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  • QHCC People Flier Front
    Publishing Writers Remata Home Services About Us Videos Servants Announcements Messages Financial Contact Us People Flier Front Go to back Go to back School Church Publishing Writers Remata Christianity We Believe Home Services About Us Videos Servants Announcements Messages Financial

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  • QHPH Contact Us
    to Contact Us Quartz Hill Publishing House 43543 51st Street West Quartz Hill CA 93536 Office 661 722 0891 Fax 661 943 3484 Web administrator administrator theology edu Email us at info theology edu for information or to submit books for our consideration We prefer electronic submissions Quartz Hill Publishing House is the publishing subsidiary of Quartz Hill School of Theology a ministry of Quartz Hill Community Church School Church

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  • paying For instance you ll get academic credit for your work Check out a course try it on for size see if it fits Click on the tabs above the words to the left and the blue hyperlinks below to discover some of what we can offer The High Desert Christian Writerâ s Guild Faculty and Staff created Books Journal Calendar But God Loves Us And Knows What He Is Doing Be Sure to Check A RESPONSE TO ANTI SEMITISM Faculty and Staff Blogs Jim West s Blog Nettelhorst s Ramblings A Blog Quartz Hill School of Theology has published Jim West s books Biblical Studies A Beginners Guide to Significant Aspects of the Study of the Bible and Systematic Theology Theology for the Person in the Pew The Current Issue of Quartz Hill Journal of Theology is available HERE It is a quarterly journal of Bible and contemporary theological thought Past Issue of Quartz Hill Journal of Theology is available HERE Inner Beauty a calendar for 2006 featuring photographs by Dandi Moyers our Assistant Editor is now available HERE Featuring beautiful closeups of flowers A Photo From Inner Beauty Other Stuff Of Interest About the Church that Supports Us

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  • Bible Summary: Daily Bible Reading
    8 10 18 Num 11 13 19 Num 14 15 20 Num 16 17 21 Num 18 19 22 Num 20 21 23 Num 22 24 24 Num 25 26 25 Num 27 29 26 Num 30 31 27 Num 32 33 28 Num 34 36 MARCH 1 Deu 1 2 2 Deu 3 4 3 Deu 5 7 4 Deu 8 10 5 Deu 11 12 6 Deu 13 15 7 Deu 16 18 8 Deu 19 21 9 Deu 22 24 10 Deu 25 27 11 Deu 28 12 Deu 29 31 13 Deu 32 34 14 Jos 1 3 15 Jos 4 6 16 Jos 7 9 17 Jos 10 11 18 Jos 12 14 19 Jos 15 17 20 Jos 18 20 21 Jos 21 22 22 Jos 23 24 23 Jud 1 3 24 Jud 4 6 25 Jud 7 8 26 Jud 9 10 27 Jud 11 13 28 Jud 14 16 29 Jud 17 19 30 Jud 20 21 31 Rut 1 4 APRIL 1 1 Sam 1 3 2 1 Sam 4 7 3 1 Sam 8 10 4 1 Sam 11 13 5 1 Sam 14 15 6 1 Sam 16 17 7 1 Sam 18 20 8 1 Sam 21 24 9 1 Sam 25 27 10 1 Sam 28 31 11 2 Sam 1 3 12 2 Sam 4 7 13 2 Sam 8 11 14 2 Sam 12 13 15 2 Sam 14 15 16 2 Sam 16 18 17 2 Sam 19 20 18 2 Sam 21 22 19 2 Sam 23 24 20 1 Kin 1 2 21 1 Kin 3 5 22 1 Kin 6 7 23 1 Kin 8 24 1 Kin 9 10 25 1 Kin 11 12 26 1 Kin 13 14 27 1 Kin 15 17 28 1 Kin 18 19 29 1 Kin 20 21 30 1 Kin 22 MAY 1 2 Kin 1 3 2 2 Kin 4 5 3 2 Kin 6 8 4 2 Kin 9 10 5 2 Kin 11 13 6 2 Kin 14 16 7 2 Kin 17 18 8 2 Kin 19 21 9 2 Kin 22 23 10 2 Kin 24 25 11 1 Chr 1 2 12 1 Chr 3 5 13 1 Chr 6 7 14 1 Chr 8 10 15 1 Chr 11 13 16 1 Chr 14 16 17 1 Chr 17 20 18 1 Chr 21 23 19 1 Chr 24 26 20 1 Chr 27 29 21 2 Chr 1 4 22 2 Chr 5 7 23 2 Chr 8 11 24 2 Chr 12 15 25 2 Chr 16 19 26 2 Chr 20 22 27 2 Chr 23 25 28 2 Chr 26 28 29 2 Chr 29 30 30 2 Chr 31 33 31 2 Chr 34 36 JUNE 1 Ezr 1 2 2 Ezr 3 4 3 Ezr 5 6 4 Ezr 7 8 5 Ezr 9 10 6 Neh 1 2

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  • Bible Summary: How to Study the Bible
    ask God who gives generously to all without finding fault and it will be given to him But when he asks he must believe and not doubt because he who doubts is like a wave of the sea blown and tossed by the wind That man should not think he will receive anything from the Lord he is a double minded man unstable in all he does James 1 5 8 Come near to God and he will come near to you Wash your hands you sinners and purify your hearts you double minded James 4 8 Notice the sheer idiocy and irrationality of the hypocrisy a person goes to God to request something that He has promised to give but then doesn t believe God will give it Such an attitude irrationally contradicts the truthfulness and goodness of God not to mention explicit biblical statements that God does not lie The second passage in James 4 8 goes even further equating hypocrisy with sin or better yet portrays the sinner as being a hypocrite by definition After all a Christian claims to be filled with the Holy Spirit cleansed by the sacrifice of Christ a new creature and yet he sins Contradiction Of all things a nonbeliever delights in most it is to point out the inconsistency of believers I give two examples Catholic theology teaches that the Pope and Church are infallible The doctrines and traditions handed down from the fathers are as much the words of God as the Bible Yet thousands who claim to be Catholic feel perfectly justified ignoring the Catholic Church s teaching on birth control abortion or women in the Church How can this be Doublethink hypocrisy inconsistency To be a consistent Catholic to obey the concept of non contradiction the follower of Rome must accept what the Catholic Church says in all things Otherwise that one becomes by definition no longer Catholic but Protestant By contrast Baptists claim in the Protestant tradition that the Bible alone is authoritative that the individual Christian is free to interpret the Bible for himself and that all believers are priests equal before God Yet in practice the standard traditional interpretation of the Bible is the true authority and to dissent from that interpretation particularly if you act upon it will often result in church discipline censure and possible expulsion as the pastor alone is really in charge of things Where then is biblical authority Where then is soul liberty Where then is the priesthood of all believers They are swallowed in doublethink What is in our heads rarely matches our practice and often contradicts other ideas in our heads Humans are strange that way Listen to George Orwell The Party said that Oceania had never been in alliance with Eurasia He Winston Smith knew that Oceania had been in alliance with Eurasia as short a time as four years ago But where did that knowledge exist Only in his own consciousness which in any case must soon be annihilated And if all others accepted the lie which the Party imposed if all records told the same tale then the lie passed into history and became truth Who controls the past ran the Party slogan controls the future who controls the present controls the past And yet the past though of its nature alterable never had been altered Whatever was true now was true from everlasting to everlasting It was quite simple All that was needed was an unending series of victories over your own memory Reality control they called it in Newspeak doublethink Stand easy barked the instructress a little more genially Winston sank his arms to his sides and slowly refilled his lungs with air His mind slid away into the labyrinthine world of doublethink To know and not to know to be conscious of complete truthfulness while telling carefully constructed lies to hold simultaneously two opinions which canceled out knowing them to be contradictory and believing in both of them to use logic against logic to repudiate morality while laying claim to it to believe that democracy was impossible and that the Party was the guardian of democracy to forget whatever it was necessary to forget then to draw it back into memory again at the moment when it was needed and then promptly to forget it again and above all to apply the same process to the process itself that was the ultimate subtlety consciously to induce unconsciousness and then once again to become unconscious of the act of hypnosis you had just performed Even to understand the word doublethink involved the use of doublethink George Orwell 1984 pp 35 36 c The Principle of the Excluded Middle The principle of the excluded middle asserts that any statement is either true or false Some have objected that if this principle is accepted one is forced into a two valued orientation which implies that everything is either or with no middle ground possible Such an objection results from a misunderstanding of the principle If you have something that is gray for instance the statements this is black or this is white are both false When faced with a situation where one is given such statements this is white or this is black while both statements cannot be true they very easily might both be false When one restricts oneself to statements that are unambiguous and precise then the principle of excluded middle is perfectly valid In other words what this principle asserts is that real contradiction is not possible only apparent contradiction the result of limited language or data By the principle of excluded middle when faced with the question of whether light is made of waves or particles since the experiments contradict each other it is best to assume that light is neither wave nor particle but something else gray 4 The Bible is unique The Bible should not be viewed as equivalent to a work of Shakespeare Shakespeare was brilliant but his

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  • Bible Summary: General Information About the Text
    problem Which text accurately records the original statements b The variants must then be examined c The most likely reading is then determined For the Old Testament in order to carry out these steps it is necessary to use the Masoretic Text which ordinarily serves as the basis from which the textual critic will work Combined with the Masoretic Text the critic will consult all the ancient Hebrew manuscripts and versions that might be available 2 The most important Hebrew manuscripts for Old Testament textual criticism are a The St Petersburg or Leningrad Codex 1008 A D It is the largest and only complete manuscript of the entire Old Testament b The Aleppo Codex 930 A D It used to be a complete copy of the Old Testament but was partially destroyed in a synagogue fire in 1948 c The British Museum Codex 950 A D It is an incomplete copy of the Pentateuch d The Cairo Codex 895 A D A copy of the Former and Latter Prophets Joshua Judges 1 and 2 Samuel 1 and 2 Kings Isaiah Jeremiah Ezekiel and the twelve minor prophets e The St Petersburg Leningrad Codex of the Prophets 916 A D containing only the Latter Prophets f The Reuchlin Codex of the Prophets 1105 A D g Cairo Geniza fragments 6th to 9th century A D h Qumran Manuscripts the Dead Sea Scrolls 200 B C 70 A D 3 The most important ancient translations of the Old Testament into languages other than Hebrew are a The Septuagint several versions b The Aramaic Targums several versions c The Syriac Peshitta d The Samaritan Pentateuch e The Latin Vulgate 4 Ideally the work of textual criticism should proceed with all of these ancient versions and copies readily available There are then some basic rules that help place the textual criticism of the Bible whether Old or New Testament on a firm basis that generally avoids arbitrariness and subjectivity a For the Old Testament where the Hebrew manuscripts and the ancient versions agree we may assume that the original reading has been preserved Likewise with the New Testament where the various manuscripts agree we may assume the original text has been preserved To our great relief this covers 95 per cent of the Bible b Where the manuscripts differ among themselves one should chose either the more difficult reading from the point of view of language and subject matter or the reading that most readily makes the development of the other readings intelligible In order to make this choice it is necessary that the critic have a thorough knowledge of the history and character of the various manuscripts It needs also to be realized that these criteria work together and complement one another A more difficult reading does not mean a meaningless reading c However the critic must not assume that just because a reading appears meaningless that it necessarily is Scribes are not likely to turn a meaningful passage into gibberish Therefore if a passage is not understandable that is often as far as we can go We must as scholars acknowledge our own ignorance d With the Old Testament where the Hebrew manuscripts and the translations differ and a superior reading cannot be demonstrated on the basis of the above rules then one should as a matter of first principle allow the Hebrew text to stand With the New Testament one will generally choose the shorter reading because of the tendency of scribes to try to explain passages e Where the different manuscripts differ and none of them seem to make any sense one may attempt a conjecture concerning the true reading a conjecture that must be validated by demonstrating the process of the textual corruption that would have lead to the existing text forms Such a conjecture however must not be used to validate the interpretation of a whole passage in that it might have been made on the basis of an expectation derived from the whole 5 The Causes of Textual Corruption The goal of textual criticism is to remove the textual errors and restore the original readings To aid in this goal it is helpful if the textual critic has an idea of what sorts of errors he or she is likely to find When copying out a text errors occur in every conceivable way as we no doubt know from our own experiences Sometimes it is difficult to explain even to ourselves how we might have come to make a particular error Therefore it is unlikely that we will be able to correct or explain everything that has eluded the scribes over the centuries A reading that appears doubtful or corrupt to us today may have been caused by a hole or some other damage to the copyist s manuscript Or maybe the letters or words in a given section of his text were faded and nearly illegible forcing the copyist to make his best guess Moreover a single error can give rise to many others leaving us with no clue as to how it might have happened And of course as always the assumption of a textual error may really be only a cover for our failure to understand the language or the idiom Beyond these unrecoverable sorts of errors there are two categories of errors that may be distinguished and often corrected errors due to an unintentional mechanical lapse on the part of the copyist often called Errors of Reading and Writing and two errors that are the result of deliberate alteration called Intentional Alterations a Errors of Reading and Writing 1 Confusion of similar letters In Hebrew there are several letters which look very similar to one another the B and K R and D H and T W and Y 2 Transposition of Letters 3 Haplography a fancy word that means when there were two or more identical or similar letters groups of letters or words all in sequence one of them gets omitted by error Of course there is some evidence that some of these supposed errors are actually equivalent to English contractions like don t instead of do not and therefore are not errors at all 4 Dittography another fancy word that refers to an error caused by repeating a letter group of letters a word or a group of words The opposite really of Haplography 5 Homoioteleuton an even fancier word which refers to the error that occurs when two words are identical or similar in form or have similar endings and are close to each other It is easy in this sort of situation for the eye of the copyist to skip from one word to the other leaving out everything in between A good example of this occurs in 1 Samuel 14 41 Therefore Saul said unto the Lord God of Israel give a perfect lot KJV Therefore Saul said O Lord God of Israel why hast thou not answered thy servant this day If this guilt is in me or in Jonathan my son O Lord God of Israel give Urim but if this guilt is in thy people Israel give Thummim RSV The copyist s eye jumped from the first instance of the word Israel to the last instance leaving out everything in between for the reading that the KJV translators had at their disposal The word translated perfect is spelled with the same consonants in Hebrew TH M M as the word Thummim 6 Errors of Joining and Dividing Words This is more a problem in the New Testament than it is in the Old Testament for while the Greek manuscripts were written well into the Medieval period without spacing or dividing signs between words there is no evidence that this was ever the case with the Old Testament Hebrew texts In fact the evidence is very strong to the contrary inscriptions on walls from the time of Hezekiah actually had dots between each word to separate them from each other b Deliberate Alterations The Samaritan Pentateuch as an example is notorious for its purposeful changes designed to help legitimize some of their sectarian biases They were sort of like the Jehovah s witnesses of their day A more substantive change in the Hebrew text came after the Babylonian captivity in the time of Ezra fifth century BC when the alphabet changed from the Old Hebrew Script to the Aramaic Square Script in which all copies of the Old Testament except for the Samaritan Pentateuch are written It should not surprise us that there have been a certain amount of alteration in the text over time since the Bible was not intended to be the object of scholarly study but rather was to be read by the whole believing community as God s word to them Thus the text would undergo adaptations to fit the linguistic needs of the community For instance in Isaiah 39 1 the Masoretic Text preserves a rare word hazaq which has the sense of to get well recuperate The community that produced the Dead Sea scrolls altered this word to the more common Hebrew word for get well zayah Other examples of adaptation to colloquial usage are likely The lack of early material for the Old Testament makes it impossible to demonstrate these sorts of alterations on a larger scale But a few small alterations are easily demonstrable The treatment of the divine name Baal is an example of deliberate change for theological reasons In personal names which included the word Baal which simply means master or lord the scribes deliberately replaced Baal with Bosheth which means shame Hence Jonathan s son was actually named Meribbaal rather than Mephibosheth cf 1 Chron 8 34 9 30 and 2 Sam 9 6 19 24 21 7 Another example of deliberate alteration is found in Job 1 5 11 and 2 5 9 where we now read the word berek to bless with God as the object even though we should expect to find the word qalal to curse The scribes replaced the offensive expression to curse God with a euphemism motivated no doubt by their fear of taking God s name in vain IV A History of English Bible Translation The first English translation of the Bible was undertaken by John Wycliffe 1320 1384 By 1380 he had finished the translation of the New Testament however his translation of the Old Testament was incomplete at the time of his death Friends and students completed the task after his death His translation was not from the original Greek and Hebrew texts instead he made use of the Latin Vulgate William Tyndale s translation of the Bible again relied heavily on the Vulgate however he was a good Greek scholar and so he did make use of Erasmus Greek text and some other helps that had been unavailable to Wycliffe The New Testament was completed in 1525 and the Pentateuch in 1530 He was martyred before he could complete the Old Testament Miles Coverdale a friend of Tyndale prepared and published a Bible dedicated to Henry VIII in 1535 The New Testament is based largely on Tyndale s version Matthew s Bible appeared in 1537 and its authorship is somewhat unclear it is probable that it was produced by John Rogers a friend of Tyndale Apparently Rogers came into possession of Tyndale s unpublished translations of the historical books of the Old Testament and so included these in this version which again rests heavily on the work of Tyndale as well as Coverdale The Great Bible of 1539 was based on the Tyndale Coverdale and Matthew s Bibles It was a large volume chained to the reading desk in churches and from this fact derives its name The Geneva Bible of 1560 was produced by scholars who fled to Geneva Switzerland from England during the persecution instigated by Queen Mary It was a revision of the Great Bible The Bishops Bible of 1568 was produced under the direction of the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reign of Elizabeth I It is to a large extent simply a revision of the Great Bible with some influence of the Geneva Bible It was used chiefly by the clergy and was unpopular with the average person The Douay Bible was a Roman Catholic version translated from the Latin Vulgate The New Testament was published at Rheims in 1582 and the Old Testament at Douay in 1609 1610 It contains controversial notes and until recently was the generally accepted English version for the Catholic Church The King James or Authorized Version was published in 1611 It was produced by forty seven scholars under the authorization of King James I of England The Bishops Bible served as the basis for this version though they did study the Greek and Hebrew texts and consulted other English translations It was the most popular translation in English for well over three hundred years undergoing at least three revisions before 1800 The New King James Version appeared in 1982 The New Testament had been published in 1979 One hundred nineteen scholars worked on the project sponsored by the International Trust for Bible Studies and Thomas Nelson Publishers They sought to preserve and improve the 1611 version The Revised Version was published between 1881 and 1885 It was made by a group of English and American scholars It was to a large extent a revision of the King James translation though the scholars involved did check the most ancient copies of the original scriptures using manuscripts that were unavailable at the time the King James Version was produced The American Standard Version of 1900 1901 is the American version of the Revised Version with those renderings preferred by the American members of the Revision Committee of 1881 1885 The Revised Standard Version was published in 1952 In 1928 the copyright of the American Standard Version was acquired by the International Council of Religious Education which authorized a revision by a committee of thirty two scholars The New Testament was issued in 1946 the complete Bible in 1952 The copyright is currently owned by the Division of Education of the National Council of Churches of Christ in the United States of America The Revised Standard Version Bible Committee is a continuing body which is both ecumenical and international with active Protestant and Catholic members from Great Britain Canada and the United States Additional revisions were made in the New Testament in 1971 and in 1990 the New Revised Standard Version was issued The Berkeley Version was published in 1959 The New Testament was originally translated into modern English by a single individual Gerrit Verkuyl in 1945 With a staff of twenty translators including professors from various Christian colleges and seminaries all under his direction a translation of the Old Testament was rendered The Amplified Bible appeared in 1965 It was commissioned by the Lockman Foundation and is unusual in that it has bracketed explanatory words to try to explain somewhat difficult passages The Jerusalem Bible was published in 1966 It is a Roman Catholic work originally done in French at the Dominican Biblical School in Jerusalem in 1956 The French title was La Bible de Jerusalem The English version was translated from the original Hebrew and Greek texts but it follows the French version on most matters of interpretation It is the only major English translation that makes use of the divine name Yahweh in the Old Testament The translation includes the Apocrypha A revision called The New Jerusalem Bible came out in 1989 The New English Bible was published in 1970 It was produced by a joint committee of Bible scholars from leading denominations in England Scotland Wales and Ireland assisted by the university presses of Oxford and Cambridge Twenty two years were spent in the work of translation with the New Testament arriving in 1961 The full Bible includes the Apocrypha It is printed in paragraphed single column format with verse numbers along the outside margin of the pages A revision of this translation called the Revised English Bible appeared in 1989 The New American Standard Bible was published in 1971 It is a revision of the American Standard Version and was commissioned by the Lockman Foundation A group of Bible scholars worked for ten years translating from the original texts and attempting to render the grammar and terminology of the American Standard Version into more contemporary English except when God is addressed Then it reverts to archaic King James style language The New Testament appeared in 1963 The Living Bible appeared in 1971 It is a paraphrase by Kenneth N Taylor he sought to express what the writers of scripture meant in the simplest modern English possible It is a paraphrase of the American Standard Version it is not a translation from the original languages Today s English Version Good News Bible was published in 1976 The New Testament entitled Good News For Modern Man was published in 1966 by the American Bible Society A translation committee of Bible scholars was appointed to work with the United Bible Societies to make a similar translation of the Old Testament Their objective was to provide a faithful translation into natural clear and simple contemporary English American and British editions of the complete Bible appeared in 1976 The Contemporary English Version an update of Today s English Version was completed in 1996 It is valuable for reducing the perceived anti Semitism of the New Testament not that it could be genuinely anti Semitic since its authors are Jewish but anti Semites can twist certain things to come up with appalling ideas The New International Version was published in 1978 Under the sponsorship of the New York International Bible Society now the International Bible Society a Committee on Bible Translation was formed to oversee a completely new translation from the best original texts The Committee enlisted Bible scholars from the United States Great Britain Canada Australia

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  • Bible Summary: An Outline of the Bible
    7 17 B Psalms I Book 1 Genesis 1 41 II Book 2 Exodus 42 72 III Book 3 Leviticus 73 89 IV Book 4 Numbers 90 106 V Book 5 Deuteronomy 107 150 Authors Moses 90 Heman the Ezrahite 88 Ethan the Ezrahite 89 Solomon 72 127 David 73 times 3 9 11 32 34 41 51 65 68 70 86 103 108 110 122 124 131 133 138 145 Asaph 12 times 50 73 83 Sons of Korah 9 times 42 44 45 47 49 84 85 87 Author unknown 49 times all the rest The Septuagint LXX gives additional authorship identifications as follows Jeremiah 137 Haggai and Zechariah 146 147 Ezra 119 Hezekiah 15 times 120 134 Duplicate Psalms 14 and 53 note 14 uses Yahweh translated Lord and 53 uses Elohim translated God 40 13 17 and 70 108 and 57 7 11 plus 60 5 12 C Proverbs I Solomon s Book of Proverbs A Prologue 1 1 7 B Exhortations to Wisdom 1 8 9 18 1 Warnings Against Following Sinners 1 8 19 2 Wisdom Personified 1 20 33 3 What Happens When Wisdom is Followed 2 1 4 27 4 What Happens When Folly is Followed 4 1 7 27 5 Wisdom Calls 8 1 9 12 6 Folly Calls 9 13 18 C The Proverbs of Solomon 10 1 22 16 D Epilogue 22 17 24 22 II Proverbs the Sequel A More Sayings of the Wise Appendix 1 22 23 34 B Proverbs of Solomon Copied by Hezekiah s Men Appendix 2 25 1 29 27 C The Sayings of Agur Appendix 3 30 1 33 D The Sayings of King Lemuel Appendix 4 31 1 31 D Ecclesiastes I Introduction 1 1 11 A Prologue 1 1 2 B Nothing New 1 3 11 II Experiments 1 12 2 26 A Wisdom 1 12 18 B Expansion of the Search for Meaning 2 1 16 C Conclusion of the Experiments 2 17 26 III A Time for Everything 3 1 12 8 A Times and Seasons 3 1 6 6 B Summary 6 7 12 C Times and Seasons Part 2 7 1 12 8 IV Conclusion 12 9 14 F Song of Songs Song of Solomon I Title 1 1 II First Poem 1 2 2 7 III Second Poem 2 8 3 5 IV Third Poem 3 6 5 1 V Fourth Poem 5 2 6 3 VI Fifth Poem 6 4 8 7 VII Sixth Poem 8 8 14 XII A Survey of the Books of the Prophets A Amos I The General Judgments on the Nations 1 1 2 16 II The Specific Judgments on Israel 3 1 6 14 III The symbolic judgment on Israel 7 1 9 10 IV The Millennial Glory for Israel 9 11 15 B Jonah I Jonah Runs Away 1 1 17 II Jonah Prays 2 1 10 III Jonah Obeys 3 1 10 IV Jonah Complains 4 1 11 C Hosea I The Prologue Hosea and the Prostitute 1 3 II Israel s Sin Described 4 7 III Israel s Sin Punished 8 10 IV Israel Restored 11 14 D Micah I Judgment Against Samaria and Jerusalem 1 1 2 13 II Rebuke and Promise 3 1 5 15 III The Case Against Israel 6 1 7 20 E Isaiah I Prophecies of Condemnation 1 35 A Concerning Judah and Israel 1 12 B Concerning the Nations 13 23 C The Little Apocalypse 24 27 D Concerning Sinners in Israel 28 35 II Hezekiah s Troubles 36 39 A The Threat of Assyria 36 37 B The Threat of Babylon 38 39 III Prophecies of Consolation 40 66 A God s Greatness 40 48 B God s Grace 49 59 C God s Glory for Israel 60 66 F Zephaniah I Judgment on the Earth 1 1 3 II Judgment on Judah 1 4 2 3 III The Day of Yahweh 2 4 3 20 G Nahum I Yahweh Will Avenge His People 1 1 15 II The Battle for Nineveh 2 1 13 III The Fate of Nineveh 3 1 19 H Jeremiah I Early Prophecies Under Josiah and Jehoiakim 1 20 A The Commission of Jeremiah 1 B Judah Yahweh s Unfaithful Wife 2 6 C Judah the Hypocrite 7 10 D Judah Breaker of the Covenant 11 12 E Five Parables of Judgment 13 20 II Later Prophecies Under Jehoiakim and Zedekiah 21 39 A Captivity in Babylon Predicted 21 29 B Restoration Predicted 30 33 C Captivity Anticipated 34 39 III Prophecies After the Fall of Jerusalem 40 45 A Gedaliah as Governor 40 41 B Johanan s Rebellion 41 43 C Jeremiah s Prophesies in Egypt 43 44 D Jeremiah s Prophesy for Baruch 45 IV Prophesies Concerning Foreign Nations 46 51 A Southwest 46 47 B Southeast 48 49 22 C North 49 23 33 D East 49 34 51 64 V The Fall of Jerusalem 52 I Lamentations I Bitter Affliction 1 1 22 II Yahweh s Anger 2 1 22 III Witness 3 1 66 IV Paradise Lost 4 1 22 V A Prayer of Remembrance 5 1 22 J Habakkuk I Habakkuk s First Complaint 1 1 4 II Yahweh s Response 1 5 11 III Habakkuk s Second Complaint 1 12 17 IV Yahweh s Response 2 1 5 V Five Woes 2 6 20 VI A Prayer 3 1 19 K Daniel I The Selection and Preparation of God s Servants 1 1 21 II Nebuchadnezzar s First Dream 2 1 49 III The Golden Image 3 1 30 IV Nebuchadnezzar s Second Dream 4 1 37 V Belshazzar s Feast 5 1 31 VI Daniel in the Lion s Den 6 1 28 VII Visions 7 1 12 13 L Obadiah I Edom Will Be Destroyed 1 9 II Edom Will Be Punished Because of Its Sin Against Israel 10 21 M Haggai I Yahweh s

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