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  • Your Department News - The Year in Review
    in all our departments Aero Astro Bioengineering Chemical Engineering Read the Aero Astro letter Bioengineering news ChemE news Civil Environmental Computer Science Electrical Engineering Read the CEE letter READ the CS letter Read the EE letter Management Science Engineering Materials Science Engineering Mechanical Engineering Read the MS E letter MSE news Read the ME letter Questions Please contact Suzanne Morze Annual Fund Manager suzanne morze stanford edu 2016 AA Letter

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/print/node/37335 (2016-04-27)
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  • Report on Annual Giving | Engineering
    met with even bigger ideas Nowhere is this more apparent than at the Stanford School of Engineering Jim Plummer The Department of Mechanical Engineering welcomed David Lentink in May 2012 Originally from the Netherlands Professor Lentink obtained BSc and MSc degrees in aerospace engineering from Delft University of Technology He went on to earn a PhD in experimental zoology from Wageningen University While there he studied optimal fluid mechanic strategies in animal swimming and flight He joined the faculty at Stanford because of its interdisciplinary nature I made the choice to come to Stanford because my work depends on biomechanics engineering design fluid mechanics and biology All of these departments are world class here With support from annual gifts Professor Lentink set up a lab where he and his students are studying bird flight to understand how the interplay between Newton s laws of motion and Darwin s theory of evolution enabled birds to develop into the most accomplished flying animals on the planet Based on these findings Professor Lentink is engineering novel unmanned vehicles that can fly in complex cluttered environments under realistic atmospheric conditions in which current robots fail The real world applications of his work include developing flying robots that can help during search and rescue missions He is currently organizing a project in which students will work with local birders to film birds using professional high speed cameras to glean more insight into the mechanics of bird flight He coordinated a similar project in the Netherlands which earned him the Annual Academic Prize an award given to Dutch scientists for the best proposal for a public engagement activity that features cutting edge science China Programs Mengyao Yuan was one of 16 students selected to participate in the School of Engineering s 2012 China Internship Program this past summer By interning at the Industrial Technology Research Institute she was able to work with some of Taiwan s top scientists and engineers Along with supporting faculty innovative facilities and programs that enable students to explore interests outside of engineering annual gifts have been critical to the School of Engineering s China Programs The goal of these programs is to provide Stanford students with opportunities to learn about China and gain real world experience in a culturally diverse environment They also strengthen the School of Engineering s reputation in China by fostering student exchanges and research collaborations The Summer Internship Program enhances engineering education by providing students an opportunity to learn about China s rapidly expanding role in global business and technology and gain work experience in the world s fastest growing economy This past summer 16 students participated interning in 13 organizations Since 2008 more than 60 students from sophomores to PhDs have participated in the program Along with the Summer Internship Program the annual fund supports the Research Exchange Program which promotes an exchange of PhD students between Stanford University and Peking University or Tsinghua University It also helps sponsor the Undergraduate Visiting Researchers Program through which

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/give/annual-giving/report-on-annual-giving (2016-04-27)
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  • 5 Reasons to Support Stanford | Engineering
    Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment Search this site Primary links About Research Faculty Admissions Education Collaborations 5 Reasons to Support Stanford Home Give Annual Giving 5 Reasons to Support Stanford Why Does Stanford Need Money Stanford s endowment covers only about 23 of the university s budget Stanford s endowment is not small 17 billion as of August 31 2012 but must be measured against Stanford s big mission The university must fund more than two thirds of its operating expenses from other sources The amount of endowment spent each year about 5 is carefully calibrated to enable these funds to support their purposes in perpetuity Most gifts are restricted The majority of gifts to Stanford and 75 percent of endowment funds are directed toward particular schools departments or programs Annual expendable gifts provide vital flexibility Federal funding has declined Federal support for university research is significant but it s been declining for years in real dollars The current budget environment makes such funding even more precarious Stanford s mission is global We re one of the few institutions in the world with the depth and breadth to

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/give/annual-giving/5-reasons-support-stanford (2016-04-27)
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  • How the shape and structure of nanoparticles affects energy storage
    on the electrode s ability to sustain large deformations over several charge and discharge cycles without degrading Recently scientists have improved the efficiency of this process by nanosizing the electrodes The nanoparticles allow for faster charging increased energy storage and an extended lifetime but it is unknown which nanoparticle shapes sizes and crystallinities produce the best performance Addressing this question served as inspiration for the present study Reconstructing solute induced phase transformations within individual nanocrystals Generally it is difficult to determine whether the behavior of a collection of nanoparticles is the result of each individual component performing similarly or if it is the average output of high and low performers Jennifer Dionne an assistant professor of materials science and engineering and her group have been studying the behavior of individual particles to establish a stronger link between structure and function that can direct the design of next generation energy storage materials In this experiment Dionne s group examined how varying the shapes and crystallinity of palladium nanoparticles affected their ability to absorb and release hydrogen atoms an analog to a lithium ion battery discharging and charging They prepared cubic pyramidal and icosahedral 20 sided nanoparticles and developed novel imaging techniques to look inside nanoparticles at various hydrogen pressures determining where the hydrogen was located The technique relied on an environmental transmission electron microscope allowing the engineers to discern exactly how the hydrogen was distributed within the nanoparticles and to do so with incredibly high sub 2 nanometer resolution This instrument is one of only a handful of its kind and allows us to study materials in their working environment said Tarun Narayan lead co author of the study and a recent PhD graduate from Dionne s group The microscope enables analysis of particles using several different techniques such as direct

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/print/node/38722 (2016-04-27)
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  • A one-of-a-kind wind tunnel for birds paves the way for better drones
    few dozen drones fighting for position like the taxis below It s a nightmare for drone operators But you look up and you ll see a pigeon swoop by casually It has no problem stabilizing itself flying around corners dodging cables and landing on a perch Lentink said It s just something we haven t accomplished in robotics yet We need to study birds up close so we can figure out what their secret is to flying so stably under such difficult conditions and apply that to aerial robotic design The new wind tunnel works like a super tricked out treadmill for birds The windflow generated by a fan roughly the size of a Volkswagen Beetle is super smooth Turbulence checks in around 015 percent less than half of any other bird wind tunnel in the world This allows the researchers to study how birds fly in smooth flowing air such as that found at higher altitudes Such conditions aren t typical closer to the ground particularly around trees and buildings though so the tunnel is fitted with a turbulence generating system a series of computer controlled wind vanes that can precisely simulate different turbulence patterns creating up to 50 percent turbulence In this state the flow moves almost equally randomly in all directions making it very unpredictable for the bird Cruising speed for birds Wind speed is also highly tunable The lovebirds parrotlets and hummingbirds that Lentink s lab studies typically cruise around 7 meters second which the engineers can match perfectly to study sustained flight They will occasionally crank the flow up to 15 m s which simulates a strong wind maxing out at 20 m s for large birds Lentink is fiercely protective of his birds and said this would be the maximum speed he would consider letting larger birds fly to keep them comfortable The tunnel can blow much faster however with speeds up to 50 m s for the prototype drones he plans to test in the tunnel Nearly two meters long the six sided windowed observation section of the tunnel provides Lentink and his students a variety of ways to study bird flight They currently zero in on specific aspects of birds wing beats using high speed cameras as well as motion capture techniques more commonly utilized in Hollywood films recording wing motion millisecond by millisecond They then translate these measurements to precise calculations of the force dynamics experienced along the birds wings and in the surrounding air Later this summer Lentink expects to introduce two fluoroscopes to the mix which will allow researchers to see inside the bird and visualize the exact muscular skeletal movements it makes in different flight maneuvers Once his team has trained enough birds Lentink plans to fly entire flocks in the tunnel to determine how turbulence created by one bird s wing beats affects a nearby bird and how they maneuver for position Both of these measurements will provide critical foundational information for a future sky packed with

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/print/node/38721 (2016-04-27)
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  • Next-Generation Wind Energy - John Dabiri
    produce 2 to 3 watts of power per square meter of the wind farm footprint full scale field tests over the past five years have demonstrated that 10x increases in wind farm footprint power density can be achieved by arranging vertical axis wind turbines in layouts inspired by the configurations of schooling fish and seagrass beds Opportunities for near term application of this technology will be discussed as will remaining challenges for wide scale implementation of this approach to wind energy John Dabiri is a professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford and a 2010 MacArthur Fellow He was formerly a professor of Aeronautics and Bioengineering at Caltech He graduated from Princeton University with a BSE degree summa cum laude in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering in 2001 He came to Caltech as a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellow Gordon and Betty Moore Fellow and Y C Fung Fellow in Bioengineering earning an MS degree in Aeronautics in 2003 followed by a PhD in Bioengineering with a minor in Aeronautics in 2005 He subsequently joined the Caltech faculty His honors include an Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award and a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/print/node/38663 (2016-04-27)
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  • Professional Development and Continuing Education
    in a guided curriculum of study and earn a graduate certificate as evidence of in depth subject specific knowledge Professional Certificates Complete 3 6 short intensive courses and earn professional certification in areas such as advanced project management advanced computer security or sustainability To accommodate your busy life all courses required for a professional certificate are online and self paced Some courses are also held on the Stanford campus or can be delivered at your work site Visit our professional certificates page to learn more Master s Degrees Pursue a Stanford University MS degree on a part time basis through the Honors Cooperative Program HCP As an Honors Coop student you will be a fully matriculated graduate student of Stanford University Complete 45 quarter units of master s degree study in five years or less Pursue your degree from anywhere in the world and connect to the world class community of Stanford University Application deadlines vary by department Visit our master s degree page for application information Lifelong Learning Staying in the forefront of engineering requires a program of lifelong learning Stanford Engineering offers numerous opportunities for alumni and others to stay on top of their careers ranging from free

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/print/node/36854 (2016-04-27)
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  • Online Learning
    the potential to expand offerings for Stanford students who are away from campus for a quarter at an overseas study location For students at other colleges and universities Another avenue is sharing licensed online coursework with other colleges and universities These can be full courses or in many cases shorter modules For instance a computer science course at one university could incorporate an online module on cryptography or database design taught by a world class expert in that specialty at another university For MOOC students Stanford faculty are continuing to put some courses online broadly available to the public as part of Stanford s interest in expanding educational access everywhere MOOCs cannot replicate the quality of the on campus Stanford experience but they can incorporate variations of some on campus features into the online environment such as discussions sections and office hours The MOOCs also serve as a large scale laboratory for evaluating teaching methods and student learning patterns Stanford s MOOC offerings are listed each quarter on the Stanford Online website Stanford Online The vision of Stanford Online is to continue Stanford s leadership in providing high quality educational experiences to its students and to people around the world

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/print/node/36855 (2016-04-27)
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