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  • Hebrew Lesson Eight
    nx na j We study We are studying We do study f twOdm wOl w nx na j You study You are studying You do study m Mydim wOl Mt e a You study You are studying You do study f twOdm wOl Mt e a They study They are studying They do study m Mydim wOl Mh They study They are studying They do study f twOdm wOl Nh The Participle As Mansoor points out there is no present tense in Biblical Hebrew though the participle will sometimes convey that sense The above paradigm gives you some of the possible ways of converting the participle into equivalent English Actual context will help you decide which is the best translation at any given point Further Information on Gender Most nouns that end in either h f or t are feminine Additionally nouns that indicate females are obviously feminine even if they do not end in he or tav for example M mother There are some additional words that although they do not appear feminine are A Nouns that denote parts of the body that come in pairs are usually feminine Translation Hebrew hand dyF foot lgere eye Nyi j ear

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/hebrew/hb08.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • Hebrew Lesson Nine
    Middle Ages the Hebrew word for verb was l ap o a secondary meaning from its use in the Bible meaning action or deed Since Hebrew verbs are made up of three consonents the Medieval grammarians used the three consonents of l ap o to label the three consonents of any verb Thus the first consonent in a verb is called the p pe consonent the second consonent is called the ayin consonent and the third consonent is called the l lamed consonent Thus for example a verb ending in is called a lamed aleph verb An example would be cy which in addition to being lamed aleph is also pe yod Weak vs Strong Verbs The verbs you have thus far been exposed to have been what are classified as strong verbs This means that the root consonents show up in all the verbal forms This may sound strange and even a little scary to the beginning student but those verbs which have y w h or begin with a n are classified as weak verbs because there are certain situations where these consonents will be assimilated that is the consonents will disappear or cause odd behavior with the vowels You ll learn about weak verbs in future lessons For now you ll be learning just the strong verbs The Qal Perfect You have already learned the Qal Participle The Qal Perfect is formed by adding certain suffixes to the root consonents These suffixes are the same for the perfect of all Hebrew verbs The suffixes give information about the person gender and number Thus it is not necessary to add personal pronouns to the perfect The perfect will usually be translated into English as some sort of past tense However the perfect is not actually a past tense

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/hebrew/hb09.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • Hebrew Lesson Ten
    In English the demonstrative pronouns are Singular this that Plural these those The same words can also be used as demonstrative adjectives where they will like any adjective add a bit of detail to the noun specifying it and making it more notable The demonstrative adjectives will also match the noun being so modified in number and in the case of Hebrew of course also they will match the gender

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/hebrew/hb10.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • Hebrew Lesson Eleven
    Church Publishing Writers Remata Home About Us Bookstore Catalog Courses Library The Journal Areopagus Contact Us Lesson 11 Prepositions Vocabulary School Church Publishing Writers Remata Christianity We Believe Home About Us Bookstore Catalog Courses Library The Journal Areopagus Contact Us

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/hebrew/hb11.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • Hebrew Lesson Twelve
    Writers Remata Home About Us Bookstore Catalog Courses Library The Journal Areopagus Contact Us Lesson 12 Relative Pronouns t e Vocabulary School Church Publishing Writers Remata Christianity We Believe Home About Us Bookstore Catalog Courses Library The Journal Areopagus Contact

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/hebrew/hb12.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • Hebrew Lesson Thirteen
    Remata Home About Us Bookstore Catalog Courses Library The Journal Areopagus Contact Us Lesson 13 Verbs with Guttural Roots More on Gender Vocabulary School Church Publishing Writers Remata Christianity We Believe Home About Us Bookstore Catalog Courses Library The Journal

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/hebrew/hb13.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • Hebrew Lesson Fourteen
    Home About Us Bookstore Catalog Courses Library The Journal Areopagus Contact Us Lesson 14 Sentences in the Negative Declension of Singular Nouns Vocabulary School Church Publishing Writers Remata Christianity We Believe Home About Us Bookstore Catalog Courses Library The Journal

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/hebrew/hb14.htm (2013-12-09)
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  • Hebrew Lesson Fifteen
    Publishing Writers Remata Home About Us Bookstore Catalog Courses Library The Journal Areopagus Contact Us Lesson 15 The Dual Vocabulary School Church Publishing Writers Remata Christianity We Believe Home About Us Bookstore Catalog Courses Library The Journal Areopagus Contact Us

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/hebrew/hb15.htm (2013-12-09)
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