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  • James Freeman: Subtle notes of coffee and philosophy | Engineering
    Mechanical Engineering Institutes Hasso Plattner Institute of Design Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment Search this site Primary links About Research Faculty Admissions Education Collaborations James Freeman Subtle notes of coffee and philosophy Home About News Updates James Freeman Subtle notes of coffee and philosophy Blue Bottle CEO James Freeman draws on his former life as a musician and his love of philosophy to deliver a unique coffee experience DFJ Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Series James Freeman the soft spoken founder and CEO of Blue Bottle Coffee shares his entrepreneurial journey from the farmers market where he learned commerce in its purest form to opening cafes across the country Freeman visited Stanford Engineering recently as a speaker for the DFJ Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Series sponsored by the Stanford Technology Ventures Program During his talk Freeman explains how customer experience is part of a product and shares the inspiration he draws from philosophy literature and other cultures For more video content from the Stanford Technology Ventures Program DFJ Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Series click here http etl stanford edu Friday April 1 2016 Last modified Fri 1 Apr 2016 at 10 34 Printer friendly version Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Management Science and Engineering Science Technology and Society News By Department Aeronautics and Astronautics Bioengineering Chemical Engineering Civil and Environmental Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Management Science and Engineering Mechanical Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Share This Media contact Tom Abate tabate stanford edu 650 736 2245 News By Topic Automotive Electronics and Photonics Life Sciences and Healthcare Material Science Online Education Robotics Engineering News How the shape and structure of nanoparticles affects energy storage A team of engineers obtain a first look inside phase changing nanoparticles and find that

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/news/james-freeman-subtle-notes-coffee-philosophy (2016-04-27)
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  • What will the batteries and electronics of the future look like? | Engineering
    of a material that might someday be used in flexible electronics Another study observed semiconductor crystals called quantum dots because they defy classical physics at the nanoscale expand and shrink in response to ultrafast pulses of laser light Researchers have used SLAC s experiment for ultrafast electron diffraction UED one of the world s fastest electron cameras to take snapshots of a three atom thick layer of a promising material as it wrinkles in response to a laser pulse Understanding these dynamic ripples could provide crucial clues for the development of next generation solar cells electronics and catalysts Revealing such intriguing properties at the nanoscale gives clues about the fundamental nature of materials and how they perform in applications we rely on for energy or information Even though some of these materials are completely embedded in everyday technologies not a lot is understood about how they work says Lindenberg who is an associate professor of materials science and engineering and of photon science Working at the intersection of materials science and engineering Lindenberg and his team have a particular focus on finding promising materials for next generation electronics light based data storage technologies and energy applications There are a broad range of new properties that emerge at the nanoscale Lindenberg says The tiniest samples with just tens or hundreds of atoms can have nearly flawless structures that make them ideal test tubes for very fundamental questions about what happens when a material transforms The team uses different types of laser light at SLAC and Stanford labs to learn how simple tweaks in the size shape and design of materials can change their basic properties in unexpected ways which could lead to new applications Taking advantage of the powerful X rays at SLAC facilities including the Linac Coherent Light Source and

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/news/what-will-batteries-electronics-future-look (2016-04-27)
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  • Could a new catalyst use sunlight to efficiently extract hydrogen from water? | Engineering
    photocatalysis What if we could make hydrogen using sunlight from abundant compounds We wouldn t have to produce it from fossil fuels which has global warming effects said Cargnello who worked on this project while he was a Penn postdoc and is now carrying this work forward as an assistant professor of chemical engineering at Stanford If we could get that hydrogen from a renewable source then the entire process would be totally sustainable said Paolo Fornasiero a University of Trieste professor of chemical and pharmaceutical sciences who collaborated with the Murray team on hydrogen measurements On its face the process sounds straightforward Titania absorbs sunlight which initiates a chemical reaction that generates hydrogen But the vehicles responsible for this response called electrons and holes tend to jump the gun reacting with each other almost immediately due to their opposite charges They also execute different functions with the negatively charged electrons carrying out reductions and the positively charged holes performing oxidations What you want is that electron to reduce the water to hydrogen and that hole to oxidize the water to oxygen such that the combination of these two half reactions produces hydrogen gas on one side and oxygen gas on the other Cargnello said To attempt to stop the electrons and holes from reacting too soon the research team put space between them using nanorods sized precisely from 15 to 50 nanometers eventually determining that the longest rod resulted in the best activity Though the experiment parameters didn t allow them to build beyond 50 nanometers the scientists had essentially forced the electrons and holes to react with water rather than each other Cargnello said what they ve learned can be a playbook for others in the field If you want to have more efficient photocatalysts he said make elongated structures to create these highways for electrons to escape from holes and react much faster with the molecules This team isn t the first to attempt such an experiment with titania according to Murray who has appointments in the School of Arts Sciences and the School of Engineering and Applied Science Titania is Earth abundant and non toxic highly desirable as a material for solar energy conversion he said Many researchers are working to improve the efficiency with which it uses the solar spectrum Murray s team opted to use solution phase chemistry a bottom up approach instead of a process many others employ called fabrication which is top down With fabricated structures you take a big chunk and cut it down into smaller and smaller features Cargnello said There is a limit to how small these structures can be however and the production is not scalable In the Murray lab we added one atom to another to make the nanorods with precise control at the nanoscale and potential scalability Jason Baxter s team at Drexel explored the photo dynamics of these systems Though the chemical process gets much more exact it hasn t yet lead Murray s team

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/news/could-new-catalyst-use-sunlight-efficiently-extract-hydrogen-water (2016-04-27)
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  • Minnie Ingersoll: A drive to disrupt | Engineering
    Engineering Materials Science Engineering Mechanical Engineering Institutes Hasso Plattner Institute of Design Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment Search this site Primary links About Research Faculty Admissions Education Collaborations Minnie Ingersoll A drive to disrupt Home About News Updates Minnie Ingersoll A drive to disrupt Shift COO Minnie Ingersoll explains how the company is bringing trust and simplicity to the used car market DFJ Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Series Entrepreneur Minnie Ingersoll talks about how a computer science degree an MBA and 11 years at Google prepared her to co found the online auto marketplace Shift In a recent visit to Stanford Engineering Ingersoll spoke at the DFJ Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Series sponsored by the Stanford Technology Ventures Program Calling her startup a car company with Google DNA Ingersoll offers insights on opportunity recognition product management career life balance and the importance of traits like humility and patience For more video content from the Stanford Technology Ventures Program DFJ Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Series click here http etl stanford edu Wednesday March 30 2016 Last modified Wed 30 Mar 2016 at 10 50 Printer friendly version Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Computer Science Management Science and Engineering Science Technology and Society Automotive News By Department Aeronautics and Astronautics Bioengineering Chemical Engineering Civil and Environmental Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Management Science and Engineering Mechanical Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Share This Media contact Tom Abate tabate stanford edu 650 736 2245 News By Topic Automotive Electronics and Photonics Life Sciences and Healthcare Material Science Online Education Robotics Engineering News How the shape and structure of nanoparticles affects energy storage A team of engineers obtain a first look inside phase changing nanoparticles and find that their Read More A one

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/news/minnie-ingersoll-drive-disrupt (2016-04-27)
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  • Harnessing big data to better understand what happens when we mix drugs | Engineering
    cholesterol lowering and antidepressant drugs causes glucose levels to rise significantly Drawing on data in a public FDA database Altman and his student Nicholas Tatonetti found that patients taking pravastatin a common cholesterol lowering drug and paroxetine a common antidepressant at the same time were experiencing significant increases in their blood glucose levels Additional data mined with collaborators from Stanford Harvard and Vanderbilt revealed 150 more patients who were taking pravastatin and paroxetine at the same time and who were also experiencing increased blood glucose levels This was a big deal Altman said Two drugs that on their own were deemed safe by the FDA were pushing patients to develop diabetes when taken together We have to publish this Altman said And they did but their work didn t stop there Patient Internet search queries reveal clues about side effects of mixing drugs The research team began to wonder if the patients taking these two drugs were noticing side effects of hyperglycemia or high blood glucose and if so how they could determine it To find out the researchers did what lots of patients do when they begin to experience unusual side effects from a new medication They went to the Internet With help from Microsoft data scientists they conducted a study defining 50 words or phrases that a person might type into a search engine if he or she were experiencing high blood glucose words like fatigue loss of appetite and urinating a lot They called these diabetes words and found that about 0 5 to 1 of all searches on the Internet involve one of them If someone typed in paroxetine the name of the antidepressant the search rate for the defined diabetes words went up about 2 If someone typed in pravastatin the name of the cholesterol lowering drug the search rate for the defined diabetes words went up about 3 If someone typed both paroxetine and pravastatin the search rate for the defined diabetes words went up to 10 a three to fourfold increase from the baseline This was proof that patients were in fact indirectly sharing their side effects through online searches We can t close data off to research it s too rich a source of inspiration innovation and discovery Altman s team s important discoveries were made possible thanks to the patient research data they accessed through the FDA Stanford Harvard Vanderbilt and Microsoft While concerns about data privacy and security grow Altman argues we can t close data off to research it is too rich of a source of inspiration innovation and discovery for new things in medicine The ability to mine new sources of data creates opportunities that don t otherwise exist to detect problematic drugs or drug combinations earlier than ever before There is still more work to be done Altman says He points out the importance of remembering that people don t just use pairs of drugs there are patients who are on three four five six or nine

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/news/harnessing-big-data-better-understand-what-happens-when-we-mix-drugs (2016-04-27)
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  • Michael Tubbs: Solving social ills through innovation | Engineering
    Education Collaborations Michael Tubbs Solving social ills through innovation Home About News Updates Michael Tubbs Solving social ills through innovation Stockton city councilmember and Stanford alum Michael Tubbs argues for a people centric view of problem solving DFJ Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Seminar Civic leader Michael Tubbs shares his story of growing up in the California Central Valley attending Stanford and going on to become one of the youngest elected officials in U S history The Stockton city councilmember calls on entrepreneurs behind today s biggest tech innovations to also focus on solving society s biggest problems like poverty illiteracy and inequality For more video content from the Stanford Technology Ventures Program Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Seminar click here http etl stanford edu Friday March 25 2016 Last modified Fri 25 Mar 2016 at 10 52 Printer friendly version Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Management Science and Engineering Science Technology and Society News By Department Aeronautics and Astronautics Bioengineering Chemical Engineering Civil and Environmental Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Management Science and Engineering Mechanical Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Share This Media contact Tom Abate tabate stanford edu 650 736 2245 News By Topic Automotive Electronics and Photonics Life Sciences

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/news/michael-tubbs-solving-social-ills-through-innovation (2016-04-27)
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  • Federica Marchionni: Adaptability is key to staying ahead of the curve | Engineering
    Adaptability is key to staying ahead of the curve Home About News Updates Federica Marchionni Adaptability is key to staying ahead of the curve The CEO of clothing retailer Lands End discusses the importance of embracing change on the path to growth DFJ Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Seminar Lands End CEO Federica Marchionni shares lessons from her career as a leader at some of the most recognizable luxury lifestyle brands in retail including Dolce Gabbana and Ferrari She emphasizes the importance of excellence over perfection and adopting a 360 degree mindset that will allow you to embrace change be adaptable and identify opportunities for personal growth For more video content from the Stanford Technology Ventures Program Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Seminar click here http etl stanford edu Friday March 25 2016 Last modified Fri 25 Mar 2016 at 9 18 Printer friendly version Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Management Science and Engineering Science Technology and Society News By Department Aeronautics and Astronautics Bioengineering Chemical Engineering Civil and Environmental Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Management Science and Engineering Mechanical Engineering Materials Science and Engineering Share This Media contact Tom Abate tabate stanford edu 650 736 2245 News By Topic Automotive Electronics

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/news/federica-marchionni-adaptability-key-staying-ahead-curve (2016-04-27)
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  • What is the relationship between the brain and risky behavior? | Engineering
    time one can t always live long enough to take advantage of it he said However a minority within each species studied tends to prefer risk And even largely risk averse individuals sometimes choose riskier options The researchers focused on a complex of brain circuitry known as the reward system that is shared by every living creature from flies to humans This circuitry s evolutionary conservation is due to its essential role in guiding individuals behavior and ensuring species survival by inducing pleasurable sensations and boosting motivation in response to the anticipation or realization of behaviors such as eating and mating Reward system s key nerve tract A core feature of the reward system is a nerve tract projecting from a deep brain structure called the ventral tegmental area to another structure in the forebrain the nucleus accumbens Nerve cells in this tract can secrete a chemical called dopamine that binds to surface receptors residing on some nerve cells in the nucleus accumbens This in turn ignites activity within the cells that harbor dopamine receptors The receptors fall mainly into two categories DR1 and DR2 that are mostly found on different cells Drawing on hints from the medical literature including previous human brain imaging research by study co author Brian Knutson associate professor of psychology indicating increased activity in the nucleus accumbens when people were considering taking risks the researchers zeroed in on activity in DR2 containing nerve cells in the nucleus accumbens during the decision making process They used a single hair thin optical fiber implanted in the rats nucleus accumbens to both monitor electrochemical signals in the nucleus accumbens a technique called fiber photometry and precisely duplicate these naturally occurring signals timing and magnitude by stimulating cells with light a technique called optogenetics Both techniques were pioneered in Deisseroth s lab The scientists targeted DR2 cells in rats that had been trained and fitted for both fiber photometry and optogenetics with a thin implanted optical fiber that allowed the rats to move freely The experiments that followed were designed by Zalocusky and her colleagues including Knutson and Deisseroth Mmm sugar water The rats could initiate a session by poking their nose into a hole at which point two levers would pop out Pulling one lever the rats soon learned resulted in a dependable dose of sugar water always the same size Pulling the other lever would yield a much smaller sugar water dose most of the time but a much larger one every so often The system was set up so that either lever would earn a rat the same total payoff eventually Once trained about two thirds of the rats proved risk averse consistently choosing the steady paying salary The remaining one third were risk seeking freelance types If the researchers tricked the rats by reversing the levers payoffs the rats responded by switching levers each adhering to its own preferred reward schedule Occasionally though a rat of either type would check out the neglected option If

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/research-profile/what-relationship-between-brain-risky-behavior (2016-04-27)
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