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  • Nicholas Lemann | The Transaction Society: Origins and Consequences (Lecture 2) | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    2014 At Koret Taube 130 Thu 16 Jan Event Overview This talk is called What Transactions Can t Do Lecture 2 of the Tanner Lectures In The Transaction Society Origins and Consequences Lemann plans to propose that American society fundamentally changed in the second half of the twentieth century from privileging institutions interacting in a pluralistic fashion to privileging transactions The first lecture will be an intellectual history tracing the broad turn against strong institutions as a social ideal in favor of efficiency and broad notions of fairness and justice The second lecture will be more specific about how this change in ethos manifested itself in actual social legal and economic arrangements and will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the social regime resulting from these changes Speaker Nicholas Lemann began his journalism career as a 17 year old writer for an alternative weekly newspaper there the Vieux Carre Courier He graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College in 1976 where he concentrated in American history and literature and was president of the Harvard Crimson After graduation he worked at the Washington Monthly as an associate editor and then managing editor at Texas Monthly as an associate editor and then executive editor at The Washington Post as a member of the national staff at The Atlantic Monthly as national correspondent and at The New Yorker as staff writer and then Washington correspondent On September 1 2003 he became dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University at the end of a process of re examination of the school s mission conducted by a national task force convened by the university s president Lee C Bollinger Lemann continues to contribute to The New Yorker as a staff writer He has published five books most recently Redemption The Last Battle

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/tanner-lectures/nicholas-lemann-the-transaction-society-origins-and-consequences-1 (2014-09-22)
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  • Discussion of Lecture 1 | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    College in 1976 where he concentrated in American history and literature and was president of the Harvard Crimson After graduation he worked at the Washington Monthly as an associate editor and then managing editor at Texas Monthly as an associate editor and then executive editor at The Washington Post as a member of the national staff at The Atlantic Monthly as national correspondent and at The New Yorker as staff writer and then Washington correspondent On September 1 2003 he became dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University at the end of a process of re examination of the school s mission conducted by a national task force convened by the university s president Lee C Bollinger Lemann continues to contribute to The New Yorker as a staff writer He has published five books most recently Redemption The Last Battle of the Civil War 2006 The Big Test The Secret History of the American Meritocracy 1999 which helped lead to a major reform of the SAT and The Promised Land The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America 1991 which won several book prizes Commentators Theda Skocpol PhD Harvard 1975 is the Victor S Thomas Professor of Government and Sociology at Harvard University At Harvard she has served as Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 2005 2007 and as Director of the Center for American Political Studies 2000 2006 In 1996 Skocpol served as President of the Social Science History Association an interdisciplinary professional group and in 2002 03 she served as President of the American Political Science Association during the centennial of this leading professional body In 2007 she was awarded the Johan Skytte Prize in Political Science for her visionary analysis of the significance of the state for revolutions welfare and

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/tanner-lectures/discussion-of-lecture-1 (2014-09-22)
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  • Nicholas Lemann | The Transaction Society: Origins and Consequences (Lecture 1) | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    15 2014 At Koret Taube 130 Wed 15 Jan Event Overview This talk is called The Turn Against Institutions lecture one of the Tanner Lectures In The Transaction Society Origins and Consequences Lemann plans to propose that American society fundamentally changed in the second half of the twentieth century from privileging institutions interacting in a pluralistic fashion to privileging transactions The first lecture will be an intellectual history tracing the broad turn against strong institutions as a social ideal in favor of efficiency and broad notions of fairness and justice The second lecture will be more specific about how this change in ethos manifested itself in actual social legal and economic arrangements and will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the social regime resulting from these changes Speaker Nicholas Lemann began his journalism career as a 17 year old writer for an alternative weekly newspaper there the Vieux Carre Courier He graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College in 1976 where he concentrated in American history and literature and was president of the Harvard Crimson After graduation he worked at the Washington Monthly as an associate editor and then managing editor at Texas Monthly as an associate editor and then executive editor at The Washington Post as a member of the national staff at The Atlantic Monthly as national correspondent and at The New Yorker as staff writer and then Washington correspondent On September 1 2003 he became dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University at the end of a process of re examination of the school s mission conducted by a national task force convened by the university s president Lee C Bollinger Lemann continues to contribute to The New Yorker as a staff writer He has published five books most recently Redemption The Last Battle

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/tanner-lectures/nicholas-lemann-the-transaction-society-origins-and-consequences (2014-09-22)
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  • Ethics and Religious Leaders | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    12 00pm on Wednesday November 20 2013 At Old Union CIRCLE Room 3rd Floor Wed 20 Nov Event Overview The job of a religious leader is hard to define We ask them to counsel us when we are faced with challenging circumstances and we look to them to help us celebrate life s joyous milestones We ask them to comfort and inspire us with their words and with their actions We want them to be approachable but also someone that carries a certain amount of authority and gravitas Given the many roles that religious leaders are asked to fill they are faced with many ethical challenges Please join Scotty McLennan Stanford s Dean for Religious Life Rabbi Mychal Copeland and Father Nathan Castle as they talk honestly about the unique ethical challenges they face as religious leaders Speaker Scotty McLennan is the Dean for Religious Life at Stanford His duties at Stanford include providing spiritual moral and ethical leadership for the university as a whole teaching encouraging a wide spectrum of religious traditions on campus serving as a minister of Memorial Church and engaging in public service Rabbi Mychal Copeland is a California native who joined us in 2003 as Rabbi and Senior Jewish Educator Prior to that she served as Associate Director of Jewish Student Life at Hillel of University of California Los Angeles Rabbi Copeland earned a Masters in Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School and a rabbinical degree from the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College Father Nathan Castle graduated from Trinity University in San Antonio and entered the Dominican order in 1979 He s served in campus ministries in California and Arizona for the last 20 years Prior to coming to Stanford Castle spent 12 years as Director of All Saints Catholic Newman Center serving Arizona State University and

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/ethics-and-the-professions-series/ethics-and-religious-leaders (2014-09-22)
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  • Baogang He | Wesson Discussion Seminar | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Professor He has published 50 book chapters 4 books of which 3 are single authored and 54 international journal papers resulting in total citation count of 1013 and Hirsch index of 15 His publications are found in top journals including British Journal of Political Science Journal of Peace Research and Perspectives on Politics In addition he published 3 books 15 book chapters and 63 journal papers in Chinese Many of his books and book chapters were published by very prestigious publishers including Cambridge University Press Oxford University Press and Routledge Several of Professor He s research works have been translated and published in other languages such as French German Italian Korean and Russian With an impressive track record of attracting 19 grants amounting to a total amount of 1 55m in research funding Professor He has actively collaborated in several key international research projects Professor He has also held several honorary appointments and research fellowships at renowned universities including Stanford University University of Cambridge Columbia University Leiden and Sussex University Commentators Josh Ober the Constantine Mitsotakis Chair in the School of Humanities and Sciences specializes in the areas of ancient and modern political theory and historical institutionalism He has a secondary appointment in the Department of Classics and a courtesy appointment in Philosophy His most recent book Democracy and Knowledge Innovation and Learning in Classical Athens was published by Princeton University Press in 2008 His ongoing work focuses on the theory and practice of democracy and the politics of knowledge and innovation Recent articles and working papers seek to explain economic growth in the ancient Greek world the relationship between democracy and dignity and the aggregation of expertise Lisa Blaydes is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Stanford University She is the author of Elections and Distributive Politics in Mubarak

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/wesson-lectures/baogang-he-wesson-discussion-seminar (2014-09-22)
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  • Baogang He | The Deliberative Turn in Chinese Political Development (Wesson Lecture 2) | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    new form of political rule and regime legitimacy This lecture develops a theoretical exploration of this authoritarian type of deliberative politics which is not considered by the current theorization of deliberative democracy The theory of authoritarian deliberation examines the different normative structure language and policy impact of authoritarian deliberation It analyses how authoritarian deliberation is strong at addressing the issue of political stability and the close link between deliberation and governance but is weak in dealing with the equal political influence of public deliberation The theory of authoritarian deliberation frames two possible trajectories of political development in China 1 The increasing use of deliberative practices stabilizes and strengthens authoritarian rule or 2 deliberative practices serve as a leading edge of democratization It makes a modest addition to the literature on deliberative democracy through examining the micro processes and mechanisms of deliberation led democratization in China Speaker Baogang He Professor Baogang He is the head of Public Policy and Global Affairs program at Nanyang Technological University Singapore and tenured Full Professor and Chair of International Studies program since 2005 at Deakin University Australia Graduated with PhD in Political Science from Australian National University in 1994 Professor He has become widely known for his work in Chinese democratization and politics in particular the deliberative politics in China Professor He has published 50 book chapters 4 books of which 3 are single authored and 54 international journal papers resulting in total citation count of 1013 and Hirsch index of 15 His publications are found in top journals including British Journal of Political Science Journal of Peace Research and Perspectives on Politics In addition he published 3 books 15 book chapters and 63 journal papers in Chinese Many of his books and book chapters were published by very prestigious publishers including Cambridge University Press

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/wesson-lectures/baogang-he-the-prospect-of-deliberative-authoritarianism-0 (2014-09-22)
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  • Baogang He | The Origin and Persistence of Confucian Deliberation in China (Wesson Lecture 1) | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    matters that affect them through distributions of empowerments such as votes and rights Deliberation is a mode of communication involving persuasion based influence It then proposes a theoretical reconstruction of deliberative culture which accounts for a proliferation of contemporary deliberative practices in China and the CCP s sponsorship of deliberative experiments and institutions The theoretical reconstruction of contemporary deliberative practices bears traces of the Confucian moral code of deliberation and the institutionalization of deliberation throughout the history of the Chinese imperial states The upshot in taking this theoretical approach is that we can confirm that the practice of deliberation in contemporary China is well and truly alive but it does not readily map with Western theoretical models of deliberative democracy This lecture sets up a contrast between an authoritarian deliberation the use of actual deliberative practices by the authoritarian state to improve governance and enhance its authority and the western idealized version of democratic deliberation It considers the limitations of the Chinese model of authoritarian deliberation and explains why and how it may constitute at least partially a defensible normative account of the contributions of deliberation to political legitimacy and in doing so hopes to illustrate some important historical lessons for Western deliberative democracy Speaker Baogang He Professor Baogang He is the head of Public Policy and Global Affairs program at Nanyang Technological University Singapore and tenured Full Professor and Chair of International Studies program since 2005 at Deakin University Australia Graduated with PhD in Political Science from Australian National University in 1994 Professor He has become widely known for his work in Chinese democratization and politics in particular the deliberative politics in China Professor He has published 50 book chapters 4 books of which 3 are single authored and 54 international journal papers resulting in total citation count of

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/wesson-lectures/baogang-he-the-origin-and-persistence-of-confucian-deliberation-in (2014-09-22)
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  • Ethics in an Energy Crisis: What Should We Do When Current Needs Conflict with Long-Term Sustainability? | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    of the world changes what role should rapidly developing nations share in the responsibility to address these issues Here we examine these issues through the lens of one country Pakistan which is struggling with a severe energy crisis that is holding back economic development and exacerbating political instability Ethicists economists and others have developed a set of useful tools for deciding what to do when economic environmental and social values conflict We will explain how some of these tools including cost benefit analysis the precautionary principle and principles of justice can help us evaluate aspects of the recent energy crisis in Pakistan in which many competing values are at play After months of rolling blackouts and documented impacts to economic growth the Pakistani government decided to meet the current needs of their citizens by investing in coal and other fossil fuel technologies rather than alternative sources of energy that many would argue are superior from the perspective of long run sustainability We use this example to illustrate how different general ethical theories use the tools we discuss to recommend different courses of action One upshot is that ethics has many sophisticated tools but also involves many important unresolved questions about how to make tradeoffs between different values how to respond to risk and uncertainty and so on Another upshot is that ethics alone cannot settle what should be done in such complex situations collaboration is also needed with those who have technical political and economic expertise However ethics can help clarify our reasoning make our assumptions about values more explicit and expose our values to critical scrutiny In sum we demonstrate the valuable role ethics can play when making decisions in the face of social and environmental challenges Speaker Mark Bryant Budolfson Mark Budolfson received his PhD from Princeton and before coming to Stanford he was a postdoc at the Center for the Philosophy of Freedom at the University of Arizona He is interested in all areas of philosophy and often works on topics in ethics social philosophy and epistemology His current research includes work on the nature of normativity the legitimacy of international institutions environmental ethics and general issues at the interface of ethics and public policy especially in connection with collective action problems such as climate change and other dilemmas that arise in connection with common resources and public goods Blake Francis is a Phd Candidate in the Department of Philosophy at Stanford University His research interests include social and political philosophy and environmental ethics He is currently working on a dissertation on climate change ethics which examines how to make trade offs between the harms of climate change and the social benefits provided by fossil fuel use He received an M A in philosophy from the University of Montana where he also conducted research in the Department of Forestry and Conservation Prior to pursuing graduate work Blake had a career in wilderness management and trail construction with the US Forest Service in Arizona and Alaska Hyunseop Kim

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/special-lectures/ethics-in-an-energy-crisis-what-should-we-do-when-current-needs (2014-09-22)
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