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  • Mapping the Republic of Letters
    international project in the digital humanities centered at Stanford University Since 2008 we have been creating visualizations to analyze big data relating to the world of early modern scholars We focus primarily on their correspondence travel and social networks While we make use of quantitative metrics to examine the scope and dimensions of our data we remain committed to the qualitative methodologies of the humanities We actively encourage collaborations with

    Original URL path: http://republicofletters.stanford.edu/ (2012-12-14)
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  • Case Studies | Mapping the Republic of Letters
    Letters Visualizing Benjamin Franklin s Correspondence Network Mapping Galileo An Intellectual Map of Science in the Spanish Empire 1600 1810 Grand Tour Travelers A Jesuit s Letters Mapping Athanasius Kircher s Correspondence D Alembert s Correspondence Voltaire and the Enlightenment

    Original URL path: http://republicofletters.stanford.edu/case-study/ (2012-12-14)
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  • Blog | Mapping the Republic of Letters
    the Stanford Humanities Center in August 2012 You can see program details as well as a live blog of the activities at athanasius stanford edu The workshop was funded by the Presidential Fund for Innovation in the Humanities grant awarded to Dan Edelstein and Paula Findlen in 2008 Posted in MRofL News Leave a comment Grand Tour Goes to Davidson Posted on September 20 2012 by Sarah Murray From September 10 13th Giovanna Ceserani and Sarah Murray of the Grand Tour case study of Mapping the Republic of Letters conducted a series of classes and seminars at Davidson College Davidson NC During their visit to Davidson Ceserani and Murray held a seminar for faculty interested in bringing Digital Humanities into the classroom ran two in class workshops for students in Davidson s new Introduction to Classical Archaeology course and gave one lecture aimed at the broader community under the aegis of the Archaeological Institute of America local society AIA Central Carolinas The purpose of the visit was not only to spread the word about the innovative work being done by Mapping the Republic of Letters but also to introduce Davidson s students to the methods and theory involved in digital humanities research and to explain the benefits and obstacles of this kind of collaborative research to the Davidson community overall On Monday September 10th Ceserani and Murray held a workshop for faculty members Titled Mapping the Grand Tour A conversation on research and teaching in digital humanities this 1 5 hour session introduced interested faculty and staff to the pedagogical challenges and benefits of bringing digital humanities approaches into classroom teaching Issues addressed included the value aims and methods of collaborative digital projects for advancing knowledge and contributing to student learning Attendees at the seminar included professors from the Classics History English Political Science and Hispanic Studies departments Post Doctoral scholars in History and campus ITS specialists Ceserani and Murray gave a 45 minute presentation which was followed by a lively Q and A session in which a key topic was whether it was possible to bring a project like Mapping the Republic of Letters to a small liberal arts college such as Davidson Collaboration leads to innovation on the Grand Tour project On Tuesday morning the Grand Tour team took over Classics Prof Darian Totten s introductory course on Classical Archaeology Ceserani made some remarks about the Grand Tour as a historical phenomenon and discussed the relevance of 18th century intellectual history for those interested in Classical Archaeology Following this dynamic mini lecture Murray showed the students the visualizations that the Grand Tour project has been making over the last four years in their effort to better understand the Grand Tour Grand Tourists contemplate the freshness of a fish That evening Murray spoke to an enthusiastic and sizable audience of members of the general public at an event sponsored by the local Archaeological Institute of America chapter The title of the lecture was Grand Tour Travelers in Context A

    Original URL path: http://republicofletters.stanford.edu/blog/ (2012-12-14)
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  • About | Mapping the Republic of Letters
    Practices in the 17th century Dutch Republic Cultures of Knowledge Oxford Electronic Enlightenment Project Oxford Gephi Consortium Médialab SciencesPo Group D Alembert CNRS France National Publication of the Works of Antonio Vallisneri In the News December 14 2009 Stanford Report An extensive Stanford News piece about the overall work and missions of MRofL December 20 2009 History News Network A post featuring Dan Edelstein talking about how the project helps scholars get the big picture of the Enlightenment December 28th 2009 Early Modern Online Bibliography January 5th 2010 Andrew Piper McGill s Andrew Piper blogs about MRofL at The Book Report Be sure to read the spirited commentary on literary topology July 2010 Research Trends An article in the July 2010 issue of Research Trends newsletter about the project November 16th 2010 New York Times Arts Beat Blogger Patricia Cohen discusses the MRofL correspondence visualization in a blog post November 17th 2010 New York Times Patricia Cohen talks about the project in an article titled Digital Keys for Unlocking the Humanities Riches about the challenges and promise of geek poet alliances November 18 2010 Hindu Times Indian Hindu Times version of the New York Times writeup November 18 2010 ReMix An article on the Stanford University Library s blog ReMix in which Nicole Coleman discusses the collaborative work of the project as well as Elijah Meeks s role as Digital Humanities Specialist at Stanford and with RofL November 18th 2010 http hastac org Anna Rose Beck blogs about MRofL and the cartographic letter mapping tool in particular at HASTAC Humanities Arts Science and Technology Advanced Collaborative November 18th 2010 The Chicago Blog University of Chicago In response to the New York Times article November 2010 Dan Edelstein discusses the power of collaborative research November 18th 2010 Brain Pickings A post

    Original URL path: http://republicofletters.stanford.edu/about/ (2012-12-14)
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  • U.S. Intellectual History | Mapping the Republic of Letters
    S Intellectual History The Blog of the Society for U S Intellectual History discusses the Benjamin Franklin case study in his piece Was America Part of the Republic of Letters Click here to view the article Post navigation Early Modern

    Original URL path: http://republicofletters.stanford.edu/u-s-intellectual-history/ (2012-12-14)
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  • Early Modern Time & Networks | Mapping the Republic of Letters
    in the humanities around design data software studies collaboration and visualization The seminar series exposed the students to both the international scope of digital humanities research and groundbreaking projects taking place here at Stanford The afternoon collaborative sessions focused on gaining technical skills for managing digitized materials and developing a visual language to express their ideas The specifications for the tool to be developed as well as the fundamental design principles had been established in advance of the workshop based on this ongoing collaboration We wanted to test the tool with real case studies and improve the design through a collaborative development process The underlying principle guiding the development of visualization tools for Mapping the Republic of Letters is that tool development must be defined by humanities research questions and must involve humanities scholars in the design and development process The humanities researchers each brought their own case study to the workshop including databases or original sources for digitization Why build a new tool Existing network analysis tools are designed for quantitative methods Generally technologies that leverage scientific methods of analysis to identify trends and uncover patterns in data are effective when the data acted upon are assumed to be representative When working with data that are incomplete ambiguous and heterogeneous these methods are less effective Coincidentally we began development of our new networks visualization tool in collaboration with Sébastien Heymann and Romain Yon both contributors to the most popular desktop application for network visualization Gephi We had a shared interest in applying network visualization to the exploration of a database which involved a completely different approach and feature set The emphasis for our tool is on exploring multiple dimensions of data and loose affiliations between entities Though it is somewhat helpful to be able to visualize individuals with strong

    Original URL path: http://republicofletters.stanford.edu/early-modern-time-networks-2/ (2012-12-14)
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  • Grand Tour Goes to Davidson | Mapping the Republic of Letters
    hour session introduced interested faculty and staff to the pedagogical challenges and benefits of bringing digital humanities approaches into classroom teaching Issues addressed included the value aims and methods of collaborative digital projects for advancing knowledge and contributing to student learning Attendees at the seminar included professors from the Classics History English Political Science and Hispanic Studies departments Post Doctoral scholars in History and campus ITS specialists Ceserani and Murray gave a 45 minute presentation which was followed by a lively Q and A session in which a key topic was whether it was possible to bring a project like Mapping the Republic of Letters to a small liberal arts college such as Davidson Collaboration leads to innovation on the Grand Tour project On Tuesday morning the Grand Tour team took over Classics Prof Darian Totten s introductory course on Classical Archaeology Ceserani made some remarks about the Grand Tour as a historical phenomenon and discussed the relevance of 18th century intellectual history for those interested in Classical Archaeology Following this dynamic mini lecture Murray showed the students the visualizations that the Grand Tour project has been making over the last four years in their effort to better understand the Grand Tour Grand Tourists contemplate the freshness of a fish That evening Murray spoke to an enthusiastic and sizable audience of members of the general public at an event sponsored by the local Archaeological Institute of America chapter The title of the lecture was Grand Tour Travelers in Context A Digital Humanities Approach to 18th Century Social and Intellectual Networks In this talk Murray explained the overall research and methods of Mapping the Grand Tour and the ambitions that we have for integrating humanistic methods into research that engages with technology The audience was diverse comprising local high school students

    Original URL path: http://republicofletters.stanford.edu/grand-tour-goes-to-davidson/ (2012-12-14)
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  • Tools | Mapping the Republic of Letters
    with the number of letters sent received per year The timeline histogram is also linked to the Fineo flow graph If Gender is selected the gender data is populated in the timeline The same for Nationality and Milieux Both Ink and Inquiry were attempts to integrate temporal and spatial contexts for the display of correspondence What we discovered with these tools is that we were still missing a human scale view of the data What we wanted to see next were networks A network view would allow us to shift to the individual and communities as the base scale of the visualization The challenge is to reflect spatial temporal and relational dynamics in a network view of data INQUIRY September 2010 Inquiry was designed to address one of the greatest challenges for accessing a large heterogeneous data set the point of inquiry This tool allows you to explore correspondence across a number of different correspondence collections You can begin your search by selecting an author a place a time period or an archive FINEO July 2011 Pause Play Play Prev Next Within Mapping the Republic of Letters we call Fineo the Multi dimensional Relationship Viewer Fineo is a more elegant name but for us the beauty of Fineo is in being able to explore many different qualities of our data at once and in relation to each other Look at Athanasius Kircher s correspondence using Fineo here Or you can try Fineo with your own data PRIESTLEY INSPIRED TIMELINE November 2010 Pause Play Play Prev Next The Priestley Timeline is a visualization developed by the Grand Tour team of Mapping the Republic of Letters It represents an effort to track the movements of travelers in 18th century Rome The design was inspired by Joseph Priestley s Chart of Biography in which Priestley laid out the working lifetimes of various philosophers on a timeline to help the viewer understand the temporal relationships between different schools of thought and to trace intellectual influence In this version the timeline is interactive and searchable And rather than lifetimes duration of known trips to Rome by Grand Tour travelers are plotted This visualization represents a transformation of our project s primary data source Ingamells Dictionary of British and Irish Travelers in Italy 1701 1800 The visualization allows us to gain new insights into the data that would not otherwise be possible It is difficult to imagine that I could sit down and read through Ingamells dictionary and end up with a sense of the patterns in the travel of architects to Rome throughout the course of the 18th century However with a glance at the timeline the user can identify several patterns First more architects along with more travelers in general went to Rome in the second half of the 18th century Second architects tended to have longer stays in Rome during the later part of the century than in the early 1700s Third we can identify clusters of architects that may have been traveling

    Original URL path: http://republicofletters.stanford.edu/tools/ (2012-12-14)
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