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  • Arts Supplement | Department of Art & Art History
    3404 Arts Supplement Submission Requirements Painting Drawing and Printmaking Submit ten slides in any of the following still life figure landscape portrait self portrait deliberate abstraction Drawings and paintings may be submitted as one Arts Supplement not to exceed 10 images Sculpture Submit ten images of three dimensional works in any or all of the following mixed media wood metal clay installation or found objects We offer neither ceramics courses nor facilities and do not accept ceramics supplements that are not sculpture based Photography Submit ten images Video Art Digital Media and Electronic Arts Submit no more than three video segments totaling no more than ten minutes If your work is a website please do NOT submit the link or HTML code Instead make a video that demonstrates the operation of the site You may also submit slides for this category if your work is through digital media and you feel it could not be captured through video Frequently Asked Questions Q Can I submit actual photos paintings art materials or CDs DVDs for consideration A No you may not mail any physical items or works of art for consideration All submissions must be made online via the Stanford Slideroom webpage Visit admission stanford edu arts for detailed instructions Q Do I have to be an art major if I submit an Arts Supplement A No submitting an Arts Supplement does not require or admit you to the Art Practice program The Arts Supplement is intended for any student with an extraordinary talent and passion for art regardless of their intended major Once you arrive at Stanford we welcome students of any major to enroll in art courses Q Can I submit more than ten images A No if you submit more than ten images the Arts Supplement will not

    Original URL path: https://art.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-program/arts-supplement (2015-06-02)
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  • Peer Adviser Program | Department of Art & Art History
    the undergraduate coordinator to plan events for their fellow peers In addition to scheduling events and workshops that promote greater interaction amongst students of the department the Peer Advisers also answer questions from prospective students Peer Advisers 2014 15 EMMA COLLINS Class of 2016 Peer Adviser Art History Hello My name is Emma Collins and I m a junior double majoring in art history and economics at Stanford Outside of school I have held internship positions at Artsy Fidelity Investments and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum One big goal for me as peer adviser is to create more awareness about the amazing internship opportunities available in the arts I am so excited to be the art history peer adviser and I really hope that current and prospective students feel like they can come and talk to me for any reason Please come to my office hours or email me if you want to chat about classes internships sports the East Coast or anything else Office Hours T 4 15 5 15pm Email emma16 stanford edu Althea Solis Class of 2015 Peer Advisor Art Practice Hi my name is Althea and I m a multimedia art making fool I m currently majoring in Art Practice with an official minor in Creative Writing and an almost minor in Almost Everything My focus is work that challenges and explores personal and collective narratives ideology and the improbable miracle of existence Currently I m working on an Interdisciplinary Honors in the Arts project a graphic novel about Mars colonization the desperate fear for survival a need to find a home somewhere in the universe and fear of the future My work has been featured in Leland Quarterly multiple SOCA Student Organizing Committee of the Arts shows and Office Hours M 3 00 5 00pm

    Original URL path: https://art.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-programs/peer-adviser-program (2015-06-02)
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  • Current Courses | Department of Art & Art History
    10 30am 12 30pm Art103 FILMSTUD 300C section 2 History of World Cinema III 1960 Present FILMSTUD 100C Jean Ma 2014 2015 Spring Thursday 3 30pm 4 30pm FILMSTUD 300C section 1 History of World Cinema III 1960 Present FILMSTUD 100C 2014 2015 Spring Tuesday Thursday 12 35pm 2 05pm Annaud Screening Tuesday 7 00pm 9 30pm FILMSTUD 100C section 3 History of World Cinema III 1960 Present FILMSTUD 300C Jean Ma 2014 2015 Spring Friday 12 00pm 1 00pm 200 219 Screening Tuesdays 7 00pm 9 30pm FILMSTUD 100C section 1 History of World Cinema III 1960 Present FILMSTUD 300C 2014 2015 Spring Tuesday Thursday 12 35pm 2 05pm Annaud FILMSTUD 100C section 2 History of World Cinema III 1960 Present FILMSTUD 300C 2014 2015 Spring Thursday 4 15pm 5 05pm School of Education 208 FILMSTUD 442 section 1 Hollywood Musical Scott Bukatman 2014 2015 Spring Thursday 1 15pm 4 05pm Art103 Screening Wednesdays 7 00pm 9 30pm ARTHIST 409 section 1 Iconoclasm ARTHIST 209C CLASSICS 158 CLASSICS 258 REES 409 Bissera Pentcheva 2014 2015 Spring Tuesday 2 15pm 5 05pm ARTHIST 209C section 1 Iconoclasm ARTHIST 409 CLASSICS 158 CLASSICS 258 REES 409 2014 2015 Spring Tuesday 2 15pm 5 05pm FILMPROD 106 section 1 Image and Sound Filmmaking for the Digital Age 2014 2015 Spring Friday 1 15pm 4 05pm ARTSTUDI 130 section 1 Interactive Art Making it with Arduino Paul DeMarinis 2014 2015 Spring Monday Wednesday 10 00am 11 50am Cummings Art 204 ARTSTUDI 275 section 1 Introduction to Digital Photography and Visual Images Robert Dawson 2014 2015 Spring Tuesday Thursday 3 15pm 5 05pm ARTGAL7 FILMPROD 114 section 1 Introduction to Film and Video Production Laura Green 2014 2015 Spring Monday Wednesday 2 15pm 4 05pm 120 S64 ARTSTUDI 170 section 1 Introduction to Photography Lukas Felzmann 2014 2015 Spring Monday Wednesday 10 00am 11 50am ARTGAL7 ARTSTUDI 170 section 2 Introduction to Photography Robert Dawson 2014 2015 Spring Tuesday Thursday 1 15pm 3 05pm ARTGAL7 ARTHIST 3 section 2 Introduction to World Architecture CLASSICS 54 Fabio Barry 2014 2015 Spring ARTHIST 3 section 3 Introduction to World Architecture CLASSICS 54 2014 2015 Spring ARTHIST 3 section 1 Introduction to World Architecture CLASSICS 54 2014 2015 Spring Monday Wednesday Friday 11 00am 11 50am Herrin T175 ARTSTUDI 254 section 1 Kinetic Sculpture Terry Berlier 2014 2015 Spring Tuesday Thursday 1 15pm 3 05pm Art6 ARTSTUDI 148A Lithography ARTSTUDI 342C section 4 M F A Seminar 2014 2015 Autumn ARTSTUDI 342C section 1 M F A Seminar 2014 2015 Spring Wednesday 5 30pm 7 30pm ARTHIST 105B section 2 Medieval Journeys Introduction through the Art and Architecture DLCL 123 Bissera Pentcheva 2014 2015 Spring Friday 2 00pm 3 00pm 200 217 ARTHIST 105B section 1 Medieval Journeys Introduction through the Art and Architecture DLCL 123 2014 2015 Spring Tuesday Thursday 12 35pm 2 05pm Art2 ARTHIST 472 section 1 Mellon Curating Course Richard Meyer Connie Wolf 2014 2015 Spring Monday 2 15pm 5 05pm ARTSTUDI 361

    Original URL path: https://art.stanford.edu/courses?order=title&sort=asc (2015-06-02)
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  • Introduction to World Architecture (CLASSICS 54) | Department of Art & Art History
    Exhibition Spaces Stanford Art Gallery SubGallery Cummings Lobby Gallery Annenberg Corridor Other Exhibition Spaces Open Studios New Venues in 2015 Introduction to World Architecture CLASSICS 54 ARTHIST 3 This lecture course surveys the history of architecture and urbanism from the first societies to the present in Europe West and East Asia the Americas and Africa The course progresses by case studies of exemplary monuments and cities and examines the built environment as both cultural artifact and architectural event It considers the social and political circumstances of architectural invention as well as plumbing the depth of artistic context by which particular formal choices resonate with an established representational culture View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses Section Information Title Instructor Quarter Day Time Location ARTHIST 3 section 1 Introduction to World Architecture CLASSICS 54 2014 2015 Spring Monday Wednesday Friday 11 00am 11 50am Herrin T175 ARTHIST 3 section 2 Introduction to World Architecture CLASSICS 54 Fabio Barry 2014 2015 Spring ARTHIST 3 section 3 Introduction to World Architecture CLASSICS 54 2014 2015 Spring About Department Overview People Works Contact Website Feedback Programs Art History Art Practice Design Documentary Film Film and Media Studies News and Events Department Newsletter Recent

    Original URL path: https://art.stanford.edu/courses/2014-2015-arthist-3 (2015-06-02)
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  • The Portrait: Identities in Question | Department of Art & Art History
    and techniques encounters with expert portraitists or photographers and established settings for display What almost all portraits of whatever time or cultural place have in common are presentations of social identities roles or persona as well as a potential fascination and power that may be based in our neurological capacities for facial recognition and mind reading through facial expressions n This introductory seminar will explore many aspects of this basically simple category of thing images of particular persons Our point of departure will be from the history of art focusing on portrait sculptures paintings and photographs from many eras and cultures some of which are among the most studied and discussed of all artistic monuments We will consider techniques and approaches of portrait making including the conventions that underlie seemingly realistic portraits posing the portrait situation and portrait genres Our primary focus will be on the multiple purposes of portraiture from commemoration political glorification and self fashioning to making claims of social status cultural role and personal identity We will also discuss the changing status of portraiture under modern states of social dislocation technological change and psychoanalytic interrogation and in postmodern conditions of multi mediated realities and distributed subjectivities Along

    Original URL path: https://art.stanford.edu/courses/2014-2015-arthist-80n (2015-06-02)
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  • The Artist in Ancient Greek Society (CLASSICS 18N) | Department of Art & Art History
    the work of craftsmen but not the men themselves Why did Herodotus dismiss those who worked with their hands as mechanics What prompted Homer to claim that there is no greater glory for a man than what he achieves with his own hands provided that he was throwing a discus and not a vase on a wheel n nPainted pottery was essential to the religious and secular lives of the Greeks Libations to the gods and to the dead required vases from which to pour them Economic prosperity depended on the export of wine and oil in durable clay containers At home depictions of gods and heroes on vases reinforced Greek values and helped parents to educate their children Ceramic sets with scenes of Dionysian excess were reserved for elite symposia from which those who potted and painted them were excluded n nSculptors were less lowly but even those who carved the Parthenon were still regarded as mechanics with soft bodies and soft minds Xenophon indifferent to higher things Plutarch n nThe seminar addresses these issues Students will read and discuss texts write response papers and present slide lectures and gallery talks on aspects of the artist s profession View

    Original URL path: https://art.stanford.edu/courses/2014-2015-arthist-100n (2015-06-02)
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  • Medieval Journeys: Introduction through the Art and Architecture (DLCL 123) | Department of Art & Art History
    a foundations class this survey of medieval culture engages in particular the art and architecture of the period The Middle Ages is presented as a network of global economies fueled by a desire for natural resources access to luxury goods and holy sites We will study a large geographical area encompassing the British Isles Europe the Mediterranean Central Asia India and East Africa and trace the connectivity of these lands in economic political religious and artistic terms from the fourth to the fourteenth century C E The students will have two lectures and one discussion session per week Depending on the size of the class it is possible that a graduate student TA will run the discussion session Our goal is to give a skills oriented approach to the Middle Ages and to engage students in creative projects that will satisfy 1 Ways Creative Expression requirement as well as one of the following two Ways Analytical Interpretive or Ways Engaging Difference View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses Section Information Title Instructor Quarter Day Time Location ARTHIST 105B section 1 Medieval Journeys Introduction through the Art and Architecture DLCL 123 2014 2015 Spring Tuesday Thursday 12 35pm 2 05pm

    Original URL path: https://art.stanford.edu/courses/2014-2015-arthist-105b (2015-06-02)
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  • Pagan Mythology and the Making of Modern Europe | Department of Art & Art History
    the seventeenth century European artists turned to the legends and poetry of Greco Roman paganism for pictorial subjects What roles could Venus and Mars Mercury and Minerva play in a Christian culture Artists and humanists had different answers to this question As relics from the past the stories of the ancient gods could serve as the prehistory of worldly and religious institutions and hence legitimize them Or pagan myth because of its alien nature could convey fantasies of the body which could not be articulated otherwise Among the artists who explored creatively the ancient legends were Donatello Botticelli Michelangelo Raphael Velazquez Rubens Rembrandt Bernini and Poussin Next to ancient authors such as Homer and Ovid we shall be reading excerpts from the humanists Dante Boccaccio Petrarch and Vasari as we explore word image relationships The seminar includes excursions to the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University to look at Old Master prints from the museum s storage not normally on display and we shall study paintings and sculptures with mythological subjects in the Legion of Honor the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco View this course and available sections on ExploreCourses Section Information Title Instructor Quarter Day Time Location ARTHIST

    Original URL path: https://art.stanford.edu/courses/2014-2015-arthist-118n (2015-06-02)
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