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  • ​Ada Poon: How miniaturized electronic devices can be used as medical therapeutics
    knew nothing about biology she recalls with a quiet laugh Now that I think about it I was very brave But Poon s academic training her work in industry and her life experience had given her a needs based approach to research The problem with chemotherapy or any drug therapy is the lack of active control and response to feedback Once the infusion or pill goes into the patient s body all the doctor can do is wait and watch and perhaps adjust the dose or the frequency These therapies can t self regulate based on feedback from the body in order to increase or decrease their effects in accordance with the patient s needs Adding control and feedback are what electrical engineers are good at Electronic devices Poon knew could be programmed to respond to the body s feedback and modulate their own effects after being implanted in the body thus offering the potential for a closed loop system that could improve therapeutic outcomes Researchers have come up with a term for this emerging category of devices electroceuticals But when Poon started her research it was easier to say electroceutical than it was to build one Size was a problem Pacemakers cochlear implants and other devices designed to work in the human body were too bulky to work locally on say nerve fibers Power was an even bigger obstacle to creating electroceuticals Engineers already knew how to miniaturize the electronics in any device But batteries were difficult to shrink and running wires from the outside of the body to a device implanted within would be risky and impractical Wireless power transfer technologies did exist for uses such as the electric toothbrush But wireless power transfer to a miniaturized medical device implanted deep inside the body seemed impossible The prevailing assumption was that the efficiency would be too low to be practical Both Poon s education in information theory and mathematics and her work experience in wireless communications pushed her to reject the assumptions that had held back the development of electronic medical devices That s what I think engineering is about Poon says There are certain needs and we expand our skill set to solve the problem Over a period of several years working alongside biologists in an interdisciplinary setting Poon started from scratch and discovered how to safely and efficiently beam electromagnetic energy into the body This has enabled her team to create tiny electronic devices that can be wirelessly powered or recharged from outside the body One minuscule prototype is designed to swim through a patient s circulatory system to deliver drugs or perform tests Another is a pacemaker smaller than a grain of rice It can be recharged when necessary by holding a credit card sized power transmitter up to the chest Currently Poon is helping to design a wireless biosensor that could continuously monitor the drug concentration in the bloodstream of chemotherapy patients so that the dose can be self regulated and save patients from

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/print/node/38711 (2016-04-27)
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  • Electrical Engineering | Engineering
    education In conversation with Tina Seelig director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program at the DFJ Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Series Hennessy also shares insights from his entrepreneurial career in the high tech industry Wednesday April 13 2016 Last modified Wed 13 Apr 2016 at 11 44 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Aeronautics and Astronautics Bioengineering Chemical Engineering Civil and Environmental Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Management Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Mechanical Engineering Science Technology and Society Shan Wang How magnetic nanoparticles can be used as medical sensors Type Research News A team of researchers tracks disease the way naturalists track animals in the wild By Carrie Kirby Slug Shan Wang How magnetic nanoparticles can be used as medical sensors Short Dek A team of researchers tracks disease the way naturalists track animals in the wild A time lapse image shows the trajectories of tumor cells green after being stained with fluorescent dyes and labeled with magnetic nanoparticles Image courtesy of R J Wilson C M Earhart and S X Wang Tuesday April 12 2016 Last modified Tue 12 Apr 2016 at 16 55 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Bioengineering Electrical Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Engineering Physics Science Technology and Society Life Sciences and Healthcare Material Science Ada Poon How miniaturized electronic devices can be used as medical therapeutics Type Research News Inspired by personal experience an engineer pioneers the development of electroceuticals that can dispense treatments or monitor functions deep inside the body By Carrie Kirby Slug Ada Poon How miniaturized electronic devices can be used as medical therapeutics Short Dek An engineer pioneers electroceuticals that can dispense treatments or monitor functions inside the body Ada Poon is developing tiny electronic devices to dispense treatments or monitor functions deep inside the body Photo courtesy of Poon Lab Tuesday April 12 2016 Last modified Mon 25 Apr 2016 at 8 56 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Bioengineering Electrical Engineering Science Technology and Society Life Sciences and Healthcare How could we use the tiniest specs of diamonds Type Research News Extracting nanodiamonds from crude oil could help produce next generation tools for imaging and communications By Glennda Chui Slug How could we use the tiniest specs of diamonds Short Dek Extracting nanodiamonds from crude oil could help to produce next generation tools for imaging and communications Too small to see with the naked eye diamondoids are visible only when they clump together in fine sugar like crystals like these Photo by Christopher Smith SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Monday April 11 2016 Last modified Mon 11 Apr 2016 at 8 20 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Bioengineering Chemical Engineering Electrical Engineering Engineering Physics Science Technology and Society Electronics and Photonics What will the batteries and electronics of the future look like Type Research News A team of researchers peer deep into materials with ultrafast science By Glenn Roberts Jr Slug What will the

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/category/departments/electrical-engineering (2016-04-27)
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  • ​Zhenan Bao: On a quest to develop artificial skin
    the industrial applications for flexible electronics such as computer displays and sensors for automobiles and robotics She saw the greater challenge and most significant potential in developing a new generation of flexible stretchable electronics an artificial skin that will one day communicate directly with the human brain just like our natural covering I feel that this is an area that if we are successful will really benefit people she says Since coming to Stanford Bao has worked with her research team to discover new materials and sensory technologies that replicate different aspects of human skin including flexibility stretchability self healing biodegradability and sensitivity to pressure The ultimate application of Bao s vision would be covering a prosthetic limb with a sheet of electronic sensors that act like human skin and allow an amputee to feel everything from a child s kiss to a hot pot handle To achieve this the material would need the physical characteristics of skin sensors that mimic the many different types of nerves in skin flexible circuitry to carry electronic signals from the sensors and a technology to translate this electronic sensory information into the equivalent of nerve impulses understood by the brain All of this is difficult Today s electronic materials are rigid They don t bend or stretch And even after creating flexible electronics the challenge remains of creating an interface between electronic circuits and biological nerves To put a piece of synthetic material onto the body and allow it to actually communicate with the brain requires breakthroughs in many different areas Bao says Her lab has made a start Its most advanced material can mimic human skin s pressure sensing capability and generate electrical pulses that our brain would understand Her team is striving to add other sensations and temperature sensitivities to enable the artificial skin to sense everything that human skin can feel She is collaborating with neurosurgeons and neuroscientists on how to make the electronic to biological connection Despite the complexity of the project she is optimistic that an early version of prosthetic skin could be tested in just a few years On the way toward that ambitious goal of creating skin like coverings for prosthetics Bao believes her smart flexible electronics could create products more useful than the plastic wristbands in use today Flexible electronics that provide intimate contact with human bodies allow us to potentially extract more accurate information about health conditions she explains This would provide information that people actually care about blood pressure for example or glucose levels or the chemicals that may be generated in sweat that are related to stress Already her team is developing a prototype bandage like wearable blood pressure sensor that could comfortably provide continuous monitoring for patients with cardiovascular problems In addition to this bandage model Bao imagines designing flexible electronics into clothing fabric At the same time she is exploring the use of biocompatible electronics as subdermal implants Think about these as electronics devices that you can wear inside the

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/print/node/38720 (2016-04-27)
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  • Materials Science and Engineering | Engineering
    April 13 2016 Last modified Wed 13 Apr 2016 at 11 44 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Aeronautics and Astronautics Bioengineering Chemical Engineering Civil and Environmental Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Management Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Mechanical Engineering Science Technology and Society Shan Wang How magnetic nanoparticles can be used as medical sensors Type Research News A team of researchers tracks disease the way naturalists track animals in the wild By Carrie Kirby Slug Shan Wang How magnetic nanoparticles can be used as medical sensors Short Dek A team of researchers tracks disease the way naturalists track animals in the wild A time lapse image shows the trajectories of tumor cells green after being stained with fluorescent dyes and labeled with magnetic nanoparticles Image courtesy of R J Wilson C M Earhart and S X Wang Tuesday April 12 2016 Last modified Tue 12 Apr 2016 at 16 55 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Bioengineering Electrical Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Engineering Physics Science Technology and Society Life Sciences and Healthcare Material Science Could a new catalyst use sunlight to efficiently extract hydrogen from water Type Research News Hydrogen powered vehicles offer a clean alternative to running cars with fossil fuels This chemical engineering discovery brings that closer to reality Stanford Engineering Staff Slug Could a new catalyst use sunlight to efficiently extract hydrogen from water Short Dek Hydrogen powered vehicles offer a clean alternative to running cars with fossil fuels This chemical engineering discovery brings that closer to reality Renewables Reuters Mike Blake Thursday March 31 2016 Last modified Fri 1 Apr 2016 at 8 56 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Chemical Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Engineering Physics Science Technology and Society Electronics and Photonics What will the batteries and electronics of the future look like Type Research News A team of researchers peer deep into materials with ultrafast science By Glenn Roberts Jr Slug What will the batteries and electronics of the future look like Short Dek A team of researchers peer deep into materials with ultrafast science Visualizing the properties of nanoscale materials at ultrafast time scales Photo courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thursday March 31 2016 Last modified Thu 31 Mar 2016 at 16 42 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Electrical Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Engineering Physics Science Technology and Society Material Science In celebration of EARTH DAY In celebration of EARTH DAY Get inspired by students who have created new devices built businesses participated in policy making or worked in an NGO in pursuit of sustainability and how you can too Date Time Tuesday April 19 2016 1 00 pm 4 45 pm Location Arrillaga Alumni Center Sponsors Sponsored by the TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy Stanford Precourt Institute for Energy Stanford School of Earth Energy Environmental Sciences Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment Office of Sustainability Stanford Residential Dining Enterprises URL More

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/category/departments/materials-science-and-engineering (2016-04-27)
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  • Mechanical Engineering | Engineering
    Wednesday April 13 2016 Last modified Wed 13 Apr 2016 at 11 44 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Aeronautics and Astronautics Bioengineering Chemical Engineering Civil and Environmental Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Management Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Mechanical Engineering Science Technology and Society Meet the Makers Type Research News In the Stanford Product Realization Lab students get back in touch with the process of making and building things Edited by Sarah Bielecki Slug Meet the Makers Short Dek In the Stanford Product Realization Lab students get back in touch with the process of making and building things Photos courtesy of Tamer Shabani Each quarter mechanical engineering s Stanford Product Realization Lab hosts an event to allow students to showcase projects they designed and manufactured in the foundry the woodworking lab the welding lab or the machining lab We sat down with seven students to hear more about their Winter 2016 projects Tuesday April 5 2016 Last modified Tue 5 Apr 2016 at 15 01 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Civil and Environmental Engineering Computer Science Mechanical Engineering Science Technology and Society Stanford Design Program Ford Motor Company CEO To innovate one must challenge customs and question traditions Type Research News Mark Fields discusses the evolution of the auto industry and how the business he leads is moving from an auto company to an auto and mobility company By Sarah Bielecki Slug Ford Motor Company CEO To innovate one must challenge customs and question traditions Short Dek Mark Fields discusses the evolution of the auto industry and how the business he leads is moving from an auto company to an auto and mobility company Ford s Mark Fields in Detroit Reuters Mark Blinch Friday March 18 2016 Last modified Fri 18 Mar 2016 at 11 20 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Computer Science Management Science and Engineering Mechanical Engineering Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering iCME Science Technology and Society Stanford Design Program Automotive Robotics Musical training gives Stanford engineers a creative lift Type Research News A fellowship offered jointly by the School of Engineering and the Friends of Music at Stanford provides music lessons to engineering students By Andrew Myers Slug Musical training gives Stanford engineers a creative lift Short Dek A fellowship offered jointly by the School of Engineering and the Friends of Music at Stanford provides music lessons to engineering students Stanford engineers can get s cholarships to study music and other arts REUTERS Jo Yong Hak Wednesday March 16 2016 Last modified Wed 16 Mar 2016 at 9 36 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Aeronautics and Astronautics Bioengineering Chemical Engineering Civil and Environmental Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Management Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Mechanical Engineering Architectural Design Program Energy Resources Engineering Engineering Physics Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering iCME Science Technology and Society Stanford Design Program Lessons in leadership from a 92 year old product designer

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/category/departments/mechanical-engineering (2016-04-27)
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  • Electronics and Photonics | Engineering
    Engineering Electrical Engineering Engineering Physics Science Technology and Society Electronics and Photonics Could a new catalyst use sunlight to efficiently extract hydrogen from water Type Research News Hydrogen powered vehicles offer a clean alternative to running cars with fossil fuels This chemical engineering discovery brings that closer to reality Stanford Engineering Staff Slug Could a new catalyst use sunlight to efficiently extract hydrogen from water Short Dek Hydrogen powered vehicles offer a clean alternative to running cars with fossil fuels This chemical engineering discovery brings that closer to reality Renewables Reuters Mike Blake Thursday March 31 2016 Last modified Fri 1 Apr 2016 at 8 56 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Chemical Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Engineering Physics Science Technology and Society Electronics and Photonics On the road to a safer driving experience Type Research News By testing the physical limits of speeding cars a group of engineers hope to develop safer autonomous driving systems By Bjorn Carey Slug On the road to a safer driving experience Short Dek Engineers test autonomous car algorithms in the quest for safer driving Shelley Stanford s autonomous Audi TTS on the track at Thunderhill Raceway north of Sacramento Calif Stanford News Service Steve Fyffe When Stanford s autonomous car Shelley nears speeds of 120 mph as it tears around a racetrack without a driver observers natural inclinations are to exchange high fives or simply mouth wow Wednesday March 2 2016 Last modified Mon 14 Mar 2016 at 15 53 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Computer Science Electrical Engineering Mechanical Engineering Science Technology and Society Electronics and Photonics Martin Hellman Finding the truth is more important than getting your way Type Research Profile An inventor of public key cryptography explains why listening is the key to solving problems in one s personal life and everywhere else By Andrew Myers Slug Martin Hellman Finding the truth is more important than getting your way Short Dek The co inventor of public key cryptography explains why listening is the key to solving problems in one s personal life and everywhere else Cryptography remains as controversial today as it was in the mid 1970s when Martin Hellman was doing his seminal work Reuters Lucy Nicholson Tuesday March 1 2016 Last modified Mon 14 Mar 2016 at 15 55 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Computer Science Electrical Engineering Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering iCME Electronics and Photonics Stanford cryptography pioneers win the ACM 2015 A M Turing Award Type Research News A groundbreaking algorithm from Martin Hellman and Whitfield Diffie enabled a secure Internet By Steve Fyffe and Tom Abate Slug Stanford cryptography pioneers win the ACM 2015 A M Turing Award Short Dek A groundbreaking algorithm from Martin Hellman and Whitfield Diffie enabled a secure Internet Stanford s Martin Hellman center and Whitfield Diffie right winners of the 2015 A M Turing Award are shown with Ralph Merkle of UC Berkeley in this 1977 photo

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/category/industries/electronics-and-photonics (2016-04-27)
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  • Material Science | Engineering
    Materials Science and Engineering Engineering Physics Science Technology and Society Material Science The body s biggest defender may one day be smaller than you think Type Research Profile A group of researchers shows how nanomedicine is changing the path of cancer diagnosis and treatment By Krista Conger Slug The body s biggest defender may one day be smaller than you think Short Dek A group of researchers shows how nanomedicine is changing the path of cancer diagnosis and treatment T lymphocytes and cancer cell iStock luismmolina Friday March 18 2016 Last modified Fri 18 Mar 2016 at 13 50 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Bioengineering Electrical Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Science Technology and Society Life Sciences and Healthcare Material Science Can large scale solar power storage become a reality Type Research News An unexpected finding by a team of engineers could lead to a revolutionary change in how we produce store and consume energy By Glen Martin Slug Can large scale solar power storage become a reality Short Dek An unexpected finding by a team of engineers could lead to a revolutionary change in how we produce store and consume energy The solar energy of the past Reuters Stringer Friday February 26 2016 Last modified Tue 22 Mar 2016 at 14 04 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Chemical Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Energy Resources Engineering Science Technology and Society Electronics and Photonics Material Science The University of the Future Learning across the Lifespan 4 30 7 00 pm Tuesday March 1 2016 Huang Engineering Mackenzie Room Map RSVP here Required Date Time Tuesday March 1 2016 4 30 pm 7 00 pm Location Jen Hsun Engineering Building Mackenzie Room Sponsors Office of the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning Contact Info vptlevents stanford edu Admission RSVP required Last modified Tue 23 Feb 2016 at 16 07 Read more Current students Faculty Staff Aeronautics and Astronautics Bioengineering Chemical Engineering Civil and Environmental Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Management Science and Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Mechanical Engineering Architectural Design Program Energy Resources Engineering Engineering Physics Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering iCME Science Technology and Society Stanford Design Program Automotive Electronics and Photonics Life Sciences and Healthcare Material Science Online Education Robotics MEET THE MAKERS Winter 2016 Student Showcase 9 30 am Wednesday March 16 2016 The Atrium Peterson Building 550 Stanford Map Date Time Wednesday March 16 2016 9 30 am 11 30 am Admission Free open to the public URL More info Last modified Thu 11 Feb 2016 at 16 33 Read more Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Bioengineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Mechanical Engineering Science Technology and Society Stanford Design Program Electronics and Photonics Life Sciences and Healthcare Material Science Robotics Meet Hedgehog Your tour guide to asteroids comets and other things that whirl around the solar system Type Research News A team of engineers builds a cube like rover for exploration in

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/category/industries/material-science (2016-04-27)
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  • How effective data visualizations let users have a conversation with data
    in a way that s accessible to a general audience Deriso says Interactive data visualizations are powerful marketing tools for academia and industry Interactive data visualizations are living breathing representations of data Because they update dynamically interactive data visualizations allow users to extract information based on their specific interest Interactive visualizations are engaging When a user enjoys interactively exploring your data they are more likely to understand and appreciate it says Deriso Previously complex 3D visualizations required specialized applications and high performance computers Recent advances in browser based 3D graphics powered by WebGL have enabled these sophisticated scientific visualizations to be made available online Web interfaces also allow these visualizations to become compelling interactive experiences In this example a WebGL library called Three js powers a sophisticated MRI image of a brain in 3D with several layers of information overlaid Animation features of the library allow the brain to smoothly morph into different representations from a standard brain to a flat map like view A 2D plot on the right serves as an interface for displaying different data sets collected from the study while simultaneously serving as a visual depiction of the results of the experiment This was a wonderful neuroscience experiment and the visualization made it quite popular among neuroscientists explains Deriso You used to only see images of the brain printed in the research article but now you could share the entire dataset view it and interact with it all from one link Deriso also discussed how these tools could be ported to immersive virtual reality platforms such as Google Cardboard and Oculus Rift If you happen to have a Google Cardboard handy here is an example of a visualization where you are standing in the middle of a room while an algorithm computes a simulation of birds flocking around you Deriso believes interactive web based 2D 3D and VR will be the future of data visualization It s important to understand what kind of visual will allow for the best representation of data Well designed visuals allow readers to easily understand a lot of quantitative data at once Unfortunately poorly designed visuals are everywhere in reports magazines books on TV and the internet Using computer vision and machine learning two processes that attempt to duplicate the abilities of human vision by electronically perceiving and understanding an image Agrawala s research focuses on figuring out how to let machines access the wealth of information locked inside of charts and graphs so that ultimately visuals can be redesigned to be more accurate and also easier to understand Well designed visuals make it easy for readers to extract important information quickly The National Institutes of Health NIH pie chart below was created to show the percentage of budget devoted to research for various diseases in 2005 A reader can easily see from this pie chart that AIDS research takes up the largest percentage of the 2005 budget But it isn t as easy to determine if NIH dedicated more budget

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/print/node/38719 (2016-04-27)
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