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  • Fermi Large Area Telescope
    is 5 years and the goal for mission operations is 10 years The Fermi LAT instrument collaboration is an international effort funded by agencies in several countries The LAT is an imaging high energy gamma ray telescope covering the energy range from about 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV Such gamma rays are emitted only in the most extreme conditions by particles moving very nearly at the speed of light The LAT s field of view covers about 20 of the sky at any time and it scans continuously covering the whole sky every three hours Currently the LAT scientific collaboration includes more than 400 scientists and students at more than 90 universities and laboratories in 12 countries The collaboration has published papers on pulsars active galactic nuclei globular clusters cosmic ray electrons gamma ray bursts binary stars supernova remnants diffuse gamma ray sources and other subjects Data from the LAT are available to the public along with standard analysis software from NASA s Fermi Science Support Center For general questions about Fermi Fermi science or Fermi classroom materials please contact Fermi Answers Latest results The most recent publications from the LAT collaboration Recent preprints based on LAT results

    Original URL path: http://www-glast.stanford.edu/ (2014-02-25)
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  • The Fermi mission

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    Original URL path: /mission.html (2014-02-25)


  • Fermi Large Area Telescope Instrument
    shows more details of the instrument s design The 18 tungsten converter layers and 16 dual silicon tracker planes are stacked in 16 modular towers 37 cm square and 66 cm tall Each of the 16 calorimeter modules consists of 96 long narrow CsI scintillators stacked in 8 layers alternating in orientation so that the location and spread of the deposited energy can be determined The plastic anticoincidence scintillator around the outside is made of 89 individual sections so that it can distinguish charged particles coming from the direction of the incident gamma ray and ignore others A sophisticated flexible data acquisition system combines information from all the components to decide when a likely gamma ray has been detected and to choose what information to send to the ground The upper part of the instrument is wrapped in a multilayer blanket which provides thermal insulation and protects from micrometeoroids and debris The LAT is 0 72 m deep and 1 8 m square Its total mass is 2789 kg It uses 650 W of electric power Calibration and Performance Parts of the instrument were calibrated in particle beams at CERN SLAC and GSI but it was not possible to test the whole instrument with realistic gamma ray and proton beams The calibration relies on a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of all the instrument s components The simulation software was refined until its predictions agreed with the results obtained from beam tests and cosmic ray muons The performance of a gamma ray telescope can be characterized by its effective area field of view and angular resolution The field of view is very wide with useful response out to about 60 from the instrument axis covering about 20 of the sky The angular resolution depends on the gamma ray s energy its

    Original URL path: http://www-glast.stanford.edu/instrument.html (2014-02-25)
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  • NASA web sites
    NASA links Home Mission Instrument Institutions Publications NASA Pictures Internal NASA web sites NASA s official Fermi site Fermi mission site Fermi Science Support Center Fermi Education and Public Outreach

    Original URL path: http://www-glast.stanford.edu/nasa.html (2014-02-25)
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  • Fermi pictures
    floods the edges of field the high intensity yellow ring tracing Earth s limb Gamma ray sources in the sky along the relatively faint Milky Way stretch diagonally across the middle Launched June 11 2008 to explore the high energy Universe this week Fermi celebrated its 2 000th day in low Earth orbit This was NASA s Astronomy Picture of the Day APOD for December 06 2013 Exploring the cosmos at extreme energies the Fermi Gamma ray Space Telescope orbits planet Earth every 95 minutes By design it rocks to the north and then to the south on alternate orbits in order to survey the sky with its Large Area Telescope LAT The spacecraft also rolls so that solar panels are kept pointed at the Sun for power and the axis of its orbit precesses like a top making a complete rotation once every 54 days As a result of these multiple cycles the paths of gamma ray sources trace out complex patterns from the spacecraft s perspective like this mesmerising plot of the path of the Vela Pulsar Centered on the LAT instrument s field of view the plot spans 180 degrees and follows Vela s position from August 2008 through August 2010 The concentration near the center shows that Vela was in the sensitive region of the LAT field during much of that period Born in the death explosion of a massive star within our Milky Way galaxy the Vela Pulsar is a neutron star spinning 11 times a second seen as the brightest persistent source in the gamma ray sky This was NASA s Astronomy Picture of the Day APOD for May 04 2012 What shines in the gamma ray sky The answer is usually the most exotic and energetic of astrophysical environments like active galaxies powered

    Original URL path: http://www-glast.stanford.edu/pictures.html (2014-02-25)
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  • Upcoming Scientific Conferences of Interest to Fermi LAT Scientists
    Mar 20 Nov 1 Rencontres de Moriond Cosmology 2014 La Thuile Aosta Valley Italy 2014 Mar 22 Mar 29 Jan 31 The Structure and Signals of Neutron Stars from Birth to Death Arcetri Florence Italy 2014 Mar 24 Mar 28 Dec 31 Siam Physics Congress 2014 SPC2014 High Speed Physics Nakhon Ratchasima Thailand 2014 Mar 26 Mar 29 Feb 14 APS April Savannah GA 2014 Apr 5 Apr 8 Feb 7 26th Rencontres de Blois Particle Physics and Cosmology Blois France 2014 May 18 May 23 Apr 1 VULCANO Workshop 2014 Frontier Objects in Astrophysics and Particle Physics Vulcano Island Sicily Italy 2014 May 18 May 24 Feb 28 224th AAS Boston MA 2014 Jun 1 Jun 5 Extreme Astrophysics in an Ever Changing Universe Time Domain Astronomy in the 21st Century Ierapetra Crete Greece 2014 Jun 16 Jun 20 Apr 30 SPIE Astronomical Telescopes Instrumentation 2014 Montréal Quebec Canada 2014 Jun 22 Jun 27 Dec 9 Astroparticle Physics a joint IDM TeVPA conference Amsterdam the Netherlands 2014 Jun 23 Jun 28 Jun 1 COSPAR 2014 Moscow Russia 2014 Aug 2 Aug 10 Feb 14 HEAD Chicago IL 2014 Aug 17 Aug 21 The 10th INTEGRAL Workshop A Synergistic View of the High Energy Sky Annapolis MD 2014 Sep 15 Sep 19 IAU Symposium 313 Extragalactic Jets from Every Angle Puerto Ayora Galapagos Islands Ecuador 2014 Sep 15 Sep 19 Mar 1 5th Fermi Symposium Nagoya Japan 2014 Oct 20 Oct 25 225th AAS Seattle WA 2015 Jan 4 Jan 8 APS March San Antonio TX 2015 Mar 2 Mar 6 APS April Baltimore 2015 May 2 May 5 XXIV IAU General Assembly Honolulu HI 2015 Aug 1 Aug 14 MIAPP 2015 Workshop The many faces of neutron stars Garching Germany 2015 Aug 24 Sep 18 227th AAS Kissimmee FL

    Original URL path: http://www-glast.stanford.edu/conferences (2014-02-25)
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  • This is a test
    Mission Home Mission Instrument Institutions Publications NASA Pictures Internal

    Original URL path: http://www-glast.stanford.edu/mhead.html (2014-02-25)
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    Original URL path: https://www-glast.stanford.edu/cgi-prot/speaker (2014-02-25)
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