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  • Panel Discussion: WAR: Ethical Challenges on the Horizon | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Fulfill Stanford Ethical Reasoning Requirement EthicSoc Courses Summer Fellowships Human Rights Fellowships FAQs Sample Human Rights Fellowships Apply for a Summer Fellowship Graduate Ethics Research Ethics Course Summer 2014 Graduate Student Fellowships Dirty Leviathan Retreat Postdoc Fellows Fellowships Application Process FAQs Fellowship Experience Research Equality of Opportunity and Education Working Papers Beyond the Farm Hope House Scholars Program The Tutoring Experience 10th Anniversary Past Courses Community Outreach You are here Home Events Lectures Panel Discussion WAR Ethical Challenges on the Horizon Events Panel Discussion WAR Ethical Challenges on the Horizon Ethics and War 4 30pm on Wednesday May 16 2012 At Tresidder Memorial Union Wed 16 May Event Overview This panel discussion marks the end of Stanford s two year Ethics War series Our panelists will focus on What future challenges will force leaders to rethink the balance between morality and war What will this ethical debate look like How will these paradigm shifts affect national security Discussion Q A session with Charles Dunlap Maj General USAF Ret Center on Law Ethics and National Security Duke Scotty McLennan Dean for Religious Life Stanford Scott Sagan Center for International Security and Cooperation and Political Science Stanford Debra Satz Philosophy and Center

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/ethics-and-war/panel-discussion-war-ethical-challenges-on-the-horizon (2014-09-22)
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  • Richard Banks | Is Marriage for White People? How the African American Marriage Decline Affects Everyone | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Graduate Student Fellowships Dirty Leviathan Retreat Postdoc Fellows Fellowships Application Process FAQs Fellowship Experience Research Equality of Opportunity and Education Working Papers Beyond the Farm Hope House Scholars Program The Tutoring Experience 10th Anniversary Past Courses Community Outreach You are here Home Events Lectures Richard Banks Is Marriage for White People How the African American Marriage Decline Affects Everyone Events Richard Banks Is Marriage for White People How the African American Marriage Decline Affects Everyone Ethics Noon 12 00pm on Friday May 11 2012 At Bldg 110 Rm 112 Fri 11 May Event Overview Ralph Richard Banks is the Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and Professor by courtesy at the School of Education Banks teaches and writes about family law employment discrimination law and race and the law He is the author of Is Marriage for White People How the African American Marriage Decline Affects Everyone His writings have appeared in a wide range of popular and scholarly publications including the Stanford Law Review the Yale Law Journal the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times He has been interviewed and quoted by numerous print and broadcast media including ABC News Nightline National Public

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/ethicsnoon/richard-banks-is-marriage-for-white-people-how-the-african-american (2014-09-22)
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  • Richard Rhodes: Reykjavik | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Experience 10th Anniversary Past Courses Community Outreach You are here Home Events Lectures Richard Rhodes Reykjavik Events Richard Rhodes Reykjavik Ethics and War 7 00pm on Tuesday May 8 2012 At CEMEX Auditorium Tue 8 May Event Overview One act play by Richard Rhodes taken from the transcripts of the historic 1986 summit meeting between Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev Q A sessions follow play May 8 Richard Rhodes playwright author and Center for International Security and Cooperation Stanford May 9 Charles Ferguson President of the Federation of American Scientists In October 1986 a historic summit meeting was held at Reykjavik Iceland between the United States under the leadership of President Ronald Reagan and the Soviet Union under the leadership of President Mikhail Gorbachev What began as a summit with an agenda of limited reduction of nuclear weapons and human rights quickly transformed into a discussion by the two leaders advocating for elimination of all nuclear weapons The prospect of a world without nuclear weapons had never before been held at such a high level and has never been held since These negotiations were truly historic and in many ways groundbreaking in helping to end the Cold War Reykjavik a one act play written by Richard Rhodes is a dialogue taken from the actual transcripts of the negotiations between the two presidents Rhodes is the author or editor of twenty four works of history memoir and fiction including The Making of the Atomic Bomb which won a Pulitzer Prize a National Book Award and a National Book Critics Circle Award A past visiting scholar at MIT and Harvard University he is presently an associate of the Stanford Center for International Security and Cooperation The play runs for seventy five minutes and will be followed by a question and answer session

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/ethics-and-war/richard-rhodes-reykjavik (2014-09-22)
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  • Karl Eikenberry | The Ethical Dimension of Wartime Commands and Organizations | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Working Papers Beyond the Farm Hope House Scholars Program The Tutoring Experience 10th Anniversary Past Courses Community Outreach You are here Home Events Lectures Karl Eikenberry The Ethical Dimension of Wartime Commands and Organizations Events Karl Eikenberry The Ethical Dimension of Wartime Commands and Organizations Ethics Noon 12 00pm on Friday May 4 2012 At Bldg 110 Rm 112 Fri 4 May Event Overview Leaders of military commands and government organizations operating in conflict zones often face ethical dilemmas as they carry out their missions Integrity in reporting is vital but bearers of bad news are sometimes understandably concerned with professional ramifications Conduct on the battlefield must be rule bound but when violations occur leaders prefer if at all possible to deal with them internally even when protocols might require or suggest informing higher echelons Proven subordinates who make a rare but serious error in judgment may be subject to adverse personnel action and seek protection from their leaders who in turn must consider fairness and protocol Ambassador Karl Eikenberry drawing upon his experiences as a military commander and leading the US Embassy in Afghanistan as well as assignments in other parts of the world as a US Army officer will discuss these challenges and ways to mitigate organizational risk Karl Eikenberry is the Payne Distinguished Lecturer at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University Prior to his arrival at Stanford Eikenberry served as the U S Ambassador to Afghanistan from May 2009 until July 2011 where he led the civilian surge directed by President Obama to reverse insurgent momentum and set the conditions for transition to full Afghan sovereignty Before his appointment as Chief of Mission in Kabul Ambassador Eikenberry had a thirty five year career in the United States Army retiring in April 2009 with

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/ethicsnoon/karl-eikenberry-the-ethical-dimension-of-wartime-commands-and (2014-09-22)
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  • Mark Juergensmeyer: Global Religious Challenges to the Secular State | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Education Working Papers Beyond the Farm Hope House Scholars Program The Tutoring Experience 10th Anniversary Past Courses Community Outreach You are here Home Events Lectures Mark Juergensmeyer Global Religious Challenges to the Secular State Events Mark Juergensmeyer Global Religious Challenges to the Secular State Ethics and War 7 00pm on Thursday May 3 2012 At Annenberg Auditorium Thu 3 May Event Overview Mark Juergensmeyer is director of the Orfalea Center for Global and International Studies professor of sociology and affiliate professor of religious studies at the University of California Santa Barbara He is an expert on religious violence conflict resolution and South Asian religion and politics and has published more than two hundred articles and twenty books including the recently released Global Rebellion Religious Challenges to the Secular State His widely read Terror in the Mind of God The Global Rise of Religious Violence is based on interviews with religious activists around the world including individuals convicted of the 1993 World Trade Center bombing leaders of Hamas and abortion clinic bombers in the United States and was listed by the Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times as one of the best nonfiction books of the year One of Juergensmeyer

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/ethics-and-war/mark-juergensmeyer-global-religious-challenges-to-the-secular-state (2014-09-22)
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  • Julie Reed | Cheap Trick: Ethical Considerations in Cultivating Campus-Community Partnerships | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Leviathan Retreat Postdoc Fellows Fellowships Application Process FAQs Fellowship Experience Research Equality of Opportunity and Education Working Papers Beyond the Farm Hope House Scholars Program The Tutoring Experience 10th Anniversary Past Courses Community Outreach You are here Home Events Lectures Julie Reed Cheap Trick Ethical Considerations in Cultivating Campus Community Partnerships Events Julie Reed Cheap Trick Ethical Considerations in Cultivating Campus Community Partnerships Ethics Noon 12 00pm on Friday April 27 2012 At Bldg 110 Rm 112 Fri 27 Apr Event Overview American universities and the local communities in which they reside often interact in the spirit of pursuing the common good Their noble intentions may appear simple but the relationships and processes necessary for the partnership can become complex nuanced and ever changing Efforts to do the right thing and make a difference can obscure other realities beneath the surface power imbalances inaccurate assumptions and communication challenges In this context are these collaborators obligated to ensure that the processes are reciprocal and that the outcomes are mutually beneficial Or is it every stakeholder for itself as long as they do no harm Is one entity inevitably more dependent on the other or are they interdependent whether seen or unseen I need you to need me I m beggin you to beg me Using a hypothetical case study Julie Reed and Jeffrey Betcher will facilitate a discussion of these ethical issues in campus community partnerships Julie Reed is the Associate Director for Community Engaged Scholarship at the Haas Center where she provides leadership strategic guidance and professional development for Stanford faculty graduate students and community partners engaged in teaching service learning courses and conducting community based research Previously Reed directed the University of San Francisco s Office of Service Learning and Community Actions and Gettysburg College s Center for Public

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/ethicsnoon/julie-reed-cheap-trick-ethical-considerations-in-cultivating-campus (2014-09-22)
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  • Michael Walzer | Can the Good Guys Win?: Moral Dilemmas in Asymmetric War | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Summer 2014 Graduate Student Fellowships Dirty Leviathan Retreat Postdoc Fellows Fellowships Application Process FAQs Fellowship Experience Research Equality of Opportunity and Education Working Papers Beyond the Farm Hope House Scholars Program The Tutoring Experience 10th Anniversary Past Courses Community Outreach You are here Home Events Lectures Michael Walzer Can the Good Guys Win Moral Dilemmas in Asymmetric War Events Michael Walzer Can the Good Guys Win Moral Dilemmas in Asymmetric War Ethics and War 5 30pm on Thursday April 26 2012 At Annenberg Auditorium Thu 26 Apr Event Overview In the lecture Walzer will address the criticism that is current among some soldiers and academic strategists these days that if you try to fight an asymmetric war in accordance with the US rules of engagement or the requirements of just war theory you will lose the war He will argue that the good guys can win not that they will certainly win without adopting the methods of the bad guys One of America s foremost political thinkers Michael Walzer has written about a wide variety of topics in political theory and moral philosophy including political obligation just and unjust war nationalism and ethnicity economic justice and the welfare state He has played a critical role in the revival of a practical issue focused ethics and in the development of a pluralist approach to political and moral life Walzer s books include Just and Unjust Wars On Toleration and Arguing About War He has served as editor of the political journal Dissent for more than three decades Currently he is working on issues having to do with international justice and the new forms of welfare and also on a collaborative project focused on the history of Jewish political thought Michael Walzer is also giving the Aaron Roland Endowed Lecture on April

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/ethics-and-war/michael-walzer-can-the-good-guys-win-moral-dilemmas-in-asymmetric-war (2014-09-22)
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  • Craig Garner | Ethical Issues Associated with Developing Pharmacotherapies for Cognitive Impairment in Down Syndrome | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Farm Hope House Scholars Program The Tutoring Experience 10th Anniversary Past Courses Community Outreach You are here Home Events Lectures Craig Garner Ethical Issues Associated with Developing Pharmacotherapies for Cognitive Impairment in Down Syndrome Events Craig Garner Ethical Issues Associated with Developing Pharmacotherapies for Cognitive Impairment in Down Syndrome Ethics Noon 12 00pm on Friday April 13 2012 At Bldg 200 Rm 303 Fri 13 Apr Event Overview For decades parents with children with Down syndrome were told to take them home and love them as they were considered to have irreversible intellectual disabilities Studies in animal models of Down syndrome have shown that the triplication of genes on chromosome 21 do not fatally disrupt neuronal circuit function and that a growing number of drug based strategies can be used to enhance cognitive function Some parents welcome these new possibilities while others fear that cognitive enhancers will adversely affect their children and want no part of them What ethical consideration should guide this wave of potential change Craig Garner is a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford He is also the co director of the Stanford Center for Research and Treatment of Down Syndrome He

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/ethicsnoon/craig-garner-ethical-issues-associated-with-developing-pharmacotherapies (2014-09-22)
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