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  • Bible Survey: The Book of Numbers
    word in the book bemidbar which means in the wilderness II The Author Moses is traditionally assumed to be the author of the book of Numbers Please see the discussion at the beginning of Genesis for more information III An Outline of Numbers I The Census 1 1 4 49 II Regulations 5 1 10 10 III The Journey to Canaan 10 11 14 45 IV The Years of Wandering 15 1 19 22 V The Journey Back to Canaan 20 1 36 13 Questions on Numbers 1 Describe the Nazirite vow Which biblical characters took the Nazirite vow 2 What is the test for an unfaithful wife 3 What happened at Taberah 4 What happened at Kibroth Hattaavah 5 What happened to Miriam and Aaron when they opposed Moses because of the Cushite Ethiopian wife he had taken 6 Discuss the initial spying out of the land and the reaction of the people to the report from the spies What was God s response 7 Describe and discuss Korah s rebellion 8 What happened at Meribah 9 Describe and discuss Balak and Balaam 10 Why did the snakes start biting the Israelites What did God do to save them

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/biblesurvey/numbers.htm (2013-12-10)
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  • The Book of Deuteronomy
    III An Outline of Deuteronomy I Preamble 1 1 5 II Historical Prologue 1 6 4 49 III General Stipulations 5 1 11 32 IV Specific Stipulations 12 1 26 19 V Blessings and Cursings 27 1 30 18 VI Witnesses 30 19 20 VII Moses Concluding His Work 31 1 33 29 VIII The Death Of Moses 34 1 12 IV Vassal Treaties The format of Deuteronomy follows the structure of Ancient Near Eastern treaties which were made between greater and lesser powers Israel the lesser power had been freed from bondage as Egypt s vassal and was now voluntarily becoming the vassal of Yahweh Therefore the book of Deuteronomy is a treaty or contract between God and Israel V Outline of a Typical Vassal Treaty of the Fifteenth Century BC I Preamble These are the words II Historical Prologue antecedant history the events which lead to and now form the basis of the treaty III General Stipulations substantive statements regarding the future relationship which is related to the antecedant history and which summarizes the purpose of the specific stipulations which will follow IV Specific Stipulations V Divine Witnesses the gods are called upon to bear witness VI Blessings

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/biblesurvey/deutero.htm (2013-12-10)
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  • Bible Survey: Joshua
    Israelites Also in 5 6 For the Lord had sworn to them that they would not see the land that he had solemnly promised their fathers to give us a land flowing with milk and honey Therefore the use of the first person plural pronoun would seem to indicate that the author of Joshua was an eyewitness to the events described While the book was written by an eyewitness it seems unlikely that this eyewitness was Joshua 15 13 19 and 19 47 contain accounts of the conquest of Hebron by Caleb Debir by Othniel and Leshem by the tribe of Dan Considered alone these conquests could have happened before Joshua died But if these accounts are compared with the parallel accounts of the same conquests in Judges 1 1 15 there can be little doubt that the battles described occurred following Joshua s death The question then arises just how long after Joshua s death was the book written Caleb s conquest of Hebron must have occurred a very short time after Joshua s demise After all Caleb was eighty five years old at this time In addition there seems to be distinct evidence that the book was written before not after the establishment of the monarchy in Israel contrary to what some critics have inferred In Joshua 16 10 the Canaanites are still in Gezer However by the end of David s reign they were gone 1 Kings 9 16 In Joshua 15 63 the Jebusites were still in Jerusalem However when David began to reign over the united kingdom the Jebusites were gone 2 Samuel 5 3 6 9 Furthermore the book of Joshua shows no traces of a later time either in style or content It is closely connected with the Pentateuch in language as well

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/biblesurvey/joshua.htm (2013-12-10)
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  • Bible Survey: The Book of Judges
    c 1075 BC who can be pictured as being the last judge before the beginning of the monarchal period although Samuel and his time do not form part of the story of the book of Judges III An Outline of Judges I The Time of the Elders 1 1 2 10 II The Time of the Judges 2 11 16 31 III A Picture of Anarchy 17 21 Questions on

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/biblesurvey/judges.htm (2013-12-10)
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  • Bible Survey: The Book of 1-2 Samuel
    as such for the purpose of the outline and this introduction II Author The author of the books is unknown though obviously it cannot be Samuel since he is said to have died by 1 Samuel 28 3 III An Outline of 1 2 Samuel I Samuel 1 7 II Saul 8 15 III David Gains the Kingship 16 31 IV David Triumphant 2 Samuel 1 10 V David Recovering 11 24 For further information about the structure of 1 2 Samuel please refer to the article The Thematic Arrangements of Biblical Texts which appeared in Quartz Hill Journal of Theology Questions on 1 2 Samuel 1 Give a brief biography of the following a Eli b Hophni and Phinehas c Samuel d Hannah e Saul f David g Jonathan h Abner i Nathan j Shimei k Mephibosheth l Adonijah m Ishbosheth n Ahithophel o Tamar p Hanun q Joab r Uzzah s Amnon t Asahel u Adoram v Abigail w Nabal x Bathsheba y Uriah z Goliath 2 What is the significance of 2 Samuel 7 3 How did God use David s sins of adultery and numbering the people to further his purposes 4 Where was Eli s

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/biblesurvey/samuel.htm (2013-12-10)
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  • Bible Survey: The Book of 1-2 Kings
    41 and 2 Kings 8 23 for example III Outline I David s Successor 1 1 11 43 A Adonijah 1 1 27 B Solomon 1 28 11 43 II A Kingdom Divided 12 1 2 Kings 16 20 A Rehoboam 12 1 14 31 B Abijah 15 1 8 C Asa 15 9 24 D Nadab 15 25 32 Israel E Baasha 15 33 16 7 Israel F Elah 16 8 14 Israel G Zimri 16 15 20 Israel H Omri 16 21 28 Israel I Ahab 16 29 22 40 Israel J Jehoshaphat 22 41 50 K Ahaziah 22 51 1 18 Israel L Joram 2 1 8 15 Israel M Jehoram 8 16 24 N Ahaziah 8 25 29 O Jehu 9 1 10 36 Israel P Athaliah and Joash 11 1 12 21 Q Jehoahaz 13 1 9 Israel R Jehoash 13 10 13 25 S Amaziah 14 1 22 T Jeroboam II 14 23 29 U Azariah 15 1 7 V Zechariah 15 8 12 W Shallum 15 13 16 Israel X Menahem 15 17 22 Israel Y Pekahiah 15 23 26 Israel Z Pekah 15 27 31 Israel AA Jotham 15 32 38 BB Ahaz 16 1 20 III The Kingdom Falls 17 1 25 30 A Hoshea 17 1 41 Israel B Hezekiah 18 1 20 21 C Manasseh 21 1 18 D Amon 21 19 26 E Josiah 22 1 23 30 F Jehoahaz 23 31 35 I Jehoiakim 23 36 24 7 J Jehoiachin 24 8 25 30 Questions on 1 2 Kings 1 Give a brief biography of the following individuals a Solomon b Jeroboam c Rehoboam d Ahijah e Abijah f Asa g Nadab h Baasha i Elah j Zimri k Omri l Ahab m Elijah n Elishah o

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/biblesurvey/kings.htm (2013-12-10)
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  • Bible Survey: Isaiah
    and to postulate two authors Chapters 1 39 so the theory goes were written by Isaiah son of Amoz in the eighth century BC Chapters 40 66 were then composed by the so called Second Isaiah an anonymous writer living during or shortly after the time of the Babylonian Exile The reasons for this belief in a multiple authorship of Isaiah are as follows a the philosophic denial of the possibility of predictive prophesy b Anti Semitism in 19th century Germany When the theory was developed anti semites had as their goal the elimination of any claim to greatness by Jews and Judaism Therefore they attempted to discredit the reliability and veracity of the Old Testament This point is made by Rachel Margalioth in her book The Indivisible Isaiah New York Yeshiva University Jerusalem Sura Institute for Research 1964 One of the principle incentives for splitting up the book is the anti Semitic factor The German professors Marti Duhm and their colleagues evolved a system proclaiming the true Isaiah who lived in the days of Hezekiah the prophet of doom of the Jewish people der Prophet des Endes dieses Volkes Judas In the opinion of Marti and his colleagues the people of Israel have no future whatsoever in the outlook of the true Isaiah He prophesied utter doom and destruction leaving them no remnant name or vestige Thus all expressions of consolation scattered through the book must necessarily be later additions p 17 c the difference in literary style between chapters 1 39 and chapters 40 66 d theological differences between the two halves 2 The older tradition of course is to accept the claim of authorship for Isaiah and to insist on a single author for the entire book The reasons for rejecting the concept of two Isaiahs are as follows a acceptance of the possibility of predictive prophesy b the subjectivity of the new tradition lacks the firm ground of objective unambiguous fact c unbroken Jewish tradition argues for a single author for the book C Historical Setting If the traditional authorship of Isaiah is accepted it is a compilation of a series of prophesies Isaiah received and committed to writing over the years 740 to 690 BC At the same time he was prophesying in Judah Amos and Hosea were busy in the Northern Kingdom of Israel Micah was writing in the south Isaiah s prophetic work was composed during the reigns of the following kings see 2 Kings 15 8 21 18 Judah Israel Uzziah Azariah 792 740 Jehoash 798 782 Jotham 750 732 Jereboam II 793 753 Zechariah 753 Shallum 752 Menahem 752 742 Pekah 752 732 Pekahiah 742 740 Hoshea 732 723 Ahaz 735 715 Israel Taken Captive Hezekiah 715 686 Manasseh 696 642 D Political Situation 1 Assyria was gaining momentum and strength in the west as a major world power In Isaiah s lifetime the Northern Kingdom of Israel as a separate political entity came to an end Tiglath Pileser III invaded

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/biblesurvey/isaiah.htm (2013-12-10)
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  • Bible Survey: The Book of Jeremiah
    often were nothing of the sort On the contrary they saw themselves as messengers of their God commissioned to convey to the people the word that their God had given them This conviction of theirs whatever we may think of it must be taken with utmost seriousness if we are to understand them Because of their function their word was always a specific word a specific directive to a specific people caught up in the never to be repeated events of a specific and never to be repeated time in their history Moreover it was essentially a word that interpreted events the events through which the people were passing or were about to pass in light of the divine demands and promises And this is why it is only against the background of their times that the sayings of the prophets come alive indeed in many instances make sense at all John Bright Jeremiah the Anchor Bible New York Doubleday 1965 p xxvii Jeremiah ministered during the reigns of Josiah Jehoahaz Jehoiakim Jehoiachin Zedekiah and the governorship of Gedaliah When he began his ministry the Northern Kingdom of Israel had already been in captivity for nearly one hundred years Josiah was attempting to extend his influence over the territory formerly controlled by the north Manasseh s evil reign had ended fifteen years before perhaps when Jeremiah was quite young After Manasseh Amon s reign also evil lasted barely two years Jeremiah s ministry began during the early reformation by Josiah a reformation that was mostly skin deep affecting few beyond his immediate circle It would be five more years before the book of the law would be found by Hilkiah as he was cleaning the temple On the world scene Jeremiah s lifetime was a period of empires jockeying for world domination The Assyrian empire began to disintegrate after the death of Ashurbanipal in 626 BC with the capital Nineveh falling to Nebuchadnezzar in 612 BC In 605 BC Nebuchadnezzar defeated Egypt at Carchemish thus gaining control of all of western Asia In 609 BC Josiah was killed in battle at Megiddo when he foolishly went out to fight Pharaoh Necho Judah at this point became a vassal to Egypt In 606 05 BC Nebuchadnezzar besieged Jerusalem and took many captives Daniel 1 1 In 603 BC Jehoiakim rebelled against Nebuchadnezzar from that time on Babylon Moab and Ammon began systematically dismantling the Jewish state In 597 BC Nebuchadnezzar took Jerusalem bound Jehoiakim and took him to Babylon along with many of the temple vessels In 588 BC Nebuchadnezzar besieged Jerusalem until 586 when famine swept the city Nebuchadnezzar sacked the city and burned it to the ground The temple was destroyed Jeremiah was not the only prophet at this time preaching with him were Zephaniah Habakkuk and Huldah the prophetess in Judah Meanwhile Daniel and Ezekiel were busy in Babylonian captivity To get a good picture of what is transpiring during Jeremiah s prophetic ministry the interested reader should

    Original URL path: http://theology.edu/biblesurvey/jer.htm (2013-12-10)
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