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  • John Cooper | Ancient Philosophies as Ways of Life: Socrates (Lecture 1) | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Ethics Research Ethics Course Summer 2014 Graduate Student Fellowships Dirty Leviathan Retreat Postdoc Fellows Fellowships Application Process FAQs Fellowship Experience Research Equality of Opportunity and Education Working Papers Beyond the Farm Hope House Scholars Program The Tutoring Experience 10th Anniversary Past Courses Community Outreach You are here Home Events Lectures Tanner Lectures John Cooper Ancient Philosophies as Ways of Life Socrates Lecture 1 Events John Cooper Ancient Philosophies as Ways of Life Socrates Lecture 1 Tanner Lectures 8 00am on Wednesday January 25 2012 At Stanford Humanities Center Wed 25 Jan Event Overview Ancient Philosophies as Ways of Life John Cooper Philosophy Princeton John Cooper is the author of Reason and Human Good in Aristotle which was awarded the American Philosophical Association s Franklin Matchette Prize and two collections of essays Reason and Emotion Essays on Ancient Moral Psychology and Ethical Theory 1999 and Knowledge Nature and the Good Essays on Ancient Philosophy 2004 His work in ancient Greek philosophy spans the areas of metaphysics moral psychology philosophy of mind ethics and political theory Lecture I Ancient Philosophies as a Way of Life Socrates Lecture II Platonist Philosophy as a Way of Life Plotinus Respondents Alan Code Philosophy Stanford Anthony

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/tanner-lectures/john-cooper-ancient-philosophies-as-ways-of-life-socrates-lecture-1 (2014-09-22)
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  • Charlie Miller | Preserving Decision Space Under Pressure: A Reflection from 'the Surge' into Iraq | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Fellowship Graduate Ethics Research Ethics Course Summer 2014 Graduate Student Fellowships Dirty Leviathan Retreat Postdoc Fellows Fellowships Application Process FAQs Fellowship Experience Research Equality of Opportunity and Education Working Papers Beyond the Farm Hope House Scholars Program The Tutoring Experience 10th Anniversary Past Courses Community Outreach You are here Home Events Lectures Charlie Miller Preserving Decision Space Under Pressure A Reflection from the Surge into Iraq Events Charlie Miller Preserving Decision Space Under Pressure A Reflection from the Surge into Iraq Ethics Noon 12 00pm on Friday January 13 2012 At Bldg 110 Rm 112 Fri 13 Jan Event Overview The U S military completed the drawdown in Iraq in December 2011 That drawdown was made possible by a variety of factors to include the so called Surge in 2007 and 2008 The Surge itself was hugely controversial at the time it was announced and remained so through the Presidential election cycle This talk will provide insight on the political pressure senior leaders in Baghdad were under and how they thought about assessing the success of the Surge as they reported back to Washington to include the heated September 2007 testimony to Congress by General David Petraeus and Ambassador Ryan Crocker The example of how General Petraeus who Colonel Miller worked directly for at the time set the parameters for thinking about the problem and preserved his decision space will be the focus of the discussion Miller a Colonel in the U S Army is currently serving as a Visiting Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation From 2009 to 2011 Miller worked at the National Security Council Executive Office of the President as Director of Iraq where he briefed senior government officials on Iraq From 2008 to 2009 he was a Special Assistant to the Chairman of

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/ethicsnoon/charlie-miller-preserving-decision-space-under-pressure-a-reflection-from (2014-09-22)
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  • Lawrence Wright | Beyond Terror: American After bin Laden | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Equality of Opportunity and Education Working Papers Beyond the Farm Hope House Scholars Program The Tutoring Experience 10th Anniversary Past Courses Community Outreach You are here Home Events Lectures Lawrence Wright Beyond Terror American After bin Laden Events Lawrence Wright Beyond Terror American After bin Laden Ethics and War 7 00pm on Thursday January 12 2012 At Cemex Auditorium Thu 12 Jan Event Overview Lawrence Wright is an author screenwriter playwright and a staff writer for The New Yorker magazine His history of al Qaeda The Looming Tower Al Qaeda and the Road to 9 11 was published to immediate and widespread acclaim spending eight weeks on The New York Times best seller list and being translated into twenty five languages It was nominated for the National Book Award and won the Lionel Gelber Award for nonfiction the Los Angeles Times Award for History the J Anthony Lukas Book Prize the New York Public Library Helen Bernstein Book Award for Excellence in Journalism and the Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction The NYU School of Journalism recently honored the book as one of the ten best works of journalism in the previous decade Wright will be in conversation with Tobias Wolff

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/ethics-and-war/beyond-terror-american-after-bin-laden-0 (2014-09-22)
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  • Terry Winograd | Designing at a Distance | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Past Courses Community Outreach You are here Home Events Lectures Terry Winograd Designing at a Distance Events Terry Winograd Designing at a Distance Ethics Noon 12 00pm on Friday December 2 2011 At Bldg 110 Rm 112 Fri 2 Dec Event Overview For the past two years Winograd has collaborated with Joshua Cohen to teach a course at the Stanford d school called Designing Liberation Technologies Small interdisciplinary student teams develop new ideas for dealing with problems in health and development in some of the poorest neighborhoods informal settlements of Nairobi Kenya The ideal is for the students to create innovations that can bring real improvements to people s lives The reality is that we are only one part of a larger technical economic system and our efforts to do good may actually create more problems than they solve We don t have answers but have grappled with some of the questions about how students with a bounded amount of commitment can ethically work in an environment that is distant both in miles and in culture and wealth Professor Winograd s focus is on human computer interaction design and the design of technologies for development He directs the teaching programs

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/ethicsnoon/terry-winograd-designing-at-a-distance (2014-09-22)
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  • Copenhagen | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Process FAQs Fellowship Experience Research Equality of Opportunity and Education Working Papers Beyond the Farm Hope House Scholars Program The Tutoring Experience 10th Anniversary Past Courses Community Outreach You are here Home Events Lectures Copenhagen Events Copenhagen Ethics and War 8 00pm on Thursday December 1 2011 At Pigott Theater Thu 1 Dec Event Overview We are pleased to present 4 performances of Copenhagen Michael Frayn s 1998 play The play is directed by Rush Rehm Stanford Summer Theater Artistic Director and Stanford Professor of Drama and Classics and stars Julian Lopez Morillas Peter Ruocco and Courtney Walsh In 1941 German physicist Werner Heisenberg visited his Danish counterpart Niels Bohr in Nazi occupied Copenhagen where they discussed the development of nuclear weapons What really happened in their encounter Given the unreliability of memory the indeterminacy of personal motives and the uncertainty at the core of things how can we ever know Frayn s Copenhagen asks impossible questions and with the nuclear threat still over us demands that we find the answers Post show discussion with the cast and director of Copenhagen follows the Sat Dec 3 matinee Pre show discussion from 7 15 7 45pm before the Sat Dec 3 evening performance Performances schedule December 1 2 at 8pm and December 3 at 2pm 8pm Pre show discussion with Scott Sagan will take place from 7 15 7 45pm before the Saturday December 3 8 00pm performance Sagan is Caroline S G Munro Professor of Political Science and a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute He also serves as the co chair of the American Academy of Arts and Science s Global Nuclear Future Initiative Please note that there will be no late seating Purchase tickets Copenhagen has won three 2000 Tony Awards including Best Play The Drama Desk

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/ethics-and-war/copenhagen-0 (2014-09-22)
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  • David Magnus | Ethical Issues and Organ Transplantation | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Course Summer 2014 Graduate Student Fellowships Dirty Leviathan Retreat Postdoc Fellows Fellowships Application Process FAQs Fellowship Experience Research Equality of Opportunity and Education Working Papers Beyond the Farm Hope House Scholars Program The Tutoring Experience 10th Anniversary Past Courses Community Outreach You are here Home Events Lectures David Magnus Ethical Issues and Organ Transplantation Events David Magnus Ethical Issues and Organ Transplantation Ethics Noon 12 00pm on Friday November 18 2011 At Bldg 110 Rm 112 Fri 18 Nov Event Overview This talk focuses on the issues of justice that arise in listing decisions the way organs are distributed and in the solicitation of organs as well as the ethical challenges and opportunities present in Donation after Cardiac Death David Magnus is the Thomas A Raffin Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics the Director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics and co Chair of the Ethics Committee for the Stanford Health Center He is also Director of the Scholarly Concentration in Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities in the School of Medicine Magnus s current areas of interest are Genetic testing gene therapy genetically engineered organisms and the history of eugenics stem cell research and cloning and egg procurement examining ethical

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/ethicsnoon/david-magnus-ethical-issues-and-organ-transplantation (2014-09-22)
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  • War and Children's Lives: Before, During and After | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Sample Human Rights Fellowships Apply for a Summer Fellowship Graduate Ethics Research Ethics Course Summer 2014 Graduate Student Fellowships Dirty Leviathan Retreat Postdoc Fellows Fellowships Application Process FAQs Fellowship Experience Research Equality of Opportunity and Education Working Papers Beyond the Farm Hope House Scholars Program The Tutoring Experience 10th Anniversary Past Courses Community Outreach You are here Home Events Lectures War and Children s Lives Before During and After Events War and Children s Lives Before During and After Ethics and War 7 00pm on Thursday November 17 2011 At Cubberley Auditorium Thu 17 Nov Event Overview Paul Wise is the Richard E Behrman Professor of Child Health and Society Professor of Pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine and Senior Fellow in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University He is Director of the Center for Policy Outcomes and Prevention and a core faculty of the Centers for Health Policy and Primary Care Outcomes Research at Stanford University Wise is also the founder of The Children in Crisis initiative a Stanford program that links life saving child health interventions with political reform It is the first academic initiative to address the needs of children in areas

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/ethics-and-war/war-and-childrens-lives-before-during-and-after (2014-09-22)
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  • Reporting Guantanamo: America's Experiment in Extraterritorial Detention | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Fellowships FAQs Sample Human Rights Fellowships Apply for a Summer Fellowship Graduate Ethics Research Ethics Course Summer 2014 Graduate Student Fellowships Dirty Leviathan Retreat Postdoc Fellows Fellowships Application Process FAQs Fellowship Experience Research Equality of Opportunity and Education Working Papers Beyond the Farm Hope House Scholars Program The Tutoring Experience 10th Anniversary Past Courses Community Outreach You are here Home Events Lectures Reporting Guantanamo America s Experiment in Extraterritorial Detention Events Reporting Guantanamo America s Experiment in Extraterritorial Detention Ethics and War 4 30pm on Wednesday November 16 2011 At Bldg 260 Room 113 Main Quad Wed 16 Nov Event Overview Carol Rosenberg has covered the proceedings in the U S prison camps in Guantánamo Bay for The Miami Herald for nine years Earlier this year she was awarded the Robert F Kennedy Journalism Award which recognizes outstanding reporting on human rights and social justice At the time of her award the RFK Center for Justice and Human Rights reported that Rosenberg had logged more time at Guantanamo than any other reporter taking on the task of ensuring that this important story is not forgotten In this talk Rosenberg focuses on the challenges of operating as a journalist in Guantanamo

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/events/lectures/ethics-and-war/reporting-guantanamo-americas-experiment-in-extraterritorial-0 (2014-09-22)
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