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  • Philippians
    2 The student will need to read the lectures which follow and the text of Philippians in their own translation of the Bible The student will also need to read a commentary on the book of his or her choice Books may be purchased through The Campus Bookstore 3 At the end of the course the student will be required to write an essay on the meaning and message of

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/philintr.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • 2 Peter
    on the book At the end of the course the student will be asked to write a 5 page paper on the meaning and theology of this letter 3 Texts The student will need to read 2 Peter in his or her own Bible as well as the translation ASV found in the course itself The student will also need to read a commentary on 2 Peter of his or

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/2petintr.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • 3 John - Beware the False Teacher!
    read the English text in his or her Bible but the text which will be commented on is the Latin text included in the body of the course 3 Third John is an extremely important book for modern Christianity For that reason it deserves our attention In order to gain the most from the text the student is required to read the english text the Latin text and the Greek

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/3john/3jnintro.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • Revelation I Introduction
    by thousands of Christians for thousands of years It has been interpreted or perhaps better misinterpreted and made to say things that would no doubt horrify John the Seer The book has suffered such misunderstanding for a variety of reasons The primary reason is that many interpreters have failed to take seriously the first verse of the book This verse is the key to the entire text The second reason that the book has been misunderstood is that interpreters have failed to take into account the historical situation of the text One cannot rightly interpret any material if one does not know why and when it was written Now it is an understatement to say that Revelation can be interpreted in a variety of ways some interpret it as a map of the distant future Others see it as a description of the whole of human history There are premillenial interpretations post millenial and a millenial All of these views compete for followers The problem in my view with all these attempts is that they fail to take seriously the first verse which as I have already said is the key to the whole book That is in short the book is an unveiling of Jesus The book is about Jesus Who is he and what has he done That is what the book is about That is what the first verse says Now we must discover the historical situation which gave birth to the book At the end of the first century the Church in certain areas was suffering persecution The emperor was demanding worship and the Christians were refusing to do so In consequence the emperor was killing some and seizing the property of others Here is how it worked In each village and town as well as

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/revintr1.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • Revelation
    by thousands of Christians for thousands of years It has been interpreted or perhaps better misinterpreted and made to say things that would no doubt horrify John the Seer The book has suffered such misunderstanding for a variety of reasons The primary reason is that many interpreters have failed to take seriously the first verse of the book This verse is the key to the entire text The second reason that the book has been misunderstood is that interpreters have failed to take into account the historical situation of the text One cannot rightly interpret any material if one does not know why and when it was written Now it is an understatement to say that Revelation can be interpreted in a variety of ways some interpret it as a map of the distant future Others see it as a description of the whole of human history There are premillenial interpretations post millenial and a millenial All of these views compete for followers The problem in my view with all these attempts is that they fail to take seriously the first verse which as I have already said is the key to the whole book That is in short the book is an unveiling of Jesus The book is about Jesus Who is he and what has he done That is what the book is about That is what the first verse says Now we must discover the historical situation which gave birth to the book At the end of the first century the Church in certain areas was suffering persecution The emperor was demanding worship and the Christians were refusing to do so In consequence the emperor was killing some and seizing the property of others Here is how it worked In each village and town as well as

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/revintr2.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • Interview With Dr. James H. Charlesworth
    it has no meaning for today But most exegetes who look to the New Testament see it as a combination of messages for the first century or the early part of the second century and also has a very powerful message for us today And so for example when Jesus says Come follow me in the gospels it s not a message only to first century people but is a message for all those who believe in him and commit to him And so when we get to the Revelation of John and what are we left with we re left with quite a bit That is God is before us the answer has not yet been given God is not finished with his creation and the future may be glorious and beautifu will know it to be the case because of the message And exactly how it will happen will be according to God s message and maybe not according to the description of the first century text PN Can you tell a little about the background of Book of Revelation CHARLESWORTH Yes That s easy to do Let me stress first of all that we can date it approximately to the A D 90s because everybody knows about the wicked beast who has a number on his forehead of six hundred and sixty six and the author goes on to say this is indeed a human Well it must be someone who is threatening the community Well if the community is facing martyrdom it would be from Rome So the most logical would be to look at the emperors and remember the number six hundred and sixty six there s also many text that have the number as six hundred and sixteen So it would be helpful if our explanation would clarify that and how we can have differences Well Nero according to Hebrew when you put it into Hebrew letters now Hebrew letters have numerical value When you put it into Hebrew it s six hundred sixteen But we have a text among the Dead Sea Scrolls that writes spells the name Nero a little differently so that the full numeration would be six hundred and sixty six So I am convinced anyway that the wicked beast is Nero That s our best explanation Secondly you were talking about how to contextualize it Beginning just after the conquest of the Holy Land by Alexander the Great you have the writings of what we call the great apocalypses You have the apocalypse of Enoch then you have the apocalypse of Daniel then you have the apocalypse of Moses and so forth In the latter part of the first century the time that the apocalypse of John was being written the great apocalypses were being written That is the apocalypse of Ezra the apocalypse of Abraham as well as another apocalypse we call the second apocalypse of Enoch PN And these were Jewish apocalypses CHARLESWORTH All of these are

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/revappen.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • B461 -- Apocalyptic Literature
    call apocalyptic Course Requirements The student will be required to read the textbook listed below as well as the lectures for this course The student will also be required to take a final exam on the material covered in the lectures and the textbook Textbook The student will do his or her primary work in the Biblical and extra biblical texts which will be assigned as the course proceeds The

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/apocaly.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • L425 Biblical Textual Criticism - Title Page
    of a document In particular Old Testament text criticism attempts to assemble and evaluate the various readings of the Hebrew text in order to come as close as possible to what was originally written Likewise New Testament textual criticism strives to do the same for the Greek text of the New Testament In addition text criticism also seeks to understand the history and transmission of the text Course Requirements To accomplish the above mentioned goal the student will be required to read sections of the textbooks listed below and various portions of the Old and New Testaments as well as the lectures attached to this syllabus Then the student will be required to answer in essay form the questions found at the end of the lectures Time Requirements L425 Biblical Textual Criticism Introduction is designed to be completed in one academic quarter 10 weeks Textbooks Wurthwein Ernst The Text of the Old Testament Grand Rapids Eerdmans 1994 Aland Kurt and Barbara Text of the New Testament Grand Rapids Eerdmans 1989 As well as these the student must have a Bible preferably in a modern translation A Hebrew Old Testament and a Greek New Testament are also essential to the course

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/l425intr.htm (2013-12-09)
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