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  • Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials
    members from the departments of Applied Physics Chemistry Electrical Engineering Materials Science and Engineering and Physics GLAM is located in the McCullough Building on the Stanford main campus which it shares with its partner in research the Stanford Institute for Materials Energy Sciences SIMES Home Polymer fullerene bulk heterojunction thin film used for organic solar cells in the McGehee group News and Upcoming Events Nine Stanford faculty members elected to

    Original URL path: https://glam.stanford.edu/ (2015-07-06)
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  • Research | Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials
    to room temperature Salleo Group GLAM supports the research activities of more than 30 faculty members from the departments of Applied Physics Chemistry Electrical Engineering Materials Science and Engineering and Physics Summaries of our faculty members research are grouped by research categories Emergent Properties of Quantum Materials Materials Synthesis and Processing Materials for Energy Production and Storage Synthesis and Properties of Nano materials Interaction of Light and Matter Biomaterials GLAM is also home to the following Research Centers Bay Area Photovoltaic Consortium BAPVC The Bay Area Photovoltaic Consortium is a unique partnership joining universities industry and the US Government with the mission of developing advanced technologies to deliver high performance photovoltaic modules at low cost Center for Advanced Molecular Photovoltaics CAMP The Center for Advanced Molecular Photovoltaics is a research center which aims to revolutionize the global energy landscape by developing the science and technology for stable efficient molecular photovoltaic cells that can compete with fossil fuels in cost per kilowatt hour produced Center for Probing the Nanoscale CPN The Center for Probing the Nanoscale has the goals of developing novel probes that dramatically improve our capability to observe manipulate and control nanoscale objects and phenomena educating the next generation

    Original URL path: https://glam.stanford.edu/research (2015-07-06)
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  • People | Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials
    Facilities Contact Us Fellowships People Faculty Scientific Staff Administrative Staff Students and Postdocs People Faculty Scientific Staff Administrative Staff Students and Postdocs Contact Us Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials 476 Lomita Mall Stanford CA 94305 Map Staff Log in For

    Original URL path: https://glam.stanford.edu/people (2015-07-06)
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  • Calendar | Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials
    Thursday Apr 2 2015 3 15pm McCullough 115 Abhay Pasupathy Steven Kivelson Short Stories on Fermi Surface Nesting Columbia University Abstract Thursday Mar 12 2015 3 15pm McCullough 115 Taylor L Hughes Xiao Liang Qi Interplay between Symmetry and Geometry in Topological Phases University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Abstract Thursday Feb 26 2015 3 15pm McCullough 115 Yoram Dagan Harold Hwang 2D to 1D Oxide interfaces superconductivity magnetism and ballistic transport effects University of Tel Aviv Abstract Thursday Feb 19 2015 3 15pm McCullough 115 Gregory S Boebinger David Goldhaber Gordon The Phase Diagram of the Cuprate Superconductors A Survey of Magnetotransport and Specific Heat Measurements National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Abstract Thursday Feb 12 2015 3 15pm McCullough 115 Michael Flatté Yuri Suzuki Room temperature electronic spin correlations towards spin coherent technologies University of Iowa Abstract Thursday Feb 5 2015 3 15pm McCullough 115 Benjamin Lev Benjamin Lev The SQCRAMscope Probing exotic materials with quantum gases Stanford University Abstract Thursday Jan 29 2015 3 15pm McCullough 115 Brad Ramshaw David Goldhaber Gordon Ultrasound as a symmetry probe of quantum materials Los Alamos National Laboratory Abstract Thursday Jan 22 2015 3 15pm McCullough 115 Alexander Sushkov David Goldhaber Gordon Magnetic Resonance with Single Nuclear Spin Sensitivity Harvard University Abstract Thursday Jan 15 2015 3 15pm McCullough 115 Jason Petta David Goldhaber Gordon Few Atom Masers Princeton University Abstract Thursday Jan 8 2015 3 15pm McCullough 115 Young Lee Young Lee Frustration and its benefits flat bands and topological magnons Stanford University and SLAC Abstract Thursday Nov 20 2014 3 15pm McCullough 115 Emanuel Gull Richard Martin Spectroscopic aspects and pairing glue of superconductivity in the 2D Hubbard model University of Michigan Abstract Thursday Nov 13 2014 3 15pm McCullough 115 Gil Refael Xiao Liang Qi Light matters from Floquet

    Original URL path: https://glam.stanford.edu/calendar (2015-07-06)
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  • Shared Facilities | Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials
    Stanford Nano Center in the Spilker Building SNC Website For lab access information at these facilities please visit http snc stanford edu about join html Equipment at SNL includes Focused Ion Beam FIB SEM Laboratories DB235 FIB SEM Helios FIB SEM Transmission Electron Microscope TEM Facilities Tecnai TEM Titan ETEM TEM Specimen Preparation Laboratory Scanning Electron Microscope SEM Laboratories Sirion SEM Magellan SEM Electron Microprobe Analysis EMPA Laboratory Scanning Auger

    Original URL path: https://glam.stanford.edu/shared-facilities (2015-07-06)
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  • Contact Us | Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials
    View Parking Structure 2 to McCullough Building in a larger map At GLAM Ian Fisher Director Mark Brongersma Deputy Director Cynthia Sanchez Associate Director Larry Candido Facilities and Safety Manager Mark Gibson Laboratory Services Coordinator In the event of a fire or health threatening hazardous material releases call 9 911 For releases or incidents not immediately health threatening call 650 725 9999 5 9999 from a campus phone For maintenance

    Original URL path: https://glam.stanford.edu/contact-us (2015-07-06)
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  • GLAM Fellowships | Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials
    funds to cover research and or travel expenses Candidates are asked to submit online a curriculum vitae including publication list and a two page research statement that details proposed research and possible collaborations within GLAM Candidates are also required to identify one or more host faculty within GLAM with whom they have discussed their proposed research and who will be asked to submit a nomination letter on their behalf Candidates should also arrange to have two letters of reference submitted online For administrative queries please contact C Sanchez glamfellowships stanford edu See below for more details application schedule and list of frequently asked questions Competition Schedule 2016 2018 July 1 2015 Application period begins 12 00 noon Pacific Standard Time PST October 30 2015 Application deadline Candidates are responsible for making sure that all components of their application are submitted before the deadline including letters of recommendation November 2015 Committee reviews applications Early December 2015 Offers made to successful candidates Fellowship alternates also informed All other candidates notified January 15 2016 Decision deadline for Fellowship offers Required Application Materials Applicants are responsible for ensuring that all of the following items are submitted online by 12 00 noon PST on October 30 2015 Name Current position Current Institution Bachelors Degree subject institution graduation date If applicable PhD thesis title institution department thesis advisor graduation date Name and email of proposed faculty host in GLAM Letter from proposed faculty host in GLAM to be submitted by GLAM faculty Optional Name of proposed co host at GLAM Letter CV including publication list Research statement 2 pages can include figures and references but doesn t have to please use a font size such that the document is readable see FAQ Names Institutions and Email address of 2 referees 2 letters of recommendation to be

    Original URL path: https://glam.stanford.edu/glam-fellowships (2015-07-06)
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  • Emergent Properties of Quantum Materials | Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials
    and high resolution mageneto optics Michael Kelly Dr Kelly is a consulting Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford He has over 30 years experience in developing sensors and spectroscopic instruments used to study a wide variety of organic and inorganic surface phenomena He has published widely and holds numerous patents in the fields of electron optics thin film synthesis and electron spectrometers He will participate in the CCNE TR program by assisting in the development of biosensors and by evaluating their performance using X ray photoelectron spectroscopy secondary ion mass spectrometry and other surface sensitive techniques Steven Kivelson I am interested in the qualitative understanding of the macroscopic and collective properties of condensed matter systems and on the relation between this and the microscopic physics at the single electron or single molecule scale I have been particularly interested in exploring the spectacular consequences of strong correlation effects in electronic materials and devices where the low energy properties are qualitatively different from those of a non interacting electron gas This field of study has been made particularly rich and exciting by the seemingly nonending sequence of unexpected experimental discoveries that have occurred in this field over the past couple of decades discoveries which undermine accepted beliefs and raise conceptually deep questions concerning the emergent behavior of systems with many strongly interacting degrees of freedom Robert Laughlin As our experimental understanding of nature has matured we have come to realize just how artificial the distinction is between fundamental physical law something that just is and other kinds of physical law that emerge through self organization Everyday examples of the latter include material rigidity magnetism and super fluidity but there are countless others Things become more troubling however when we realize that the vacuum of space time also has symptoms of being emergent Fundamental quantities such as the electron charge defocus and change value as you examine the vacuum at smaller and smaller length scales Unification of forces becomes mathematically indistinguishable from quantum phase transitions of the vacuum Heats of formation and other collective effects in the vacuum become implicated in inflationary theories of the universe We are increasingly realizing that finding law a quantitative relationship among measured quantities that is always true is not eh same thing as finding fundamental truth Indeed when you measure only at low energies you simply cannot tell the difference between a law that emerges and a law that just is Young Lee The Lee group s research involves studies of novel electronic and magnetic materials in single crystalline form The goal is to understand the properties of correlated electron systems and quantum spin systems with an eye toward discovering new materials or new physical phenomena Such materials represent a major challenge to our present understanding of condensed matter physics as they consist of many quantum particles which strongly interact with each other The delicate interplay between the constituents of these systems involving the magnetic charge orbital and lattice degrees of freedom

    Original URL path: https://glam.stanford.edu/people/faculty/emergent-properties-quantum-materials (2015-07-06)
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