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  • Visit Stanford Engineering | Engineering
    Primary links About Research Faculty Admissions Education Collaborations Visit Stanford Engineering Home Visit View Larger Map Stanford Engineering is centered in the Science and Engineering Quad to the west of Stanford s historic Main Quad and the Oval Designed by Boora Architects to meet the needs of 21st century teaching research and sustainability the new buildings set a modern tone that looks forward as it recalls the legacy of Stanford s original sandstone facades and arch lined arcades The Jen Hsun Huang Engineering Center with its octagonal rotunda occupies the SEQ in the southeast corner In the southwest corner is the Jerry Yang and Akiko Yamazaki Environment and Energy Building also known as Y2E2 In the northeast corner is the The James and Anna Marie Spilker Engineering and Applied Sciences Building The final building completed in 2014 is the Shriram Center for Bioengineering Chemical Engineering The Dean s Office and Administration are located in the Jen Hsun Huang Engineering Center 475 Via Ortega map of area Stanford CA 94305 4121 The school occupies many buildings in and around the Quad Stop by our campus to embark on a self guided tour or spend an hour with a student guide exploring

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/visit (2016-04-27)
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  • Give to Stanford Engineering | Engineering
    Stanford Engineering Home Give The generous support of individual and corporate donors is critical to our success Collaboration and partnerships among faculty alumni and industry have been central to our long history of innovation and learning Whether you wish to make an annual gift are considering an endowed gift or wish discuss your estate plans we will strive to make your experience as rewarding as possible Gifts of any size are welcome because they add up to make a tangible difference to people throughout the school Stanford Engineering Funding Priorities Endowed Professorships A chaired professorship is the most significant honor the university can offer to faculty Holders of endowed chairs represent the most distinguished scholars of their generation Those selected for a chair combine brilliant scholarship inspirational teaching and leadership service to the school and university A gift of 4 million provides an endowment that will support a new chair in selected priority departments Graduate Fellowships The university s mission of excellence in teaching learning and research is fully embodied in its graduate students Fellowships are key to our ability to attract the most talented graduate students The primary criteria for admission are superior academic achievement and a potential to contribute to the academic and professional communities The competition particularly at the PhD level is intense and only the top candidates in each department are admitted Once admitted the very best students are offered financial support that usually comprises a combination of tuition stipend and teaching or research assistantships A 1 2 million endowment provides annual income equal to a graduate student s annual tuition costs A donor s gift of 800 000 will be matched by the school with 400 000 Fellowship gifts of 250 000 create endowments that provide partial annual support for an engineering graduate student Corporate

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/give (2016-04-27)
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  • Emergency Information | Engineering
    For Students Alumni Companies Faculty Staff Departments Aeronautics and Astronautics Bioengineering Chemical Engineering Civil Environmental Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Management Science Engineering Materials Science Engineering Mechanical Engineering Institutes Hasso Plattner Institute of Design Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment Search this site Primary links About Research Faculty Admissions Education Collaborations Emergency Information Home Emergency Information Emergency fire police medical aid Cell phone 911 Campus phone 9 911 Campus phone at School of Medicine 286 Hazardous materials incident Environmental Health Safety 650 725 9999 Up to date information about an emergency University emergency website School of Engineering hotline recording 650 725 1619 University hotline recording 650 725 5555 Counseling Sexual assault help 650 725 9955 General help center 650 723 4577 Non emergency situations SoE Facilities Operations business hours for maintenance issues 650 996 0531 After hours Campus Facilities Operations 24 7 for lock outs leaks etc 650 723 2281 Network Support no internet Stanford Help Request System Emergency Assembly Points Occupants of evacuated buildings are to report to an Emergency Assembly Point EAP identified by a encircled triangle Emergency Assembly Points Quick Action Sheets To prepre for the

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/portals/faculty-staff/facilities-planning-management/emergencies (2016-04-27)
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  • Stanford, Toyota to collaborate on AI research effort | Engineering
    in various ways The Stanford School of Engineering has a strong track record of leading innovation in artificial intelligence said Persis Drell dean of Stanford School of Engineering This support will enable us to expand our research in human centered AI and innovate solutions to some of the world s most pressing challenges The collaboration builds on decades of leading edge AI research conducted at Stanford In the 1960s the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Lab or SAIL built some of the first chess playing computers and by the 1970s the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Language was one of the predominant tools for programming AI platforms More recently Stanford researchers have built systems that have aced several autonomous driving competitions Early on the new effort will focus on AI assisted driving This is in part because of an obvious need according to the World Health Organization 3 400 people die a day due to automobile related accidents but also because it is a particularly good challenge for developing AI methodologies and platforms AI assisted driving is a perfect platform for advancing fundamental human centric artificial intelligence research while also producing practical applications said Fei Fei Li an associate professor of computer science at Stanford director of SAIL and the director of the new AI center Autonomous driving provides a scenario where AI can deliver smart tools for assistance in decision making and planning to human drivers Fei Fei Li associate professor of computer science and director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Lab will direct the new SAIL Toyota Center for AI Research Credit L A Cicero Driving might seem like a simple task but that s in large part because the human brain is remarkably good at collecting visual information figuring out what s important and then making snap behavioral decisions all while staying within the framework of traffic laws The brain performs this task nonstop but the moment attention wanders to text messaging adjusting the radio or chatting with passengers opens the door to accidents Mimicking the brain s performance in an ever changing environment makes autonomous driving one of the benchmark tasks for AI even more so considering the life saving potential of the application Li a world renowned expert in computer vision said that Stanford will tackle the problem by addressing four main challenges of making a computer think like a person perception learning reasoning and interaction Stanford s computer scientists will train computers to recognize objects and speech as well as data and then use machine learning and statistical modeling to extract the meaningful data points for instance a swerving car versus a parked one Other researchers will teach the AI platform to look at this critical data set and plot the safest driving action The first cars with AI technology will work as partners with the driver to make safe decisions Li said so devising ways to carefully and comfortably share control between the human and the computer will be instrumental in this technology gaining the public s

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/research-profile/stanford-toyota-collaborate-ai-research-effort-0 (2016-04-27)
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  • Most sensors designed to measure head impacts in sports produce inaccurate data, Stanford bioengineers find | Engineering
    mouthguard A test subject wore the sensors while heading a soccer ball traveling at speeds roughly equivalent to those observed in youth soccer The researchers used high speed cameras to record how the subject s head moved during impact and compared that camera data to measurements produced by the sensors The subject also wore a sensor deep in his ear canal that provided a reference for skull movement The mouthguard which is used by Stanford s football team displaced less than 1 millimeter compared with the video measurement within the estimated error The skin patch and skull cap sensors however fared significantly worse moving 4 mm and 13 mm respectively The additional movement caused these two devices to overpredict the acceleration of impact by up to 500 percent an error that could make it difficult to study the cause of injury Stanford researchers used high speed cameras to record how the subject s head moved during impact and compared that camera data to measurements produced by concussion sensors Video Camarillo Lab If these devices over predicted consistently say they were always 50 percent over then it s probably not a huge issue said Lyndia Wu a graduate student in Camarillo s lab and the lead author on the new study But the problem is that they don t correlate with skull motion which makes it difficult to interpret their measurements and in turn makes it difficult to interpret injury risk predictions High sensor accelerations measured from the skin apparel motion might trigger false positive warnings when in fact no concussion occurred Camarillo said False positives are not an unknown to medical technology and can have widespread consequences Camarillo cited mammographies and prostate cancer screenings as examples of widely used clinical tests that scientists are only now learning produce many false positives which steer people to costly and time consuming medical treatment Without better sensor equipment and protocols the same could happen to concussions Across the country all states have passed some version of concussion legislation that requires medical professionals to evaluate and sign off on child athletes suspected of a concussion Camarillo said You can see how this would cause a problem if there are too many false positives and kids being pulled out of play A clinical tool to aid in diagnosis needs to be validated for some degree of sensitivity and specificity but at this stage we need to do the research first The researchers found a simple reason for the discrepancies Skin is flexible and the momentum of the impact moved the sensor past the point of the actual skull movement Similarly the skull cap didn t fit tightly and slid during impact These two sensors also inaccurately registered the direction of the force which Camarillo s group has previously found to be an important factor in predicting injury The experiment was relatively simple and the impacts were mild compared with actual sports the researchers acknowledged but the results should give a general sense of how well

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/news/most-sensors-designed-measure-head-impacts-sports-produce-inaccurate-data-stanford-bioengineers (2016-04-27)
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  • Stanford engineers find secret to steady drone cameras in swan necks | Engineering
    of the Royal Society Interface has influenced the researchers design of a camera suspension system that could allow drones to record steadier video All birds have built in vision stabilization to compensate for the up and down body motion caused by flapping their wings in flight Scientists have studied the neck morphology and head motions of walking or stationary birds but measuring the mechanism in flight has not been successful until now David Lentink an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford and his colleagues devised a method for comparing high speed video data of a whooper swan flying over a lake with a computer model that approximated the springy damping effects of the bird s neck that allow it to stabilize the vertical disturbances They found that the neck functions much like how a car s suspension system provides a smooth ride over a bumpy road The neck vertebrae and muscles respond with just the right stiffness and flexibility to passively keep the head steady during flapping flight and even in mild gusts This simple mechanism is a remarkable finding considering the daunting complexity of avian neck morphology with about 20 vertebrae and more than 200 muscles on each side said Lentink the senior author on the study Lentink credits much of the work to a former master s student Ashley Pete who graduated this past spring and is first author on the study She developed the idea and methodology for the study in Lentink s class ME 303 Biomechanics of Flight The paper she wrote for this class was so good that we expanded it together and submitted it to Interface where it got published Lentink said This really shows students can make remarkable discoveries in the classroom going beyond textbooks based on their creativity and enthusiasm The

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/news/stanford-engineers-find-secret-steady-drone-cameras-swan-necks (2016-04-27)
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  • Microscopic Rake Doubles Efficiency of Low-cost Solar Cells | Engineering
    With Polymers Although prices for silicon based solar cells are dropping it still takes five to 15 years before they produce enough electricity to offset their purchase and installation Silicon solar cells also require a large amount of energy to manufacture which partly offsets their value as renewable energy sources Polymer based photovoltaic cells are much cheaper because they re made of inexpensive materials that can be simply painted or printed in place They are also flexible and require little energy to manufacture While small lab scale samples can convert more than 10 percent of sunlight into electricity the large area coated cells have very low efficiency typically converting less than 5 percent compared with 20 25 percent for commercial silicon based cells Polymer cells typically combine two types of polymers A donor which converts sunlight into electrons and an acceptor which stores the electrons until they can be removed from the cell as usable electricity But when this mixture is deposited on a cell s conducting surface during manufacturing the two types tend to separate as they dry into an irregular assortment of large clumps making it more difficult for the cell to produce and harvest electrons The SLAC Stanford researchers solution is a manufacturing technique called fluid enhanced crystal engineering or FLUENCE which was originally developed to improve the electrical conduction of organic semiconductors In the current work as the polymers are painted onto a conducting surface they are forced through a slightly angled rake containing several rows of stiff microscopic pillars The rake is scraped along the surface at the relatively slow speed of 25 100 micrometers per second which translates to 3 5 14 2 inches per hour The large polymer molecules untangle and mix with each other as they bounce off and flow past the pillars ultimately drying into tiny nanometer sized crystals of uniform size with enhanced electrical properties Simulations and X rays The researchers used computer simulations and X ray analyses at two DOE Office of Science User Facilities SLAC s Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SSRL and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory s Advanced Light Source ALS to customize the FLUENCE rake for making solar cells At SSRL the team used X ray diffraction to measure the degree to which the polymers formed crystals and X ray scattering to determine how clearly the two polymers segregated themselves said Mike Toney SSRL Materials Sciences group leader and a co author on the paper These are bread and butter techniques for which we ve developed some novel approaches at SSRL in recent years To achieve the polymer patterns they wanted for the solar cells the researchers made the pillars in the rake much shorter and more densely packed than those used earlier for organic semiconductors They were 1 5 micrometers high and 1 2 micrometers apart for comparison a human hair is about 100 micrometers in diameter Close But Not Too Close Ideally the two types of photovoltaic polymers should be close enough to each other

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/research-profile/microscopic-rake-doubles-efficiency-low-cost-solar-cells (2016-04-27)
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  • Stanford Engineering Alumni
    the Bay Area 6 198 Engineering alumni outside the United States 850 Estimated number of engineering alumni who have founded companies Stay Connected Alumni eNews Subscribe to the monthly alumni e mail for updates on the faculty research school news alumni events and professional development To subscribe simply update your email address with the Stanford Alumni Association Non engineering Stanford alumni can subscribe by sending an email to engineering alumni

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/print/node/36370 (2016-04-27)
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