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  • Alumni Career Resources | Engineering
    Hasso Plattner Institute of Design Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering Wellspring of Innovation Info For Students Alumni Companies Faculty Staff Departments Aeronautics and Astronautics Bioengineering Chemical Engineering Civil Environmental Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Management Science Engineering Materials Science Engineering Mechanical Engineering Institutes Hasso Plattner Institute of Design Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment Search this site Primary links About Research Faculty Admissions Education Collaborations Alumni Career Resources Home Alumni Alumni Career Resources Put the power of the university and thousands of Stanford alums to work for your career development Use a job board or attend a career fair exclusive to School of Engineering alumni or access the full complement of Stanford services through the Stanford Career Education site Stanford Alumni Job Board This job board available only to alumni complements the BEAM Stanford Career Education site Use the same username and password to access both Stanford Engineering Alumni Career Fair The Stanford Engineering Alumni career fair held every September attracts some 90 employers all in search of experienced professionals No registration is required for alumni Companies may register here Alternately see the schedule of all Stanford career fairs

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/portals/alumni/alumni-career-resources (2016-04-27)
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  • Your Department News - The Year in Review | Engineering
    Technology Ventures Program Hasso Plattner Institute of Design Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering Wellspring of Innovation Info For Students Alumni Companies Faculty Staff Departments Aeronautics and Astronautics Bioengineering Chemical Engineering Civil Environmental Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Management Science Engineering Materials Science Engineering Mechanical Engineering Institutes Hasso Plattner Institute of Design Institute for Computational Mathematical Engineering Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment Search this site Primary links About Research Faculty Admissions Education Collaborations Your Department News The Year in Review Home Give Annual Giving Your Department News As always there is a tremendous amount of exciting research going on in the School of Engineering Find out what s happening in all our departments Aero Astro Bioengineering Chemical Engineering Read the Aero Astro letter Bioengineering news ChemE news Civil Environmental Computer Science Electrical Engineering Read the CEE letter READ the CS letter Read the EE letter Management Science Engineering Materials Science Engineering Mechanical Engineering Read the MS E letter MSE news Read the ME letter Questions Please contact Suzanne Morze Annual Fund Manager suzanne morze stanford edu Printer friendly version Annual Giving Report on Annual Giving 5 Reasons to Support Stanford Your Department News Docs

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/give/annual-giving/dept-letters (2016-04-27)
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  • How the shape and structure of nanoparticles affects energy storage | Engineering
    materials but could eventually find its way into data storage electronic switches and any device in which the phase transformation of a material regulates its performance For instance in a lithium ion battery the ability of the battery to store and release energy repeatedly relies on the electrode s ability to sustain large deformations over several charge and discharge cycles without degrading Recently scientists have improved the efficiency of this process by nanosizing the electrodes The nanoparticles allow for faster charging increased energy storage and an extended lifetime but it is unknown which nanoparticle shapes sizes and crystallinities produce the best performance Addressing this question served as inspiration for the present study Reconstructing solute induced phase transformations within individual nanocrystals Generally it is difficult to determine whether the behavior of a collection of nanoparticles is the result of each individual component performing similarly or if it is the average output of high and low performers Jennifer Dionne an assistant professor of materials science and engineering and her group have been studying the behavior of individual particles to establish a stronger link between structure and function that can direct the design of next generation energy storage materials In this experiment Dionne s group examined how varying the shapes and crystallinity of palladium nanoparticles affected their ability to absorb and release hydrogen atoms an analog to a lithium ion battery discharging and charging They prepared cubic pyramidal and icosahedral 20 sided nanoparticles and developed novel imaging techniques to look inside nanoparticles at various hydrogen pressures determining where the hydrogen was located The technique relied on an environmental transmission electron microscope allowing the engineers to discern exactly how the hydrogen was distributed within the nanoparticles and to do so with incredibly high sub 2 nanometer resolution This instrument is one of only a handful of its kind and allows us to study materials in their working environment said Tarun Narayan lead co author of the study and a recent PhD graduate from Dionne s group The microscope enables analysis of particles using several different techniques such as direct imaging diffraction and spectroscopy Each technique offers different information that can be combined to gain a complete multi dimensional understanding of the system said Andrea Baldi a postdoctoral co author and now a faculty member at the Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research DIFFER in the Netherlands The researchers found that nanoparticle structure significantly influences performance The icosahedral structures for instance show reduced energy storage capacity and more gradual hydrogen absorption than the single crystalline cubes and pyramids High resolution maps of the particles demonstrate that hydrogen is excluded from the center of the particle thus lowering the overall capacity to incorporate hydrogen Structural characterization shows that the gradual absorption of hydrogen occurs because different regions of the particle absorb hydrogen at different pressures unlike what is observed in single crystals We could not have envisaged making in situ observations like this at the atomic level even a few years ago and so what the

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/news/how-shape-structure-nanoparticles-affects-energy-storage (2016-04-27)
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  • A one-of-a-kind wind tunnel for birds paves the way for better drones | Engineering
    something we haven t accomplished in robotics yet We need to study birds up close so we can figure out what their secret is to flying so stably under such difficult conditions and apply that to aerial robotic design The new wind tunnel works like a super tricked out treadmill for birds The windflow generated by a fan roughly the size of a Volkswagen Beetle is super smooth Turbulence checks in around 015 percent less than half of any other bird wind tunnel in the world This allows the researchers to study how birds fly in smooth flowing air such as that found at higher altitudes Such conditions aren t typical closer to the ground particularly around trees and buildings though so the tunnel is fitted with a turbulence generating system a series of computer controlled wind vanes that can precisely simulate different turbulence patterns creating up to 50 percent turbulence In this state the flow moves almost equally randomly in all directions making it very unpredictable for the bird Cruising speed for birds Wind speed is also highly tunable The lovebirds parrotlets and hummingbirds that Lentink s lab studies typically cruise around 7 meters second which the engineers can match perfectly to study sustained flight They will occasionally crank the flow up to 15 m s which simulates a strong wind maxing out at 20 m s for large birds Lentink is fiercely protective of his birds and said this would be the maximum speed he would consider letting larger birds fly to keep them comfortable The tunnel can blow much faster however with speeds up to 50 m s for the prototype drones he plans to test in the tunnel Nearly two meters long the six sided windowed observation section of the tunnel provides Lentink and his students a variety of ways to study bird flight They currently zero in on specific aspects of birds wing beats using high speed cameras as well as motion capture techniques more commonly utilized in Hollywood films recording wing motion millisecond by millisecond They then translate these measurements to precise calculations of the force dynamics experienced along the birds wings and in the surrounding air Later this summer Lentink expects to introduce two fluoroscopes to the mix which will allow researchers to see inside the bird and visualize the exact muscular skeletal movements it makes in different flight maneuvers Once his team has trained enough birds Lentink plans to fly entire flocks in the tunnel to determine how turbulence created by one bird s wing beats affects a nearby bird and how they maneuver for position Both of these measurements will provide critical foundational information for a future sky packed with drones Using the information gleaned from bird flights Lentink envisions using the tunnel as a test bed for new aerial robot designs In addition to establishing better maneuverability controls for common quadcopter designs he s particularly interested in building bird like winged robots that quickly morph their wing shape in order

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/news/one-kind-wind-tunnel-birds-paves-way-better-drones (2016-04-27)
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  • Next-Generation Wind Energy - John Dabiri | Engineering
    potential to resolve this disconnect by leveraging concepts from unsteady fluid mechanics and biology inspired engineering Whereas wind farms consisting of propeller style turbines produce 2 to 3 watts of power per square meter of the wind farm footprint full scale field tests over the past five years have demonstrated that 10x increases in wind farm footprint power density can be achieved by arranging vertical axis wind turbines in layouts inspired by the configurations of schooling fish and seagrass beds Opportunities for near term application of this technology will be discussed as will remaining challenges for wide scale implementation of this approach to wind energy John Dabiri is a professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford and a 2010 MacArthur Fellow He was formerly a professor of Aeronautics and Bioengineering at Caltech He graduated from Princeton University with a BSE degree summa cum laude in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering in 2001 He came to Caltech as a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellow Gordon and Betty Moore Fellow and Y C Fung Fellow in Bioengineering earning an MS degree in Aeronautics in 2003 followed by a PhD in Bioengineering with a minor in Aeronautics in 2005 He subsequently joined the Caltech faculty His honors include an Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award and a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers PECASE for his research in bio inspired propulsion Popular Science magazine named him one of its Brilliant 10 scientists in 2008 For his research in bio inspired wind energy Bloomberg Businessweek magazine listed him among its Technology Innovators in 2012 and the MIT Technology Review magazine named him one of its 35 innovators under 35 in 2013 In 2014 he was elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society He served as the Chair of

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/event/next-generation-wind-energy-john-dabiri (2016-04-27)
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  • Professional Development and Continuing Education | Engineering
    of faculty in the School of Engineering and related academic departments Qualified individuals may study for master of science degrees on a part time basis pursue graduate certificates and professional certificates take individual graduate courses and professional courses participate in workshops view free online seminars and more Graduate Certificates Earn a Stanford graduate certificate and accelerate your career without immediately committing to a master s degree program If you already have all of the degrees you need a graduate certificate is also a great way to keep your skills and knowledge current in your field Complete 3 to 5 graduate courses in a guided curriculum of study and earn a graduate certificate as evidence of in depth subject specific knowledge Professional Certificates Complete 3 6 short intensive courses and earn professional certification in areas such as advanced project management advanced computer security or sustainability To accommodate your busy life all courses required for a professional certificate are online and self paced Some courses are also held on the Stanford campus or can be delivered at your work site Visit our professional certificates page to learn more Master s Degrees Pursue a Stanford University MS degree on a part time basis through the Honors Cooperative Program HCP As an Honors Coop student you will be a fully matriculated graduate student of Stanford University Complete 45 quarter units of master s degree study in five years or less Pursue your degree from anywhere in the world and connect to the world class community of Stanford University Application deadlines vary by department Visit our master s degree page for application information Lifelong Learning Staying in the forefront of engineering requires a program of lifelong learning Stanford Engineering offers numerous opportunities for alumni and others to stay on top of their careers ranging from

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/education/professional-development-and-continuing-education (2016-04-27)
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  • Online Learning | Engineering
    developed flipped or blended courses for their students This involves videotaping lecture material and asking students to watch it on their own time in advance so that traditional classroom lecture time can be used for more interactive learning The highest quality education still requires this face to face contact between and among students and faculty For off campus students who are registered with Stanford in some way Building on current offerings such as those in the Stanford Center for Professional Development Stanford will continue exploring options for enrolling at a distance students in Stanford academic programs Online learning also has the potential to expand offerings for Stanford students who are away from campus for a quarter at an overseas study location For students at other colleges and universities Another avenue is sharing licensed online coursework with other colleges and universities These can be full courses or in many cases shorter modules For instance a computer science course at one university could incorporate an online module on cryptography or database design taught by a world class expert in that specialty at another university For MOOC students Stanford faculty are continuing to put some courses online broadly available to the public as part of Stanford s interest in expanding educational access everywhere MOOCs cannot replicate the quality of the on campus Stanford experience but they can incorporate variations of some on campus features into the online environment such as discussions sections and office hours The MOOCs also serve as a large scale laboratory for evaluating teaching methods and student learning patterns Stanford s MOOC offerings are listed each quarter on the Stanford Online website Stanford Online The vision of Stanford Online is to continue Stanford s leadership in providing high quality educational experiences to its students and to people around the world

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/education/life-long-learning (2016-04-27)
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  • Study Reports Stanford Alumni Create Nearly $3 trillion in Economic Impact | Engineering
    and faculty have created 39 900 companies since the 1930s which if gathered collectively into an independent nation would constitute the world s 10th largest economy Stanford s history is one of pioneering innovations in research transferring discoveries to the broader community and educating tomorrow s leaders and entrepreneurs said Stanford President John L Hennessy As this study illustrates our faculty students and alumni have had and will continue to have a tremendous impact on the global economy and on improving people s lives Companies founded by Stanford alumni include tech giants like Google Hewlett Packard and Cisco Systems that form the backbone of Silicon Valley as well as a continuing stream of startups that feed the region s innovation pipeline and contribute to its robust economy The people research and ideas of Stanford Engineering have been a catalyst for some of the world s best known companies said James D Plummer the Frederick Emmons Terman Dean of the School of Engineering and the John M Fluke Professor of Electrical Engineering While the findings of the Stanford Innovation Survey are a tribute to the successful entrepreneurial legacy of our community they also provide an inspiration for our students researchers and faculty to fulfill the full promise of science and technology to be the drivers of economic and societal prosperity in the 21st century Although Stanford is best known for its contributions to Silicon Valley the university s stretches beyond high technology to include automaker Tesla Motors financial companies like Charles Schwab and widely recognized consumer brands like Gap Nike Netflix and Trader Joe s Stanford has been the wellspring of some of the most enduring companies of our time said Roelof Botha a partner at Sequoia Capital which funded the study It s been our privilege to partner with alumni like Larry Sergey Jerry David Sandy Len James Jen Hsun Reid and Trip and we will continue to look to Stanford to nurture the next generation of legendary founders In addition to quantifying Stanford s economic impact the report examines Stanford s role in fostering entrepreneurship and describes how the university creates an ecosystem that encourages creativity and entrepreneurship across schools and disciplines It also includes a look at the rise of social innovation at the university estimating that in addition to 39 900 for profit organizations graduates and faculty have created more than 30 000 non profit organizations Among the best known of these is Kiva a microfinance organization The Special Olympics and Acumen Fund which supports entrepreneurs in developing economies Multidisciplinary learning management knowledge and leadership skills are highly relevant to an ever increasing diversity of organizations that strive to solve systemic global problems like health care delivery public education and sustainable development said Garth Saloner Philip H Knight Professor and Dean of the Graduate School of Business Many of these are management challenges at their core Other key findings of the survey include 29 percent of respondents reported being entrepreneurs who founded an organization for profit or

    Original URL path: http://engineering.stanford.edu/press/study-reports-stanford-alumni-create-nearly-3-trillion-economic-impact (2016-04-27)
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