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  • ILO Expertise and Colonial Violence in the Interwar Years | Department of History
    Palgrave 2013 In 1925 the Temporary Slavery Commission of the League of Nations was in the midst of investigating how best to end global slavery when a troubling report was submitted for its consideration Unlike most reports received by the commission that described the existence of slavery primarily in autonomous non European countries such as China and Abyssinia this one documented rampant abuses in Portuguese Angola and Mozambique that is in territories directly under European control The report was submitted to the League by a group of distinguished philanthropists and was written by Edward A Ross one of the most prominent American socio logists of his day The report based on thousands of interviews with residents in both colonies described how Portuguese officials and white settlers regularly beat raped and even killed Africans with impunity At the core of this abuse Ross argued was a forced labour system in many ways worse than slavery In sixty pages of examples Ross described cases of Africans being forced to work in desperate conditions for months and sometimes years without pay No one was exempt not the elderly pregnant women or children as young as twelve The consequences were predictable unable to work

    Original URL path: https://history.stanford.edu/publications/ilo-expertise-and-colonial-violence-interwar-years (2015-10-06)
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  • Placing French Missionaries in the Modern World | Department of History
    introductory chapter assesses the way in which religious missionaries have been dealt with and often ignored in the historiography of modern French colonialism Missionaries defy many of the categories commonly used to study the history of empires Religious workers complicate concepts like modernity nationalism and even empire since they regularly portrayed themselves as inheritors of a biblical tradition of evangelizing across national and imperial borders for the greater glory of

    Original URL path: https://history.stanford.edu/publications/placing-french-missionaries-modern-world (2015-10-06)
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  • Behind the Imperial Curtain: International Humanitarian Efforts and the Critique of French Colonialism in the Interwar Years | Department of History
    Years J P Daughton French Historical Studies 34 3 Jul 2011 Behind the Imperial Curtain International Humanitarian Efforts and the Critique of French Colonialism in the Interwar Years Special Issue Toward a French History of Universal Values Charity Human Rights and Humanitarianism French Historical Studies 34 3 Summer 2011 503 528 This article examines the work of French critics of empire in the context of an international effort to minimize violence and suffering in Europe s colonies during the interwar years Rather than highlight individual political motivations the article considers the important similarities of these critics works Often writing in the style of documentary reportage and concerned with how policies caused suffering among non European populations authors as varied as Albert Londres Félicien Challaye and Paul Monet produced articles and books that critiqued colonial practices at their most fundamental level They shared an interest in the impact of colonial rule with other European American and non European individuals and institutions informally linked by the networks of the League of Nations and the International Labor Organization The existence of these new networks removed key debates about colonialism from the national stage and opened them to the scrutiny of more international and

    Original URL path: https://history.stanford.edu/publications/behind-imperial-curtain-international-humanitarian-efforts-and-critique-french (2015-10-06)
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  • When Argentina Was ‘French’: Rethinking Cultural Politics and European Imperialism in Belle-Époque Buenos Aires | Department of History
    French Rethinking Cultural Politics and European Imperialism in Belle Époque Buenos Aires J P Daughton Journal of Modern History 80 Dec 2008 Behind the Imperial Curtain International Humanitarian Efforts and the Critique of French Colonialism in the Interwar Years Special Issue Toward a French History of Universal Values Charity Human Rights and Humanitarianism French Historical Studies 34 3 Summer 2011 503 528 JSTOR About About the Department Degree Programs Undergraduate

    Original URL path: https://history.stanford.edu/publications/when-argentina-was-%E2%80%98french%E2%80%99-rethinking-cultural-politics-and-european-imperialism-belle (2015-10-06)
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  • Stanford historian uncovers the dark roots of humanitarianism | Department of History
    terrain Stanford historian JP Daughton says that what was intended as a project to lift people out of poverty cost the lives of tens of thousands of indigenous laborers and dislocated communities Archives nationales d outre mer Apr 23 2015 Stanford Report Through a study of the history of the French colonial Congo Océan Railway Stanford historian JP Daughton has discovered how modern humanitarianism arose from the brutality of European colonialism By Samuel Huneke Modern humanitarian endeavors are generally perceived of as works by good willed people selflessly striving to improve the lives of the less fortunate We have little reason to think that these individuals might be motivated by the same hubris that led 19th century Europe to establish empires across the world Stanford historian JP Daughton wants to change that An associate professor of modern European history Daughton s research interests span imperialism and the history of humanitarianism His latest work traces the roots of modern humanitarianism to a set of colonial development projects in the early 20th century Most histories of humanitarianism jump from international efforts to end slavery in the early 19th century to post World War II humanitarian and refugee efforts But Daughton says this

    Original URL path: https://history.stanford.edu/news/stanford-historian-uncovers-dark-roots-humanitarianism (2015-10-06)
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  • From the roots of slavery to the spread of AIDS, Stanford historian J.P. Daughton investigates the dark side of European humanitarianism. | Department of History
    the spread of AIDS Stanford historian J P Daughton investigates the dark side of European humanitarianism J P Daughton explores the central role human suffering in the rise and fall of French imperialsm Steve Castillo Feb 26 2015 Stanford Humanities Center J P Daughton is an associate professor of modern European history at Stanford who studies imperialism and the history of humanitarianism A 2014 2015 Stanford Humanities Center Internal Faculty Fellow Daughton is working on his book project Humanity So Far Away Violence Humanitarianism and Human Rights in the Modern French Empire which contextualizes the development of European sensibilities regarding violence global suffering and human rights Based on research in archives on five continents the project explores the central role that human suffering played as an experience a moral concept and a political force in the rise and fall of French imperialism from the late 1800s to the 1960s Daughton s previous publication An Empire Divided Religion Republicanism and the Making of French Colonialism 1880 1914 Oxford University Press explores the story of how troubled relations between Catholic missionaries and republican critics shaped colonial policies To read the complete article visit the Stanford Humanities Center website About About the Department

    Original URL path: https://history.stanford.edu/news/roots-slavery-spread-aids-stanford-historian-jp-daughton-investigates-dark-side-european (2015-10-06)
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  • American Historical Association lifetime achievement award | Department of History
    expert on 18th century France Baker s scholarship on the cultural and political origins of the French Revolution has offered a new understanding of that event and its significance in the creation of modern politics The J E Wallace Sterling Professor in the Humanities Baker also wrote a definitive study of the Marquis de Condorcet one of the great figures of the French Enlightenment and Revolution Keith Baker has been one of the most influential voices in helping us to understand exactly how the nature and terms of politics and the very shape and purpose of knowledge changed in the era of the French Revolution said PAULA FINDLEN chair of the History Department This award is a wonderful and fitting tribute to the impact that he has had on multiple generations of scholars colleagues and students Baker who has taught at Stanford since 1988 directed the Stanford Humanities Center from 1995 to 2000 During his tenure he introduced the Geballe Research Workshops an integral part of the programming at the center that continues to flourish today The workshops form the largest research program in the humanities at Stanford outside the departments said CAROLINE WINTERER current director of the Humanities Center The workshops are a tribute to Keith s vision of the importance of rigorous creative interchange as part of the basic process of humanistic inquiry Baker has held a Guggenheim Fellowship has been named Chevalier dans l Ordre des Palmes Académiques and is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Philosophical Society The AHA has recognized internationally what Keith Baker s colleagues and students experience locally at Stanford every day Winterer said His extraordinary capacity to crack open a scholar s project in the most generous way to help us to see

    Original URL path: https://history.stanford.edu/news/american-historical-association-lifetime-achievement-award (2015-10-06)
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  • Social Movements, Mobilization, and Contestation in the Middle East and North Africa (Second Edition) | Department of History
    Mobilization and Contestation in the Middle East and North Africa Second Edition Joel Beinin Frédéric Vairel Stanford University Press Jan 2013 The Middle East and North Africa have become places that almost everyone knows something about Too frequently written off as culturally defined by Islam strongly anti Western and uniquely susceptible to irrational political radicalism authoritarianism and terrorism these regions are rarely considered as sites of social and political mobilization However this new volume reveals a rich array of mobilizations that neither lead inexorably toward democratization nor degenerate into violence These case studies of Morocco Egypt Lebanon Saudi Arabia and Turkey are inspired by social movement theory but also critique and expand the horizons of the theory s classical concepts of political opportunity structures collective action frames mobilization structures and repertoires of contention through intensive fieldwork This strong empirical base allows for a nuanced understanding of contexts culturally conditioned rationality the strengths and weaknesses of local networks and innovation in contentious action in a region where with the exception of Turkey there was little sign of broad based movements for democratization until the Tunisian and Egyptian uprisings of 2010 11 Stanford University Press About About the Department Degree Programs Undergraduate

    Original URL path: https://history.stanford.edu/publications/social-movements-mobilization-and-contestation-middle-east-and-north-africa-second (2015-10-06)
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