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  • I am having a problem with Interfolio. Who should I contact? | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Ethics Research Ethics Course Summer 2014 Graduate Student Fellowships Dirty Leviathan Retreat Postdoc Fellows Fellowships Application Process FAQs Fellowship Experience Research Equality of Opportunity and Education Working Papers Beyond the Farm Hope House Scholars Program The Tutoring Experience 10th Anniversary Past Courses Community Outreach You are here Home I am having a problem with Interfolio Who should I contact I am having a problem with Interfolio Who should I contact

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/i-am-having-a-problem-with-interfolio-who-should-i-contact (2014-09-22)
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  • Working Papers | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    unidentified others Stanford Ober Josiah Center for Ethics in Society Advisory Board member January 2012 Weighted Expertise Aggregation An Aristotelian Middle Way for Epistemic Democracy Decision making in an epistemic democracy takes into account not only citizens interests but also their knowledge about the world The dominant epistemic approaches to democratic decision making focus on aggregation of independent guesses and on deliberation but neither offers a satisfactory means of decision making that is at once time sensitive and capable of setting agendas endogenously Analysis of two passages by Aristotle points to a hybrid middle way that transcends these limitations Weighted Expertise Aggregation WEA conjoins diverse forms of expertise in multiple domains through a time sensitive process of deliberation and voting WEA differs from a Condorcet jury in aggregating the marginal probability of correct judgments on domainexperts rather than on the substance of complex issues Although it requires procedurally competent voters who share common knowledge WEA offers a realistic approach to decision making in democratic organizations Stanford Ober Josiah Center for Ethics in Society Advisory Board member January 2012 Democracy s Dignity Dignity as equal high standing characterized by non humiliation and noninfantilization is along with liberty and equality a necessary condition for collective selfgovernance by citizens Dignity ensures that citizens political liberty and equality can be robustly exercised and resists infantilizing tendencies of strong libertarianism and egalitarianism The civic dignity required by minimal democracy is specified through a taxonomy of partially moralized aristocratic dignity and in comparison with fully moralized universal human dignity Distinctive features of different kinds of dignity are demonstrated by simple formalized games and animated by historical case studies Unlike meritocratic and human dignity a civic dignity regime achieves self enforcing equilibrium in the population of incompletely moral social agents assumed in non ideal theory it does so because citizens are well motivated to aid those threatened with indignity and have resources for coordinated collective action Constrained forms of meritocracy and civic dignity persist within liberal democracy Stanford Satz Debra Center for Ethics in Society Director March 2012 Unequal Chances Race Class and Schooling This paper compares a demanding conception of educational adequacy with the Rawlsian idea of fair equality of opportunity It defends fair equality of opportunity against criticisms but argues that it needs to be explicitly anchored in a theory of equal citizenship University of Washington at Tacoma McHose Brad Center for Ethics in Society former postdoc March 2012 A Critical Assessment of Rawlsian Distributive Justice Part One Pogge s Imposition Argument Thomas Pogge in his Realizing Rawls offers an argument for the difference principle This argument is driven by the idea that a country s basic structure generates inequalities amongst the life prospects of the country s members I argue that Pogge s argument falls well short since 1 Pogge substantially underspecifies when a country s basic structure counts for purposes of his argument as generating such inequalities and 2 it is very unclear whether there is any notion of such generation on which

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/working-papers?order=field_school&sort=asc (2014-09-22)
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  • For Baogang He, influence of authoritative deliberation in China is underestimated | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Chinese democratization An increasing number of Chinese intellectuals see the development of deliberative processes within authoritarian institutions as a pathway to democracy He writes Some hold that democratization could develop from within one party rule if the kinds level and density of reforms alter its character in ways that produce the functional effects of democracy If this trajectory were to materialize He goes on it would be unique We know of no examples of regime democratization as a consequence of progress ively institutionalized deliberation Remonstrations Professor He began his analysis of authoritarian deliberation by examining the long Chinese tradition of remonstration founded in Confucian political thought Court officials attempted andfrequently succeeded in influencing the Emperor to alter his policy in order to serve the common good There are three key elements to these remonstrations They must occur in public they must appeal to the reason and they must aim at the good of all This He suggests is political deliberation the use of a heart to heart talk in order to persuade and influence without democracy He then argues that this kind of non democratic deliberation suitably adapted to modernity is common in today s China The Chinese Communist Party is undeniably authoritarian jailing dissidents and prohibiting open political discussion of any reforms that might weaken its control Yet local governance has increasingly become characterized by public deliberative institutions In 2004 there were over 400 000 village level meetings that contained deliberative elements For example a township in Wenling City used deliberative polling to create a representative body of citizens who were given the authority to select which municipal projects received funding and resources These new policies He suggests represent the beginnings of an empowered deliberation Political Implications Even if one grants that there is widespread deliberation in authoritarian China what are the political implications of that deliberation He argues that there two possibilities First deliberation might pacify the citizenry by creating a false sense of participation and legitimacy Second these deliberative institutions and activities might serve as vehicles for reform and democratization According to He the second path should be taken seriously Authoritarian deliberation is unstable serving as a kind of Trojan Horse for future democratization Among various mechanisms for democratization He highlighted how deliberation pressures the government to be open with information After all it is difficult to have an explicit policy of limiting the availability of information while adopting the public policy that citizens should be able to provide input on issues of political import Second legitimate deliberation appears to imply greater inclusion Once we grant the opinions of the people are important in a deliberative sense then there is pressure to include the opinions of those who will be affected In fact there have already been cases where Chinese citizens have rejected deliberative institutions that fail that critera He describes a case where taxi drivers in Beijing refused to accept a decision concerning fees until representatives from their community were included in the deliberation Finally deliberative

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/the-buzz/for-baogang-he-influence-of-authoritative-deliberation-in-china-is-underestimated (2014-09-22)
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  • Duflo reveals how hope can help break poverty trap | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    therefore to fall into a poverty trap In addition Duflo explains poverty is correlated with factors that can interfere with rational decision making capacities such as depression and worry And there is some evidence that stressful conditions such as those associated with poverty lead to an increase in cortisol production which in turn leads to a reduced capacity for rational decision making So even those among the poor who genuinely have opportunities to improve their conditions may face psychological barriers to taking advantage of those opportunities that are ultimately caused by features of their present conditions Specifically their capacity to focus on opportunities to improve their conditions and on the reasons for hope provided by these opportunities may be undermined by the fact that their present conditions are so bad This is another reason why the very poor may find themselves caught in an apparently inescapable poverty trap A final reason why the poor may fail to take steps that would increase their chances of escaping poverty according to Duflo is that they tend to spend less time thinking about the future than those whose prospects are generally brighter In other words because the poor face extremely difficult conditions that are unlikely to significantly improve they may simply avoid reflecting on the ways that they can protect themselves from particularly serious dangers and thereby leave themselves more vulnerable than they might have been This may be a way to avoid the depression and worry that often accompanies severe poverty but it also reduces the likelihood of taking steps to increase the odds of escaping poverty that might be available Despite the substantial economic and psychological obstacles facing the very poor there is evidence according to Duflo that even rather minimal improvements in their circumstances can significantly increase the likelihood of breaking the poverty trap For example when an organization in West Bengal provided very poor people with a single asset e g a cow or a sewing machine along with a living stipend and regular guidance and training for a few weeks an increase in consumption that exceeded the value of the asset was sustained over time and the beneficiaries increased their overall income in ways that were not entirely traceable to the assets they initially received Because the poor face extremely difficult conditions that are unlikely to significantly improve they may simply avoid reflecting on the ways that they can protect themselves from particularly serious dangers and thereby leave themselves more vulnerable than they might have been Duflo suggests that these results support the view that hope functions as a capability that allows people to reach their potential On this view the poverty trap that so many of the poor seem to be stuck in is explained at least in large part by the sense of hopelessness that they feel due to their circumstances If this is correct it suggests that policies that provide grounds for hope about the future may be able to help many overcome the poverty

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/the-buzz/duflo-reveals-how-hope-can-help-break-poverty-trap (2014-09-22)
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  • Stanford humanities course empowers recovering addicts and alcoholics | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    turn enable them to better their own lives Satz whose research centers on political philosophy sees a humanities education as an equalizing force between citizens of different economic classes As Satz describes it on the Hope House Scholars webpage a liberal education is to learn about freedom the democratic birthright of all Americans After eight years overseeing Stanford s relationship with Hope House Joan Berry associate director of Stanford s Center for Ethics in Society feels that what makes this program work is that everyone the faculty the Stanford students and the Hope House clients benefits from the sharing of ideas and discussing life s big questions Time after time Berry said it is clear that at end of the class everyone leaves feeling empowered and transformed Reich the director of Stanford s Program in Ethics in Society which organizes the Hope House Scholars Program in conjunction with Stanford Continuing Studies said because the humanities revolve around questions every human being grapples with study of humanities subjects creates a sense of possibility and agency that many of the Hope House students haven t experienced in a long time Finding a voice Indeed many of the women who completed the most recent course referenced a sense of accomplishment that renewed their self confidence This spring a course team taught by Stanford Humanities Center Associate Director Katja Zelljadt and Mira Wasserman a scholar of Jewish studies and a resident fellow in a Stanford undergraduate residence hall centered on an iconic work of feminist art called The Dinner Party Created by artist Judy Chicago and on permanent display at the Brooklyn Museum the installation features 39 unique place settings representing important women from history The students wrote poems plays essays and political speeches in which they found connections between their own personal stories and those of the historical figures Ellen D a lawyer and an alcoholic whose binge drinking landed her in jail described writing assignments such as a play that showed how Emily Dickinson and Sojourner Truth might have interacted as cathartic The experience she said helped to counteract the powerlessness and shame of addiction For the first time in a long time I did something I was proud of she added A historian by training Zelljadt said she and Wasserman wanted to get the women thinking about layering in history and how different generations of women rediscover women The Hope House students she added are just the newest generation of those re discoverers At the course completion celebration Wasserman told the students that the coursework had stretched the students to express themselves but they had raised themselves to every challenge She said she hoped the course had persuaded the women that they have important things to say and the ability to express themselves Each graduate receives a credit toward a Continuing Studies course and Jesse R a young mother who is trying to beat her drug addiction so she can regain custody of her infant said she plans to take a

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/the-buzz/stanford-humanities-course-empowers-recovering-addicts-and-alcoholics (2014-09-22)
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  • Sins in a world where money is the ultimate good | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    part of the Ethics of Wealth series sponsored by the McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society which also helped organize a pre concert panel discussion about the issues of wealth raised in Weill s work The concert was presented in partnernship with Stanford Live and Music at Stanford Guest soprano Ute Gfrerer an Austrian born performer and the world s leading interpreter of Weill s work sang the parts of both Anna 1 and Anna 2 Also on stage was an all male quartet singing the part of the family back in Louisiana As the Annas sweep their way across the country the family interjects with updates about the amount of money they re sending home They berate Anna 2 for the sins she has committed and they often repeat the line O Lord look down upon our daughter show her the way that leads the good to Thy reward the reward being of course money rather than a path to heaven Throughout their journey Anna 1 is in control and describes Anna 2 s sins that keep them from their holy reward Anna 2 is a beautiful dancer and Anna 1 encourages her to use her looks and talents to make money However Anna 2 displays pride when she says she wants to perform as an artist rather than as a night dancer in a cabaret Her lust involves falling in love with a man named Fernando who is poor rather than staying dedicated to Edward her wealthy man in Boston and a good provider And Anna 2 s gluttony is eating like a normal person rather than sticking to a strict dancer s diet so she can stay slim and seduce more wealthy men Right Anna Eventually despite Anna 2 s sins the sisters make enough money and return to Louisiana Weill s concert piece ends on an unsettling note Anna 1 says they have made a fortune but the result is still just a little home in old Louisiana The sisters return to their small town on the Mississippi River Anna 2 with a broken heart feeling so tired All she can say when Anna 1 sums up their accomplishment is what she has said throughout their journey Right Anna As she sang the two Anna s lines Gfrerer indicated with her slumped body language Anna 2 s sadness and defeat In her interpretation of Weill s work the audience should see the unhappiness and anxiety these seven years of chasing wealth has caused Anna 2 Though the Annas may have made a fortune their reward seems joyless They haven t found true fulfillment in their pursuit of material wealth A concert dedicated to Kurt Weill Saturday evening s concert was completely dedicated to Kurt Weill which conductor Anna Wittstruck was well positioned to lead since her dissertation includes a chapter on Kurt Weill and The Seven Deadly Sins which premiered in Paris in 1933 Mozart was Weill s favorite composer so the Stanford Philharmonia Orchestra

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/the-buzz/sins-in-a-world-where-money-is-the-ultimate-good (2014-09-22)
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  • Stanford panel debates: Does teaching ethics do any good? | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    Salil Dudani on May 13 2014 Stanford University requires every undergraduate to take a class that deals with ethics But can something as personal as ethics be taught in a classroom Can classes in ethics make students more virtuous individuals Or is that the wrong question to focus on These are the issues that a panel of Stanford scholars addressed in an event titled Does Teaching Ethics do any Good It was sponsored by the McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society as part of a series of talks marking its 25th anniversary Approaching the topic from diverse academic backgrounds the Stanford professors who participated in the discussion agreed that ethics classes cannot be expected to make students more ethical However they articulated several other benefits such as teaching students to fruitfully and confidently engage in ethical dialogue They also argued that studying ethics can make students less dogmatic and more tolerant and yet at the same time more clear about their own value commitments Professor Benoît Monin of the Graduate School of Business philosophy Professor Tamar Schapiro and law Professor Barbara Fried spoke at the event which was held at the Law School on May 1 A video of the talk is available online Read the rest of Salil Dudani s article here This article was originally published on May 13 2014 on the Stanford News site and featured in the daily Stanford Report newsletter For more information about the event see the past event page To see photos from the panel discussion check out the Flickr album The Buzz is the McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society s student driven news portal We review events and speakers and we feature initiatives that are of broad interest Undergraduate Stanford students write the articles and the Center for Ethics

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/the-buzz/stanford-panel-debates-does-teaching-ethics-do-any-good (2014-09-22)
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  • Chrystia Freeland: Interview with The Buzz | Stanford Center for Ethics in Society
    and stayed in touch And really to my great surprise last June he invited me to come home and to run So I ran our equivalent of a primary ran for the nomination and I won And there was then a by election and I ran for that and I won too so now I m a member of Parliament The Buzz Congratulations CF Thank you The Buzz Let s turn to your book Plutocrats The Rise of the New Global Super Rich and the Fall of Everyone Else and we ll start super basic What does the modern plutocracy look like CF The starting point for my book is the fact that things have really changed I think our set of expectations and intuitive beliefs around the economy around society around politics are very much still rooted in the experience of the post war era And that was a period when there was strong economic growth across the Western industrialized economies and declining income inequality It turns out that that period was the exception rather than the rule So that period which we still in the back of our minds see as normal has stopped being the case It started to change in the late 70s And today we are now back at an income distribution and an income inequality which we haven t seen since the Gilded Age That s a big shift Something different has happened That was my starting point And then even within the conversation about income inequality there tends to be a focus on the bottom The reality is a great deal of the change is happening at the very top That s where we ve seen a real shift both in income and in wealth and I felt people weren t focusing on that The second thing I felt people really weren t focusing on was the extent to which this was global I felt that insofar as there was a discussion of this stuff it tended to be very nationally focused and missed the connections that were happening between the super rich around the world The Buzz The Center for Ethics has been focused on the ethics of wealth for the past two years It seems like when we talk about plutocrats there s an implication of greed or self interest and we non plutocrats are passing judgment on the plutocrats Do you feel like it s possible to have a good plutocrat or a good plutocracy or is that an oxymoron CF Well I think those are two different questions Whether it s possible to have a good plutocracy and a good plutocrat are really different I think it s definitely possible to have a good plutocrat There are a lot of people who have earned great fortunes who are tremendous people And they are using their fortunes and the skills and energy it took to accumulate those fortunes to do really tremendous things in the world I think the danger

    Original URL path: https://ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu/the-buzz/chrystia-freeland-interview-with-the-buzz (2014-09-22)
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