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  • Remata
    Believe Web www theology edu School Church Publishing Writers Remata Home Spreadsheet Web Android School Church Publishing Writers Remata Christianity We Believe Home Spreadsheet Web Android Copyright Eric Miller All

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  • Remata for Android
    you use them the csv file does not remember the font and won t keep the Greek or Hebrew On a Windows machine you must go to the Control Panel and use Regional and Language Settings to add a keyboard for the language you want Then when entering text you can then change between keyboards using alt shift Sometimes the non Latin characters don t display well standard fonts either do not support them or do not support them well Remata uses Gentium a freely distributed font that supports many languages You can download it and install it on your computer It is not necessary to have a good font the characters will still save correctly and display well in Remata but it does make things look better on your computer Xml Files Remata also reads xml files You probably don t need to worry about this right now It s easier to use csv files as described above Just skip to How to Put Card Files on Your Phone If you re still reading you must really be interested so let me start with a brief explanation Remata s web version gets its data from xml files Its xml files are complex because it tries to mimic the Remata spreadsheet s functions It also was supposed to be able to handle other data besides Greek which makes it even more complex When Remata for Android was created it was natural to use xml files They are greatly simplified from the web version Even so it became obvious that csv files would be much simpler Thus csv files are how most people should use Remata Despite this Android Remata kept it s xml file reading capability For one thing Eric the developer hates throwing code away For another he hopes to one day provide more functionality than csv files can support Rest assured your csv files will never be obsolete they will always work They just can t support some advanced features like filtering or image files that will hopefully be in future versions of Remata Finally here is some help on creating xml files for Remata should you really wish to do it Xml files can be created from text editors or from most spreadsheets The text here will only describe the Remata xml format It will be assumed that you know enough about your text editor or spreadsheet to create files like the one shown below Here is a short Remata xml card file For comparison it has the same data as the csv file above Here is a short snippet from the above xml file xml version 1 0 encoding utf 8 cardList card front danke front back thanks no thanks back card card front bitte front back please yes please back card cardList The cardList tag is used to define the list of cards Each card is defined by a card tag The front of the card is defined by a front tag The back of

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  • Quartz Hill School of Theology
    sons The artificial and selective nature of these genealogies thereby becomes apparent Matthew divides the genealogy of Jesus into three sections each with fourteen names His reason for doing this is that the Hebrew name David is written with three letters whose numerical value is fourteen To get the structure he desires Matthew left out several names which can be demonstrated by comparing his genealogy with those given in the Old Testament for instance Matthew 1 8 and 1 Chronicles 3 10 12 Therefore it seems reasonable to suspect that the author of Genesis does a similar thing with his genealogies in order to get his ten plus three pattern 1 Chronicles 16 14 17 which parallels Psalm 105 7 10 also cf Deuteronomy 7 9 states the following He is Yahweh our God his judgments are in all the earth He remembers his covenant forever the word he commanded for a thousand generations the covenant he made with Abraham the oath he swore to Isaac He confirmed it to Jacob as a decree to Israel as an everlasting covenant These passages seem to suggest that far more than the twenty generations listed in Genesis 5 and 11 existed between the time of Adam and the time of Abraham Though it is possible to read thousand generations in parallel with forever in vs 15 thereby making thousand generations figurative hyperbole one could just as easily argue that thousand generations defines forever moving from general to specific as in the numerical Proverbs Proverbs 30 15 16 30 18 19 30 24 28 30 29 31 However even if thousand generations is hyperbolic it still suggests that far more than a mere twenty generations are in view Romans 5 12 is sometimes quoted to show that death could not have existed on Earth prior to Adam s fall However it should be pointed out that the passage in Romans is speaking only about human death and that it would be difficult to press it to include the death of any other life forms Moreover before the fall it is clear from Genesis 1 29 30 that at least plants had to die in order to serve as food for people and animals This is impossible to reconcile if the passage in Romans is pressed to include any more than human beings Creationists also contend that to allow death suffering and the struggle for survival before Adam s sin is to make God into an ogre since God repeatedly describes his creation as very good in Genesis 1 However in Psalm 136 17 20 where the death of the first born in Egypt and the deaths of Sihon and Og are described the Psalmist comments that God s love endures forever Psalm 116 15 states that Blessed in the sight of God is the death of his saints In both these passages we are discussing the deaths of human beings not lower life forms Genesis 3 22 23 records that Adam and Eve

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  • The Thematic Arrangement of Biblical Texts
    description of what occurred a certain confusion results Verse five recounts how the people repented and wore sack cloth If verses 6 9 follow chronologically then why does the king order his people to do what they ve already done However if the thematic arrangement is recognized the problems evaporate and the narrative is perfectly clear and consistent Look at the pattern A The Ninevites believed God 3 5a B They declared a fast 3 5b C They put on sackcloth from the greatest to the least 3 5c C King puts on sackcloth 3 6 B Proclamation that no one is to eat or drink 3 7 C Man and beast covered with sackcloth 3 8a A Let them call urgently on God and repent 3 8b 9 C Ecclesiastes 2 1 26 1 I thought in my heart Come now I will test you with pleasure to find out what is good But that also proved to be meaningless 2 Laughter I said is foolish And what does pleasure accomplish 3 I tried cheering myself with wine and embracing folly my mind still guiding me with wisdom I wanted to see what was worthwhile for men to do under heaven during the few days of their lives 4 I undertook great projects I built houses for myself and planted vineyards 5 I made gardens and parks and planted all kinds of fruit trees in them 6 I made reservoirs to water groves of flourishing trees 7 I bought male and female slaves and had other slaves who were born in my house I also owned more herds and flocks than anyone in Jerusalem before me 8 I amassed silver and gold for myself and the treasure of kings and provinces I acquired men and women singers and a harem as well the delights of the heart of man 9 I became greater by far than anyone in Jerusalem before me In all this my wisdom stayed with me 10 I denied myself nothing my eyes desired I refused my heart no pleasure My heart took delight in all my work and this was the reward for all my labor 11 Yet when I surveyed all that my hands had done and what I had toiled to achieve everything was meaningless a chasing after the wind nothing was gained under the sun 12 Then I turned my thoughts to consider wisdom and also madness and folly What more can the king s successor do than what has already been done 13 I saw that wisdom is better than folly just as light is better than darkness 14 The wise man has eyes in his head while the fool walks in the darkness but I came to realize that the same fate overtakes them both 15 Then I thought in my heart The fate of the fool will overtake me also What then do I gain by being wise I said in my heart This too is meaningless 16 For the wise man like the fool will not be long remembered in days to come both will be forgotten Like the fool the wise man too must die 17 So I hated life because the work that is done under the sun was grievous to me All of it is meaningless a chasing after the wind 18 I hated all the things I had toiled for under the sun because I must leave them to the one who comes after me 19 And who knows whether he will be a wise man or a fool Yet he will have control over all the work into which I have poured my effort and skill under the sun This too is meaningless 20 So my heart began to despair over all my toilsome labor under the sun 21 For a man may do his work with wisdom knowledge and skill and then he must leave all he owns to someone who has not worked for it This too is meaningless and a great misfortune 22 What does a man get for all the toil and anxious striving with which he labors under the sun 23 All his days his work is pain and grief even at night his mind does not rest This too is meaningless 24 A man can do nothing better than to eat and drink and find satisfaction in his work This too I see is from the hand of God 25 for without him who can eat or find enjoyment 26 To the man who pleases him God gives wisdom knowledge and happiness but to the sinner he gives the task of gathering and storing up wealth to hand it over to the one who pleases God This too is meaningless a chasing after the wind Ecclesiastes 2 1 26 displays the following basic pattern a pattern that by now may be starting to become familiar A I thought in my heart Come now I will test you with pleasure to find out what is good 2 1a B But that also proved to be meaningless 2 1b A Testing with pleasure to discover what s good 2 2 10 B Everything is meaningless 2 11 26 In the first verse the two halves of what the author of the book of Ecclesiastes seeks to discuss are expressed In the verses that follow he does exactly what he has indicated first discussing what is good repetitiously as is the nature of Hebrew poetry and then turning to the second half at verse 11 and repetitiously describing how meaningless it is This is standard Hebrew pattern and not at all odd unless one were to insist on a western outlook in narrative or poetic techniques D Proverbs 1 10 19 10 My son if sinners entice you do not give in to them 11 If they say Come along with us let s lie in wait for someone s blood let s waylay some harmless soul 12 let s

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  • Introduction to the Bible.
    as he thinks best But the MEANING will be the same And of course between the King James and the more modern translations there is also the gap caused by the change in the English language we don t speak like the people in Shakespeare s time did but their way of speaking is no grander or any more eloquent than ours King James English was the way any farmer or fisherman of 1611 would have talked just as Today s English Version or the New International Version is the way an average person speaks today For all the snobbishness of attitude on the part of some regarding Shakespeare today in his own day he was considered somewhat vulgar and not a little risque Shakespeare was like an ordinary television drama or sitcom is for us today B Textual criticism One other change since the time of the King James translation of course is the improvement in the texts that are available to today s translators They are older and that much closer to the original moreover the methods of textual criticism the science of comparing the different and sometimes inconsistent manuscripts and determining which one is the closest to the original reading have advanced considerably since the 1600 s The history of the biblical texts shows clearly that all of them stand far removed from the originals both by time and by the process of transmission They contain not only scribal errors but even some actual transformations of the text both deliberate and accidental By means of textual criticism we attempt to find all the alterations that have occurred and then recover the earliest possible form of the text 1 Methods Textual criticism proceeds in three steps a All the variant readings of the text are collected and arranged Of course this is the very reason textual criticism is necessary at all If we had only a single copy there would be no questions but since we have several which all say different things we have a problem Which text accurately records the original statements b The variants must then be examined c The most likely reading is then determined For the Old Testament in order to carry out these steps it is necessary to use the Masoretic Text which ordinarily serves as the basis from which the textual critic will work Combined with the Masoretic Text the critic will consult all the ancient Hebrew manuscripts and versions that might be available 2 The most important Hebrew manuscripts for Old Testament textual criticism are a The St Petersburg or Leningrad Codex 1008 A D It is the largest and only complete manuscript of the entire Old Testament b The Aleppo Codex 930 A D It used to be a complete copy of the Old Testament but was partially destroyed in a synagogue fire in 1948 c The British Museum Codex 950 A D It is an incomplete copy of the Pentateuch d The Cairo Codex 895 A D A copy of the Former and Latter Prophets Joshua Judges 1 and 2 Samuel 1 and 2 Kings Isaiah Jeremiah Ezekiel and the twelve minor prophets e The Leningrad St Petersburg Codex of the Prophets 916 A D containing only the Latter Prophets f The Reuchlin Codex of the Prophets 1105 A D g Cairo Geniza fragments 6th to 9th century A D h Qumran Manuscripts the Dead Sea Scrolls 200 B C 70 A D 3 The most important ancient translations of the Old Testament into languages other than Hebrew are a The Septuagint several versions b The Aramaic Targums several versions c The Syriac Peshitta d The Samaritan Pentateuch e The Latin Vulgate 4 Ideally the work of textual criticism should proceed with all of these ancient versions and copies readily available There are then some basic rules that help place the textual criticism of the Bible whether Old or New Testament on a firm basis that generally avoids arbitrariness and subjectivity a For the Old Testament where the Hebrew manuscripts and the ancient versions agree we may assume that the original reading has been preserved Likewise with the New Testament where the various manuscripts agree we may assume the original text has been preserved To our great relief this covers 95 per cent of the Bible b Where the manuscripts differ among themselves one should chose either the more difficult reading from the point of view of language and subject matter or the reading that most readily makes the development of the other readings intelligible In order to make this choice it is necessary that the critic have a thorough knowledge of the history and character of the various manuscripts It needs also to be realized that these criteria work together and complement one another A more difficult reading does not mean a meaningless reading c However the critic must not assume that just because a reading appears meaningless that it necessarily is Scribes are not likely to turn a meaningful passage into gibberish Therefore if a passage is not understandable that is often as far as we can go We must as scholars acknowledge our own ignorance d With the Old Testament where the Hebrew manuscripts and the translations differ and a superior reading cannot be demonstrated on the basis of the above rules then one should as a matter of first principle allow the Hebrew text to stand With the New Testament one will generally choose the shorter reading because of the tendency of scribes to try to explain passages e Where the different manuscripts differ and none of them seem to make any sense one may attempt a conjecture concerning the true reading a conjecture that must be validated by demonstrating the process of the textual corruption that would have lead to the existing text forms Such a conjecture however must not be used to validate the interpretation of a whole passage in that it might have been made on the basis of an expectation derived from the whole 5 The Causes of Textual Corruption The goal of textual criticism is to remove the textual errors and restore the original readings To aid in this goal it is helpful if the textual critic has an idea of what sorts of errors he or she is likely to find When copying out a text errors occur in every conceivable way as we no doubt know from our own experiences Sometimes it is difficult to explain even to ourselves how we might have come to make a particular error Therefore it is unlikely that we will be able to correct or explain everything that has eluded the scribes over the centuries A reading that appears doubtful or corrupt to us today may have been caused by a hole or some other damage to the copyist s manuscript Or maybe the letters or words in a given section of his text were faded and nearly illegible forcing the copyist to make his best guess Moreover a single error can give rise to many others leaving us with no clue as to how it might have happened And of course as always the assumption of a textual error may really be only a cover for our failure to understand the language or the idiom Beyond these unrecoverable sorts of errors there are two categories of errors that may be distinguished and often corrected errors due to an unintentional mechanical lapse on the part of the copyist often called Errors of Reading and Writing and two errors that are the result of deliberate alteration called Intentional Alterations a Errors of Reading and Writing 1 Confusion of similar letters In Hebrew there are several letters which look very similar to one another the B and K R and D H and T W and Y 2 Transposition of Letters 3 Haplography a fancy word that means when there were two or more identical or similar letters groups of letters or words all in sequence one of them gets omitted by error Of course there is some evidence that some of these supposed errors are actually equivalent to English contractions like don t instead of do not and therefore are not errors at all 4 Dittography another fancy word that refers to an error caused by repeating a letter group of letters a word or a group of words The opposite really of Haplography 5 Homoioteleuton an even fancier word which refers to the error that occurs when two words are identical or similar in form or have similar endings and are close to each other It is easy in this sort of situation for the eye of the copyist to skip from one word to the other leaving out everything in between A good example of this occurs in 1 Samuel 14 41 Therefore Saul said unto the Lord God of Israel give a perfect lot KJV Therefore Saul said O Lord God of Israel why hast thou not answered thy servant this day If this guilt is in me or in Jonathan my son O Lord God of Israel give Urim but if this guilt is in thy people Israel give Thummim RSV The copyist s eye jumped from the first instance of the word Israel to the last instance leaving out everything in between for the reading that the KJV translators had at their disposal The word translated perfect is spelled with the same consonants in Hebrew TH M M as the word Thummim 6 Errors of Joining and Dividing Words This is more a problem in the New Testament than it is in the Old Testament for while the Greek manuscripts were written well into the Medieval period without spacing or dividing signs between words there is no evidence that this was EVER the case with the Old Testament Hebrew texts In fact the evidence is very strong to the contrary inscriptions on walls from the time of Hezekiah actually had dots between each word to separate them from each other b Deliberate Alterations The Samaritan Pentateuch as an example is notorious for its purposeful changes designed to help legitimize some of their sectarian biases They were sort of like the Jehovah s witnesses of their day A more substantive change in the Hebrew text came after the Babylonian captivity in the time of Ezra fifth century BC when the alphabet changed from the Old Hebrew Script to the Aramaic Square Script in which all copies of the Old Testament except for the Samaritan Pentateuch are written It should not surprise us that there have been a certain amount of alteration in the text over time since the Bible was not intended to be the object of scholarly study but rather was to be read by the whole believing community as God s word to them Thus the text would undergo adaptations to fit the linguistic needs of the community For instance in Isaiah 39 1 the Masoretic Text preserves a rare word hazaq which has the sense of to get well recuperate The community that produced the Dead Sea scrolls altered this word to the more common Hebrew word for get well zayah Other examples of adaptation to colloquial usage are likely The lack of early material for the Old Testament makes it impossible to demonstrate these sorts of alterations on a larger scale But a few small alterations are easily demonstrable The treatment of the divine name Baal is an example of deliberate change for theological reasons In personal names which included the word Baal which simply means master or lord the scribes deliberately replaced Baal with Bosheth which means shame Hence Jonathan s son was actually named Meribbaal rather than Mephibosheth cf 1 Chron 8 34 9 30 and 2 Sam 9 6 19 24 21 7 Another example of deliberate alteration is found in Job 1 5 11 and 2 5 9 where we now read the word berek to bless with God as the object even though we should expect to find the word qalal to curse The scribes replaced the offensive expression to curse God with a euphemism motivated no doubt by their fear of taking God s name in vain III A History of English Bible Translation The first English translation of the Bible was undertaken by John Wycliffe 1320 1384 By 1380 he had finished the translation of the New Testament however his translation of the Old Testament was incomplete at the time of his death Friends and students completed the task after his death His translation was not from the original Greek and Hebrew texts instead he made use of the Latin Vulgate Many translations followed William Tyndale s translation of the Bible again relied heavily on the Vulgate however he was a good Greek scholar and so he did make use of Erasmus Greek text and some other helps that had been unavailable to Wycliffe The New Testament was completed in 1525 and the Pentateuch in 1530 He was martyred before he could complete the Old Testament Miles Coverdale a friend of Tyndale prepared and published a Bible dedicated to Henry VIII in 1535 The New Testament is based largely on Tyndale s version Matthew s Bible appeared in 1537 and its authorship is somewhat unclear it is probable that it was produced by John Rogers a friend of Tyndale Apparently Rogers came into possession of Tyndale s unpublished translations of the historical books of the Old Testament and so included these in this version which again rests heavily on the work of Tyndale as well as Coverdale The Great Bible of 1539 was based on the Tyndale Coverdale and Matthew s Bibles It was a large volume chained to the reading desk in churches and from this fact derives its name The Geneva Bible of 1560 was produced by scholars who fled to Geneva Switzerland from England during the persecution instigated by Queen Mary It was a revision of the Great Bible The Bishops Bible of 1568 was produced under the direction of the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reign of Elizabeth I It is to a large extent simply a revision of the Great Bible with some influence of the Geneva Bible It was used chiefly by the clergy and was unpopular with the average person The Douay Bible was a Roman Catholic version translated from the Latin Vulgate The New Testament was published at Rheims in 1582 and the Old Testament at Douay in 1609 1610 It contains controversial notes and until recently was the generally accepted English version for the Catholic Church The King James or Authorized Version was published in 1611 It was produced by forty seven scholars under the authorization of King James I of England The Bishops Bible served as the basis for this version though they did study the Greek and Hebrew texts and consulted other English translations It was the most popular translation in English for well over three hundred years undergoing at least three revisions before 1800 The New King James Version appeared in 1982 The New Testament had been published in 1979 One hundred nineteen scholars worked on the project sponsored by the International Trust for Bible Studies and Thomas Nelson Publishers They sought to preserve and improve the 1611 version The Revised Version was published between 1881 and 1885 It was made by a group of English and American scholars It was to a large extent a revision of the King James translation though the scholars involved did check the most ancient copies of the original scriptures using manuscripts that were unavailable at the time the King James Version was produced The American Standard Version of 1900 1901 is the American version of the Revised Version with those renderings preferred by the American members of the Revision Committee of 1881 1885 The Revised Standard Version was published in 1952 In 1928 the copyright of the American Standard Version was acquired by the International Council of Religious Education which authorized a revision by a committee of thirty two scholars The New Testament was issued in 1946 the complete Bible in 1952 The copyright is currently owned by the Division of Education of the National Council of Churches of Christ in the United States of America The Revised Standard Version Bible Committee is a continuing body which is both ecumenical and international with active Protestant and Catholic members from Great Britain Canada and the United States Additional revisions were made in the New Testament in 1971 and in 1990 the New Revised Standard Version was issued The Berkeley Version was published in 1959 The New Testament was originally translated into modern English by a single individual Gerrit Verkuyl in 1945 With a staff of twenty translators including professors from various Christian colleges and seminaries all under his direction a translation of the Old Testament was rendered The Amplified Bible appeared in 1965 It was commissioned by the Lockman Foundation and is unusual even idiosyncratic in that it has bracketed explanatory words to try to explain somewhat difficult passages The Jerusalem Bible was published in 1966 It is a Roman Catholic work originally done in French at the Dominican Biblical School in Jerusalem in 1956 The French title was La Bible de Jerusalem The English version was translated from the original Hebrew and Greek texts but it follows the French version on most matters of interpretation It is the only major English translation that makes use of the divine name Yahweh in the Old Testament The translation includes the Apocrypha A revision called The New Jerusalem Bible came out in 1989 The New English Bible was published in 1970 It was produced by a joint committee of Bible scholars from leading denominations in England Scotland Wales and Ireland assisted by the university presses of Oxford and Cambridge Twenty two years were spent in the work of translation with the New Testament arriving in 1961 The full Bible includes the

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  • Bible Survey: Genesis
    part of a system that aims for scientific objectivity moreover there is strong evidence which supports the traditional view of mostly a single author for the Pentateuch For more information check the book by Kikawada and Quinn Before Abraham Was published by Abingdon in 1985 The Book of Genesis I Title The English title comes from the Greek translation of the Old Testament the Septuagint In Hebrew the book s title is taken from the first word in the book bereshit which means in the beginning II Author Moses is traditionally assumed to be the author of the book of Genesis though he is nowhere in scripture specifically identified as its author However the New Testament repeatedly speaks about Moses in the sense of the author of the Torah the Pentateuch the first five books of the Bible which would of course include the book of Genesis For more discussion of the authorship question please see the introduction to the Law III An Outline of Genesis I The Primeval History 1 1 11 26 A Creation of the Universe 1 1 2 4a B Early Humanity 2 4b 4 26 C Antediluvian Age 5 1 6 8 D Noah 6 9 9 29 E The Nations 10 1 11 9 F Shem s Genealogy 11 10 26 II The Patriarchal History 11 27 50 26 A Terah Abraham and Isaac 11 27 25 11 B Genealogy of Ishmael 25 12 18 C Jacob 25 19 35 29 D Esau Summary 36 1 36 8 E Esau Genealogy 36 9 37 1 F Joseph 37 2 50 26 IV Summary of the Most Common Interpretations of the Creation Narrative A Creationism Takes the approach that the six days of Genesis 1 are to be understood as actual twenty four hour days Holds to a basically chronological approach to the creation narrative and believes that the universe as a whole came into being about six thousand years ago Believes that all the fossils were formed at the time of the Great Flood of Noah B Gap Theory Places a gap in the narrative either before Genesis 1 1 or between Genesis 1 1 and 1 2 believes the universe was created approximately twenty billion years ago then suffered a cataclysmic destruction at the time of Satan s rebellion necessitating the reconstruction of the Earth about six thousand years ago The fossil records illustrate the life forms prior to the reconstruction recorded from Genesis 1 2 and following In common with the Creationist perspective it holds that the six days are to be understood as ordinary twenty four hour days C Theistic Evolution Believes that the six days of Genesis should be understood as long periods of time rather than twenty four hour days Believes that God brought the universe into existence about twenty billion years ago and then made use of the evolutionary process to bring forth life over an extended period Does not view the creation narrative as a chronological description

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  • The Book of Exodus
    1 15 21 B Journey to Sinai 15 22 18 27 II Covenant The Result of Salvation 19 1 40 38 A The Giving of the Ten Commandments 19 1 20 21 B Expansion on the Theme of the Ten Commandments 20 22 40 38 IV Questions on Exodus 1 Discuss the dating of the Exodus Be aware of the various positions on the nature and timing of the event 2 Name the ten plagues and discuss their possible relationship to Egyptian deities 3 List the ten commandments and give the reference in Exodus where they can be found 4 Notice the trouble Moses experienced in leading the people out of Egypt and discuss how this relates to doing and knowing God s will 5 Below is an outline of the tabernacle Identify the various parts of it a Bronze altar brasen altar b Bronze basin laver c Table of the Bread of the Presence Table of Shewbread d Golden Lampstand e Altar of Incense f Ark of the Covenant g The Most Holy Place Holy of Holies h The Holy Place 6 What is God s name and when was it first revealed 7 Discuss the incident with the

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  • Bible Survey: The Book of Leviticus
    II Author Moses is traditionally assumed to be the author of the book of Leviticus Please see the discussion at the beginning of Genesis for more information III An Outline of Leviticus I The Law of Sacrifice 1 1 7 38 II The Consecration of the Priests 8 1 10 20 III The Clean and the Unclean 11 1 15 33 IV The Holiness Code 16 1 26 46 V Dedications 27 1 3 Questions on Leviticus 1 Understand and be able to discuss the five major sorts of offerings know when to offer what and the animals that each requires a burnt offering b grain offering c fellowship or peace offering d sin offering e guilt offering 2 Describe the ordination ceremony of the priests 3 Why did Nadab and Abihu die 4 What are the regulations regarding infectious skin diseases Mildew in houses 5 Know and understand the following special holidays give the dates that they are celebrated in both the Jewish and modern calendars a Sabbath b Passover and Feast of Unleavened Bread c Firstfruits d Feast of Weeks e Feast of Trumpets f Day of Atonement Yom Kippur g Feast of Tabernacles Booths 6 Discuss the

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  •