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  • New Testament Introduction: 2 Timothy and Titus
    and its purpose we will here examine only the outline of both of these letters 2 Timothy like 1 Timothy was written to confute the false teachers and help the church achieve some level of minimal organization Here is its outline 1 Greeting 1 1 5 2 Encouragement to Faithfulness 2 1 13 3 True v False Teachings 2 14 3 9 4 Final Words of Encouragement 3 10 4

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/ntintro/2tim-titus.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • New Testament Introduction: Philemon
    The single chapter which makes up the book is wholly concerned with the fair treatment of Onesimus a runaway slave Paul and the ancient Church and the ancient world as a whole accepted the practice of slavery In this instance Paul is concerned for the welfare of a Christian slave and the treatment he would receive at the hands of his Christian master This letter is therefore not an example

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/ntintro/philemon.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • New Testament Introduction: Hebrews
    Eli moved the Ark from Shechem to Shiloh that this move was illegitimate and set up an illegitimate priesthood When the Taheb messiah came they believe the Sanctuary would be restored to its rightful place The Old Testament version of the Samaritans is slightly different and is told in 2 Kings 17 We know very little about the relationship between the Jews and the Samaritans until Ezra s reforms were carried out in the mid 4th century BC Ezra 4 describes these relations The Samaritans clearly had bad relations with the Jews of Judea but that is not the case with Jews in other parts of the Near East In fact a colon y of Jews at Elephantim the Samaritans in the building of their own temple Why Because the Samaritans had built their own Temple on Mt Gerizim in the year 388 BC Thus in Jerusalem there was a Temple built after the Exile and at Gerizim there was a similar Temple to Yahweh built in the same period of time Relations between the Samaritans and Judeans worsened in 128 BC when the Temple on Mt Gerizim was destroyed by the Judeans In fact it was the Jewish High Priest who led the battle against the Samaritans John Hyrcanus From that point on the Samaritans were viewed with disfavor by the Jews and the Jews were despised by the Samaritans In the era of the New Testament these strained relationships festered between mainline Judaism and Samaritan Judaism Nevertheless the Samaritans shared several things in common with the early Church in distinction with other segments of Judaism First the described themselves as the sons of light Second both early Christianity and the Samaritans were critical of the Jerusalem Temple cf Acts 7 22ff Third both groups had a lively expectation

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/ntintro/heb.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • New Testament Introduction: James
    be a genuine letter from the brother of the Lord while others describe it as a commentary on the sermon on the mount Amidst all this discussion the truth lies somewhere The careful reader of James will notice that it has great similarity to the Old Testament book of Proverbs Like Proverbs then James is an example of wisdom literature a type of literature which seeks to impart wisdom for daily living Because of this it is difficult to outline the book as it follows no strict structure Rather it is made up of short pithy sayings intended to make one wise A glance at the topics discussed in this letter will show us its major concerns 1 Greeting 1 1 2 Trials and Temptations 1 2 18 3 Deeds 1 19 27 4 Impartiality 2 1 9 5 Keep the Law 2 10 13 6 Faith and Works 2 14 26 7 The Tongue 3 1 12 8 Wisdom as God s Gift 3 13 18 9 Lust 4 1 10 10 Judging 4 11 12 11 Arrogance 4 13 17 12 Warning to the Rich 5 1 6 13 Patience 5 7 11 14 Right Behavior 5 15

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/ntintro/james.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • New Testament Introduction: 1 Peter
    Jerusalem had carried out some evangelization It was written in Rome the burgeoning center of the Christian faith One of the curious aspects of the letter is that it seems to have been composed over a long period of time That is in the first part of the book 1 3 4 11 persecution is only a possibility but in the second part of the book 4 12 5 11 persecution has actually broken out So at some point during the composition process of the book the author received word that persecution had actually begun and so changes direction and speaks of the situation as it then stood The purpose of the book then is quite easy to understand it was written to encourage those who would face and were facing persecution for their faith by the Roman government Some scholars believe that the book was also written as a baptismal booklet intended to give instruction to those entering the church This is quite possible as they would certainly need to know how to endure the persecution that they might face A glance at the outline of the book makes clear this purpose 1 Opening Greeting 1 1 2 2

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/ntintro/1pet.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • New Testament Introduction: 2 Peter
    the year 150 AD By that time the first generation of Christians were gone and many of the second and third generation were dead as well This caused many to doubt the promise of the second coming of Christ which according to Jesus own word would take place before this generation passes away When not only that generation died but a couple of others some doubted Thus this brief letter was composed in order simply to encourage belief in the second coming of Jesus The place of writing and those to whom the letter was written are unknown and unknowable The structure of the letter is this 1 Grow in Virtue 1 3 21 2 Condemnation of False Teachers borrowed in whole from Jude 2 1 22 3 Why Jesus Has not Yet Come 3 1 16 4 Exhortation 3 17 18 The third division of the letter is the heart and soul In this section Peter declares that though delayed Jesus will come His delay is an opportunity for their repentance Though brief and often overlooked this letter has been the major source for continued belief in the Parousia second coming of Jesus for with the Lord a day

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/ntintro/2pet.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • New Testament Introduction: 1-3 John
    letters of John were written by a member of the Johannine school the folks who gave us The Gospel of John 1 3 John and Revelation First John was written around the year 100 AD to Christians in the area of Ephesus Second John was written at the same time and place for the same audience as was Third John as well The purpose of the Johannine epistles is to remind the faithful to remain faithful and to call them to realize that the gnostics are not correct in what they believe If they had really been Christians they would have remained within the faith but as they were not genuinely faithful they soon left the Church and adhered to the teachings of the heretics We will look at each book in brief outline 1 John 1 Prologue 1 1 4 2 God is Light and Gives True Light to His True Children 1 5 3 10 3 Walk in the Light and Not in the Darkness 3 11 5 12 4 Conclusion 5 13 21 2 John 1 Prologue 1 3 2 Joy 4 3 Do Not Receive Heretics into Your Home 5 12 4 Conclusion 13 3 John

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/ntintro/1-3jn.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • New Testament Introduction: Jude
    other catholic epistles this one is also pseudonymous The epistle is so difficult to date that some scholars date it to the year 50 while others say that it was written in the 90 s It seems most likely to me that the letter comes from the end of the first century for that was the period when heresies were becoming more widespread in the Church It would not make any sense to date the letter before this period because then it would be speaking to a situation which did not exist The letter was most likely written from one Jewish Christian enclave to another I think it was probably written from a Palestinian Church to a Jewish Christian community in Egypt where early gnosticism was very popular The letter follows this structure 1 Opening Greeting 1 2 2 Contend for the Faith 3 4 3 Examples of Punishment 5 10 4 More Examples of Punishment 11 13 5 Prophecy of Enoch Regarding these False Teachers 14 19 6 Another Appeal for Faith 20 23 7 Doxology 24 25 As is clear from this structure the letter is most concerned with showing examples of disbelief and how those disbelievers were

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/ntintro/JUDE.htm (2013-12-09)
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