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  • ​Ada Poon: How miniaturized electronic devices can be used as medical therapeutics | Engineering
    the lack of active control and response to feedback Once the infusion or pill goes into the patient s body all the doctor can do is wait and watch and perhaps adjust the dose or the frequency These therapies can t self regulate based on feedback from the body in order to increase or decrease their effects in accordance with the patient s needs Adding control and feedback are what electrical engineers are good at Electronic devices Poon knew could be programmed to respond to the body s feedback and modulate their own effects after being implanted in the body thus offering the potential for a closed loop system that could improve therapeutic outcomes Researchers have come up with a term for this emerging category of devices electroceuticals But when Poon started her research it was easier to say electroceutical than it was to build one Size was a problem Pacemakers cochlear implants and other devices designed to work in the human body were too bulky to work locally on say nerve fibers Power was an even bigger obstacle to creating electroceuticals Engineers already knew how to miniaturize the electronics in any device But batteries were difficult to shrink and running wires from the outside of the body to a device implanted within would be risky and impractical Wireless power transfer technologies did exist for uses such as the electric toothbrush But wireless power transfer to a miniaturized medical device implanted deep inside the body seemed impossible The prevailing assumption was that the efficiency would be too low to be practical Both Poon s education in information theory and mathematics and her work experience in wireless communications pushed her to reject the assumptions that had held back the development of electronic medical devices That s what I think engineering is about Poon says There are certain needs and we expand our skill set to solve the problem Over a period of several years working alongside biologists in an interdisciplinary setting Poon started from scratch and discovered how to safely and efficiently beam electromagnetic energy into the body This has enabled her team to create tiny electronic devices that can be wirelessly powered or recharged from outside the body One minuscule prototype is designed to swim through a patient s circulatory system to deliver drugs or perform tests Another is a pacemaker smaller than a grain of rice It can be recharged when necessary by holding a credit card sized power transmitter up to the chest Currently Poon is helping to design a wireless biosensor that could continuously monitor the drug concentration in the bloodstream of chemotherapy patients so that the dose can be self regulated and save patients from excessive exposure to the toxic chemicals Poon credits these achievements to the fact that researchers from many fields feel comfortable working together We can start to solve this kind of problem because we re of the generation that accepts multidisciplinary thinking she says Poon recently outlined one of her new research

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/news/%E2%80%8Bada-poon-how-miniaturized-electronic-devices-can-be-used-medical-therapeutics (2016-04-27)
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  • ​Zhenan Bao: On a quest to develop artificial skin | Engineering
    that if we are successful will really benefit people she says Since coming to Stanford Bao has worked with her research team to discover new materials and sensory technologies that replicate different aspects of human skin including flexibility stretchability self healing biodegradability and sensitivity to pressure The ultimate application of Bao s vision would be covering a prosthetic limb with a sheet of electronic sensors that act like human skin and allow an amputee to feel everything from a child s kiss to a hot pot handle To achieve this the material would need the physical characteristics of skin sensors that mimic the many different types of nerves in skin flexible circuitry to carry electronic signals from the sensors and a technology to translate this electronic sensory information into the equivalent of nerve impulses understood by the brain All of this is difficult Today s electronic materials are rigid They don t bend or stretch And even after creating flexible electronics the challenge remains of creating an interface between electronic circuits and biological nerves To put a piece of synthetic material onto the body and allow it to actually communicate with the brain requires breakthroughs in many different areas Bao says Her lab has made a start Its most advanced material can mimic human skin s pressure sensing capability and generate electrical pulses that our brain would understand Her team is striving to add other sensations and temperature sensitivities to enable the artificial skin to sense everything that human skin can feel She is collaborating with neurosurgeons and neuroscientists on how to make the electronic to biological connection Despite the complexity of the project she is optimistic that an early version of prosthetic skin could be tested in just a few years On the way toward that ambitious goal of creating skin like coverings for prosthetics Bao believes her smart flexible electronics could create products more useful than the plastic wristbands in use today Flexible electronics that provide intimate contact with human bodies allow us to potentially extract more accurate information about health conditions she explains This would provide information that people actually care about blood pressure for example or glucose levels or the chemicals that may be generated in sweat that are related to stress Already her team is developing a prototype bandage like wearable blood pressure sensor that could comfortably provide continuous monitoring for patients with cardiovascular problems In addition to this bandage model Bao imagines designing flexible electronics into clothing fabric At the same time she is exploring the use of biocompatible electronics as subdermal implants Think about these as electronics devices that you can wear inside the body she says At a recent conference for Stanford s SystemX Alliance which brings together industrial and academic researchers Bao described one such concept a smart flexible device that could be installed on the heart of a patient suffering from arrhythmia to provide doctors with a record of the irregular current flows that cause the problem Another subdermal application

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/news/%E2%80%8Bzhenan-bao-quest-develop-artificial-skin (2016-04-27)
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  • How effective data visualizations let users have a conversation with data | Engineering
    engaging When a user enjoys interactively exploring your data they are more likely to understand and appreciate it says Deriso Previously complex 3D visualizations required specialized applications and high performance computers Recent advances in browser based 3D graphics powered by WebGL have enabled these sophisticated scientific visualizations to be made available online Web interfaces also allow these visualizations to become compelling interactive experiences In this example a WebGL library called Three js powers a sophisticated MRI image of a brain in 3D with several layers of information overlaid Animation features of the library allow the brain to smoothly morph into different representations from a standard brain to a flat map like view A 2D plot on the right serves as an interface for displaying different data sets collected from the study while simultaneously serving as a visual depiction of the results of the experiment This was a wonderful neuroscience experiment and the visualization made it quite popular among neuroscientists explains Deriso You used to only see images of the brain printed in the research article but now you could share the entire dataset view it and interact with it all from one link Deriso also discussed how these tools could be ported to immersive virtual reality platforms such as Google Cardboard and Oculus Rift If you happen to have a Google Cardboard handy here is an example of a visualization where you are standing in the middle of a room while an algorithm computes a simulation of birds flocking around you Deriso believes interactive web based 2D 3D and VR will be the future of data visualization It s important to understand what kind of visual will allow for the best representation of data Well designed visuals allow readers to easily understand a lot of quantitative data at once Unfortunately poorly designed visuals are everywhere in reports magazines books on TV and the internet Using computer vision and machine learning two processes that attempt to duplicate the abilities of human vision by electronically perceiving and understanding an image Agrawala s research focuses on figuring out how to let machines access the wealth of information locked inside of charts and graphs so that ultimately visuals can be redesigned to be more accurate and also easier to understand Well designed visuals make it easy for readers to extract important information quickly The National Institutes of Health NIH pie chart below was created to show the percentage of budget devoted to research for various diseases in 2005 A reader can easily see from this pie chart that AIDS research takes up the largest percentage of the 2005 budget But it isn t as easy to determine if NIH dedicated more budget to diabetes or Alzheimer s the sizes of those pie slices are very similar to one another In this case while a pie chart does communicate some data it s not effectively designed to allow an audience to understand all of the data Source Maneesh Agrawala Redesigning Reusing and Revitalizing Charts and

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/news/how-effective-data-visualizations-let-users-have-conversation-data (2016-04-27)
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  • ​Shan Wang: How magnetic nanoparticles can be used as medical sensors | Engineering
    10 million Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE by helping create a Star Trek style device that would diagnose or check 18 diseases and vital signs through minimally invasive methods The Wang Group s part of the project which could net them just over a million dollars in prize money is to use giant magnetoresistance GMR biosensors to screen for HIV mononucleosis and anemia Wang s lab has already shown that GMR which involves using nanoparticles to mark a protein antibody or even a bit of DNA can be used to create diagnostics that are more sensitive and faster than existing tests for cancer and other conditions Along with Dr Sam So the director of Asian Liver Center at Stanford School of Medicine they re refining a mobile hepatitis B test that using a smartphone as a processor could help battle this major public health threat in East Asia and Africa The lab s original mobile hepatitis B test which won the Nokia Sensing XCHALLENGE in 2014 used GMR to find hepatitis B antibodies in the blood A new test funded by a grant from the Center for Innovation in Global Health where Wang is a senior fellow will screen for four hepatitis B related proteins resulting in a test that Wang says is more powerful more accurate and gives doctors more actionable information Wang is collaborating with Stanford University School of Medicine to search for biomarkers in the bloodstreams of cancer patients in order to create new tests that would detect tumors earlier monitor how cancer patients respond to treatment and distinguish between indolent and aggressive tumors Separately Wang and his students are pushing for advances in spintronics a nano based form of data storage power management for computing and creating a sensor network for drones Although Wang says he is equally passionate about all of his research projects he understands that using nanosensors to detect cancer and other dire diseases stirs a much greater public response than creating more efficient data storage In 2009 for instance after the publication of his first paper on the potential use of nanosensors in cancer detection members of the general public started calling his office something that had never happened before One person called me and said My relative is going to have a colonoscopy He wants to avoid this invasive procedure Can we send a blood sample to your lab to do this test Wang of course had to explain that without approval from the Food and Drug Administration he couldn t throw open his lab doors and offer nanoparticle cancer screenings to the public However in the years since that notion has come closer to reality MagArray Inc a company co founded by Wang is in the validation stage of commercializing a cancer assay using magneto nanosensor technology developed in his lab Wang has also noticed that the medical aspects of his work including cancer detection are a hit with his family It is very easy to explain to my kids and my

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/news/%E2%80%8Bshan-wang-how-magnetic-nanoparticles-can-be-used-medical-sensors (2016-04-27)
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  • News & Updates | Engineering
    a polymer that can stretch to 100 times its original length and even repair itself if punctured Read More Can computer science help light up the world with knowledge Thursday April 14 2016 A team of engineers and scientists develop tools to create more Wikipedia articles in more languages Read More John Hennessy Great leadership can be learned Wednesday April 13 2016 Stanford University President John Hennessy offers his take on important leadership qualities Silicon Valley and the future of higher education Read More Ada Poon How miniaturized electronic devices can be used as medical therapeutics Tuesday April 12 2016 Inspired by personal experience an engineer pioneers the development of electroceuticals that can dispense treatments or monitor functions deep inside the body Read More Shan Wang How magnetic nanoparticles can be used as medical sensors Tuesday April 12 2016 A team of researchers tracks disease the way naturalists track animals in the wild Read More How could we use the tiniest specs of diamonds Monday April 11 2016 Extracting nanodiamonds from crude oil could help produce next generation tools for imaging and communications Read More Meet the Makers Tuesday April 5 2016 In the Stanford Product Realization Lab students get back in touch with the process of making and building things Read More Kathleen Eisenhardt Simplifying makes teams more effective Tuesday April 5 2016 A professor of management science and engineering says following a simple set of rules can help bring clarity to chaos Read More How do we prevent cancer s spread Friday April 1 2016 A team of researchers develop an experimental therapy to treat metastatic cancer Read More James Freeman Subtle notes of coffee and philosophy Friday April 1 2016 Blue Bottle CEO James Freeman draws on his former life as a musician and his love of philosophy to deliver a unique coffee experience Read More What will the batteries and electronics of the future look like Thursday March 31 2016 A team of researchers peer deep into materials with ultrafast science Read More Could a new catalyst use sunlight to efficiently extract hydrogen from water Thursday March 31 2016 Hydrogen powered vehicles offer a clean alternative to running cars with fossil fuels This chemical engineering discovery brings that closer to reality Read More Minnie Ingersoll A drive to disrupt Wednesday March 30 2016 Shift COO Minnie Ingersoll explains how the company is bringing trust and simplicity to the used car market Read More Harnessing big data to better understand what happens when we mix drugs Friday March 25 2016 Bioengineering Professor Russ Altman mines patient data to discover unreported side effects of drugs and paves a path to future medical breakthroughs Read More Michael Tubbs Solving social ills through innovation Friday March 25 2016 Stockton city councilmember and Stanford alum Michael Tubbs argues for a people centric view of problem solving Read More Federica Marchionni Adaptability is key to staying ahead of the curve Friday March 25 2016 The CEO of clothing retailer Lands End discusses

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/about/news (2016-04-27)
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  • What Matters to Me & Why - Sidney and Persis Drell | Engineering
    father and daughter Sidney and Persis Drell Sidney Drell Professor and Deputy Director at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Emeritus and Senior Fellow by courtesy at the Hoover Institution Sidney D Drell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and a professor of theoretical physics emeritus at Stanford s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory where he served as deputy director until retiring in 1998 An arms control specialist he has advised the executive and legislative branches of government on national security and technical defense issues for more than five decades From 1983 to 1989 he was the founding codirector of Stanford s Center for International Security and Arms Control Persis Drell Frederick Emmons Terman Dean of the Stanford School of Engineering the James and Anna Marie Spilker Professor in the School of Engineering and a professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Physics Dean Persis Drell who assumed her current post in September 2014 has been on the faculty at Stanford since 2002 and was director of the 1 600 employee U S Department of Energy SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory from 2007 to 2012 Her research interests are in technology development for free electron lasers and particle astrophysics She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is a fellow of the American Physical Society Dean Drell has been the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and a National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award She received her bachelor s degree in mathematics and physics from Wellesley College and her doctorate in atomic physics from the University of California Berkeley Date Time Wednesday May 4 2016 12 00 pm 1 00 pm Location Common Room Center for Inter Religious Community Learning and Experiences CIRCLE Old Union 3rd Floor

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/event/what-matters-me-why-sidney-persis-drell (2016-04-27)
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  • EXPE 2016 : The Stanford Design EXPErience | Engineering
    Faculty Admissions Education Collaborations EXPE 2016 The Stanford Design EXPErience Home About Events EXPE 2016 The Stanford Design EXPErience Thursday June 2 2016 Location TBD Podium presentations project fair Stanford s Mechanical Engineering Design Group invites you to join us as we celebrate our students creative work in design research design practice engineering and manufacturing The Stanford Design EXPErience is a unique once a year opportunity to meet with students faculty and industry colleagues This year brings you an expansive range of participating courses faculty and students from a broad cross section of design thinking activities at Stanford Event Sponsor Mechanical Engineering Design Group More Information EXPE The Stanford DesignEXPErience Research Theme Research Theme Design Date Time Thursday June 2 2016 9 00 am 6 00 pm Sponsors Mechanical Engineering Design Group Admission Free open to the public URL More info Last modified Fri 19 Feb 2016 at 17 34 Printer friendly version Alumni Current students Faculty Prospective students Staff Mechanical Engineering Engineering News How the shape and structure of nanoparticles affects energy storage A team of engineers obtain a first look inside phase changing nanoparticles and find that their Read More A one of a kind wind tunnel for

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/event/expe-2016-stanford-design-experience (2016-04-27)
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  • Contact Us | Engineering
    Alumni Companies Faculty Staff Departments Aeronautics and Astronautics Bioengineering Chemical Engineering Civil Environmental Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Management Science Engineering Materials Science Engineering Mechanical Engineering Institutes Hasso Plattner Institute of Design Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment Search this site Primary links About Research Faculty Admissions Education Collaborations Contact Us Home Contact Us Please visit the Engineering Admissions site for information on applying to Stanford Engineering We are unable to respond to individual requests for admissions and financial aid Report Accessibility Issues Name Other contact info if you d like is to contact you some other way phone etc Email address How can we contact you Type of issue Select I m having trouble finding something on the site I need to correct some information on the site I have a question about the site that s not answered here There s a page link feature that doesn t work on your site I have another issue Please categorize your issue so we can better route it to someone who can answer it quickly Issue Type your issue or comment here verification Type the characters you see in

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/contact-us (2016-04-27)
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