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  • Orysia Kulick | Department of History
    Events Past Events History Related Events People Faculty Courtesy Emeriti Visiting Faculty and Lecturers Graduate Students Staff About the Department Orysia Kulick Orysia Kulick Ph D Candidate Field Eastern Europe Russia and Eurasia M A M P P University of Michigan B A The Ohio State University cv 2015 pdf Contact Email okulick stanford edu About About the Department Degree Programs Undergraduate Program Graduate Programs Courses People Faculty Graduate Students

    Original URL path: https://history.stanford.edu/people/orysia-kulick (2015-10-06)
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  • Gabriel Lee | Department of History
    States roughly 1900 1960 which like the subject itself is a conglomerate of different subtopics business history and the geography of cement markets urban history the history of technology highways and transportation and the history of water management and dams and the avenues through which all of these intersected to establish our modern relationship to concrete making it presently the second most used resource on the planet after water In

    Original URL path: https://history.stanford.edu/people/gabriel-lee (2015-10-06)
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  • Nicholas Levy | Department of History
    A B in History Princeton University 2007 Nicholas focuses primarily on the history of the Soviet Union and the former socialist bloc He is interested in a social history of the Soviet 1970s that could begin to bridge the gap between the reductive narrative of stagnation and the nostalgic emphasis on stability His previous work has dealt with architecture and urban transformation in the late Stalin era as well as

    Original URL path: https://history.stanford.edu/people/nicholas-levy (2015-10-06)
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  • Erin Lichtenstein | Department of History
    Graduate Students Staff About the Department Bookshelf Projects News Events Upcoming Events Past Events History Related Events People Faculty Courtesy Emeriti Visiting Faculty and Lecturers Graduate Students Staff About the Department Erin Lichtenstein Erin Lichtenstein Field Early Modern Europe Contact Email lichte stanford edu About About the Department Degree Programs Undergraduate Program Graduate Programs Courses People Faculty Graduate Students Staff News and Events Recent News Upcoming Events Connect Facebook Twitter

    Original URL path: https://history.stanford.edu/people/erin-lichtenstein (2015-10-06)
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  • Julia Mansfield | Department of History
    Mansfield Doctoral Candidate Field United States A B Harvard College Classical Archaeology 2005 Julia Mansfield studies the history of the United States from a global perspective Her focus is the Early Republic during the Age of Republican Revolutions She is currently writing a dissertation entitled The Disease of Commerce Yellow Fever in the Atlantic World 1793 1828 This work examines a hemorrhagic fever that swept through the West Indies the United States and southern Europe The Disease of Commerce is the first full length account of the pandemic It probes the causes and consequences political diplomatic and scientific of that global event The pandemic overlapped with and shaped the political upheavals that dissolved European empires and gave rise to a new power the United States Julia has received numerous grants to support her work including fellowships from the Consortium for the History of Science Technology and Medicine the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations the School of Humanities Sciences Stanford University and the Vice Provost of Graduate Education Stanford University Contact Email julia mansfield stanford edu Highlights Research Interests The Early Republic of the United States the Age of Revolutions police powers of government the unfinished republican revolution epidemiology

    Original URL path: https://history.stanford.edu/people/julia-mansfield (2015-10-06)
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  • Hannah Marcus | Department of History
    Emeriti Visiting Faculty and Lecturers Graduate Students Staff About the Department Hannah Marcus Hannah Marcus Field Early Modern Europe I am a graduate student studying early modern European history and the history of science I am writing a dissertation called Banned Books Medicine Readers and Censors in Early Modern Italy 1559 1664 which examines the ways that many cutting edge medical texts of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were first prohibited then expurgated and finally permitted to certain readers with licenses Methodologically my research is based on both a traditional study of archival materials primarily housed in the Archive of the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith and a deep analysis of the expurgated books themselves informed by bibliographical techniques I am involved in the Mapping the Republic of Letters project and Humanities Design and I appreciate how the digital humanities have added a macro lens to the close reading of my archival research Selected Publications Projects History Graduate Students Community Memory Project Hannah Marcus The History Graduate Students Community Memory Project or Hist Grad Archive is dedicated to preserving the collective wisdom and experience of the Contact Email hfmarcus stanford edu About About the Department Degree Programs Undergraduate

    Original URL path: https://history.stanford.edu/people/hannah-marcus (2015-10-06)
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  • Natalie Marine-Street | Department of History
    the Making of Consumer Markets in America 1850 1930 Natalie Marine Street is a PhD candidate specializing in the history of business and gender in the United States Her dissertation explores the origins and evolution of the agency model of doing business with a special focus on women s involvement More Information Areas of Teaching Ability 19th and 20th century United States Women and gender Work workers and the workplace

    Original URL path: https://history.stanford.edu/people/natalie-marine-street (2015-10-06)
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  • Lindsey Martin | Department of History
    City Moscow under Catherine the Great 1762 1796 explores how Catherine and a cohort of high ranking officials attempted to radically transform Moscow through policing the city Eighteenth century rulers strove to remake Russia according to their ideas of enlightenment and modernity Moscow the country s largest city and traditional capital served as a particular focus of reform According to contemporary elites the city s haphazard planning superstitious populace and decentralized administration represented the antithesis of a well ordered European metropolis Efforts to remedy these shortcomings culminated during the time of Catherine the Great who introduced a series of reforms to Europeanize the city Scholars have left contemporaneous assessments of Moscow largely unchallenged concluding that reforms brought much needed changes to a city mired in dysfunction and fundamentally backward in comparison to the West My project counters these assumptions by focusing on the Moscow Police the institution charged with rooting out behaviors and practices deemed contrary to enlightened good order Policing I argue supplanted functioning administrative structures and social relationships and imposed alternatives drawn eclectically from Western Europe that would be much more transparent and responsive to central authorities The language of disorder and Europeanization thus belies how Russian rulers

    Original URL path: https://history.stanford.edu/people/lindsey-martin (2015-10-06)
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