenic environmental change and emerging infectious disease Jones Durham the global political economy of tropical infectious disease and health more generally Durham Curran Jones species interactions and the potential for zoonotic spillover Jones EE faculty working on the human ecology infectious disease maintain diverse collaborations with scholars in global health at Stanford e g Departments of Medicine Pediatrics Health Policy and Behavior Microbiology and Immunology Biological Sciences Environmental and Earth Systems The faculty are currently managing major research projects externally supported by organizations include NASA NIAID and NSF Durham and Jones co teach a highly interdisciplinary course on anthropogenic environmental change and emerging infectious disease that serves as a jumping off point for students interested in the field and engages undergraduates from multiple majors especially Human Biology and Earth Systems Students working in this area have pursued research on the human ecology of malaria in the Colombian Amazon the health and livelihood consequences of oil palm development social networks of sex workers the role of bushmeat

    Original URL path: http://stanford.edu/dept/anthropology/cgi-bin/web/?q=node/1095 (2012-11-21)
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  • Linguistic Anthropology | Department of Anthropology
    of Linguistic Anthropology is currently working on a book length project on the social history of verbatim in Japanese She traces the historical development of the Japanese shorthand technique used in the Diet for its proceedings since the late 19th century and of the stenographic typewriter introduced to the Japanese court for the trial record after WWII She is interested in learning what it means to be faithful to others by coping their speech and how the politico semiotic rationality of such stenographic modes of fidelity can be understood as a technology of a particular form of governance namely liberal governance Fox works on comparative Mayan and Mixe Zoquean historical linguistics and Mayan epigraphy and does field linguistics documentation of moribund languages in Mesoamerica Fox is also interested in the biology and evolution of language and in linguistic approaches to the environment The Department of Anthropology has a close relationship to the Department of Linguistics and affiliated Professor Penny Eckert of that department works on the dialectology and sociolinguistics of California and the Pyrenees We do not have a formal track in linguistic anthropology but do help students design language oriented programs within any of the current Anthropology tracks Research

    Original URL path: http://stanford.edu/dept/anthropology/cgi-bin/web/?q=node/1113 (2012-11-21)
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  • Materiality | Department of Anthropology
    design and Barbara Voss in her archaeological research on materiality identity and subjectivity Miyako Inoue is interested in the materiality of the sign and language in the forms of documents and files as well as the technical and technological infrastructure such as the typewriter and stenography that makes linguistic signification possible Angela Garcia explores the relationship between material and psychic life in both the United States and Mexico City Lynn Meskell has written about culturally embedded understandings of materiality in ancient Egypt South Africa and Turkey Understanding the relationships between people and things is a major strut of archaeological theory and Ian Hodder has written about the role of material culture in society and the entanglements between humans and things Duana Fullwiley chronicles the relationship between people and things within realms of science medicine and healing She has examined the role of a widely used botanical in Senegalese informal health sectors as one of several objects that mediate affective ties between chronic sufferers of sickle cell disease Working between Paris and Dakar she also shows how this medical material has largely been overlooked by geneticists who have focused on Senegalese genetic specificity to explain observations of mild sickle cell in

    Original URL path: http://stanford.edu/dept/anthropology/cgi-bin/web/?q=node/1097 (2012-11-21)
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  • Medical anthropology | Department of Anthropology
    understanding health and life Working in the United States and Mexico her work also demonstrates the urgent need for drug law reform and new approaches to ethics and therapeutics as they concern suffering in shared and transgressive formations Duana Fullwiley Professor Fullwiley explores how global and historical notions of health disease race and power yield biological consequences that bear on scientific definitions of human difference Through an ethnographic engagement with geneticists and the populations they study she underscores the importance of expanding the conceptual terrain of genetic causation to include poverty and on going racial stratification She explicitly writes in the long histories of inequality and dispossession suffered by global minorities that often go missing from medical narratives of genetic disease and ideas of population based severity Working in France West Africa and the United States she details the legacy effects of postcolonial post Reconstruction and Progressive Era science policies on present day health outcomes She also chronicles the remnants of racial thinking in new population genetic research and works with scientists to redress them Lochlann Jain Professor Jain s research is primarily concerned with the ways in which stories get told about injuries how they are thought to be caused and how that matters Figuring out the political and social significance of these stories has led to the study of law product design medical error and histories of engineering regulation corporations and advertising Jamie Jones Professor Jones is a biological anthropologist with general interests in human ecology and population biology Within this broad category he is primarily interested in three areas biodemography disease ecology and the evolution of human life histories Matthew Kohrman Professor Kohrman s work explores the ways health culture and politics are interrelated He focuses on the People s Republic of China He has written about disability the emergence of a state sponsored disability advocacy organization and the lives of Chinese men who have trouble walking He is now working on tobacco addiction and the state Tanya Luhrmann Professor Luhrmann is interested in the way the non material becomes real for people This leads her into the study of psychiatric illness psychosis in particular and the supernatural and spirituality and the way that different theories of mind may affect even someone s sensory experience in pathology and health What sets this program apart An engaged orientation Our group at Stanford believes that anthropological analysis is not just for anthropologists and not just for the classroom It matters elsewhere Whether it is cancer psychiatric disease drug addiction injury and disability racialized health disparities genetic disorders or the leading cause of premature death tobacco we tackle issues of great importance for people the world over In addressing the societal and bodily aspects of these problems we encourage our students to work with affected communities medical professionals basic scientists patient advocates and health NGOs while aiming to reach even larger publics The goal of our work is to advance the field of anthropology which is the disciplinary home of

    Original URL path: http://stanford.edu/dept/anthropology/cgi-bin/web/?q=node/1099 (2012-11-21)
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  • Population and Environment | Department of Anthropology
    population growth in tropical forests Curran Durham and the effects of anthropogenic fire on populations of endangered species in the Western Desert of Australia R Bird Our faculty have particular strengths in the interaction between human populations and the implications for biodiversity preservation and resource conservation Jones is the co Principal Investigator on a long running NICHD supported demographic training grant based at Stanford This grant has provided training for dozens of anthropology Ph D students from Stanford and many other research universities and regularly brings anthropological demographers to campus on a regular basis This project links Stanford s Anthropology department with other departments within the university especially Sociology Biological Sciences and Medicine and a network of US based and international population centers Jones is also on the executive committee of the new Stanford Center for Population Research SCPR where various Anthropology faculty Curran R Bird Durham maintain affiliations with SCPR Students working in this area have investigated the impact of violent death on marriage markets in Colombia the demography of hunter gatherers the impact of transmigration projects on the health and well being of forest people and the political economy of REDD projects Student research in the area of

    Original URL path: http://stanford.edu/dept/anthropology/cgi-bin/web/?q=node/1101 (2012-11-21)
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  • Sovereignty, the Modern State and Biopolitics | Department of Anthropology
    away from its historical focus on kingship and big man systems towards a focus on the historical formation of modern forms of sovereignty state authority and the modern government of bodies and populations through languages of science health and security Anthropologists have paid particular attention to how colonial forms of government left lasting marks on how political power has been performed and legitimized outside of Europe and America The modern nation state may be the dominant form of political authority and imagination today but it has taken many and specific forms across the world without completely removing or superseding older languages of power and public authority James Ferguson has explored developmental rationalities in Lesotho the anthropology of the state and the form of the state in Africa Thomas Blom Hansen has written on the anthropology of the modern state and sovereignty as well as performance and perceptions of public authority and the state in India and South Africa Kabir Tambar explores how the secular state in Turkey governs history and religious identities and Matthew Kohrman is exploring how the Chinese state intervenes in population health and works on individual bodies Research Strengths Anthropology and the Arts Anthropology of Religion Anthropology

    Original URL path: http://stanford.edu/dept/anthropology/cgi-bin/web/?q=node/1103 (2012-11-21)
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