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  • Civility, Legality, and the Limits of Justice | The University of Alabama | School of Law
    Story Civil Rights in the American Story Speakers Knowing the Suffering of Others Speaker List Matters of Faith Matters of Faith Speakers Dissenting Voices Dissenting Voices Speakers Merciful Judgments Transitions Imagining Legality Speech and Silence in American Law Participants Sovereignty Emergency and Legality Participants Legal Doubt Scientific Certainty Participants Imagining a New Constitution Participants Law s History Participants Symposia Podcasts Registration Externships Cross Disciplinary Program Lecture Podcasts Law Journals Civility Legality and the Limits of Justice September 27 2013 University of Alabama School of Law Bedsole Moot Courtroom 140 Speaker List Today we are in another of those eras in which political leaders and commentators periodically bemoan a crisis of incivility Indeed throughout American history the discourse of civility has proven quite resilient and concern for a perceived lack of civility has ebbed and flowed in recognizable patterns Somehow we continue to find ways to talk about civility and to warn of its demise Today uncivil has become synonymous for that horribly dreaded political quality being wholly and closed mindedly partisan Civility is however a notoriously slippery concept As one scholar noted C ivility is concerned with so many different things that it is difficult to specify the range of its applicability Yet however it is defined civility makes a normative claim describing how we should act towards one another But is civility a political virtue in and of itself Or is it as Michael Sandel observed an overrated virtue And if it is any kind of political virtue what are its claims when the pursuit of justice seems to be at odds with the demands of civility Is Randall Kennedy right when he asserts if you are in an argument with a thug there are things much more important than civility In all of this what should the posture

    Original URL path: http://www.law.ua.edu/programs/symposiums/symposium-archives/civility-legality-and-the-limits-of-justice/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Civility, Legality, and the Limits of Justice Speakers | The University of Alabama | School of Law
    of essays by the Rousseau scholar Robert Wokler Princeton University Press 2012 His writings have won various awards including the First Book Prize of the Foundations of Political Theory section of the American Political Science Association His work in the classroom earned him the 2008 Poorvu Family Prize for Interdisciplinary Teaching In the recent past Garsten has served as Director of Undergraduate Studies for Yale s major in Ethics Politics and Economics and the Director of Graduate Studies for the Department of Political Science He is also active in the humanities serving as a member of the Executive Committee for Yale s Humanities Program and a Fellow at the Whitney Humanities Center He is currently the co president of the International Conference on the Study of Political Thought and a Fellow of the National Forum on the Future of Liberal Education His co author will be Teresa M Bejan of Columbia University Leti Volpp University of California Berkeley is the Robert D and Leslie Kay Raven Professor of Law After graduating from Columbia Law School in 1993 Leti Volpp clerked for U S District Court Judge Thelton E Henderson 62 of the Northern District of California and then worked as a public interest lawyer for several years Volpp served as a Skadden Fellow at Equal Rights Advocates and the ACLU Immigrants Rights Project both in San Francisco as a trial attorney in the Voting Section of the U S Department of Justice Civil Rights Division in Washington D C and as a staff attorney at the National Employment Law Project in New York City She began teaching at the American University Washington College of Law in 1998 and visited at UCLA School of Law in 2004 05 She joined the Boalt faculty in 2005 Volpp s numerous honors include two Rockefeller Foundation Humanities Fellowships a MacArthur Foundation Individual Research and Writing Grant and the Association of American Law Schools Minority Section Derrick A Bell Jr Award She has delivered many public lectures including the James A Thomas Lecture at Yale Law School the Korematsu Lecture at New York University Law School and the Barbara Aronstein Black Lecture at Columbia Law School Volpp is a well known scholar in law and the humanities She writes about citizenship migration culture and identity Her most recent publications include Imaginings of Space in Immigration Law in Law Culture and the Humanities 2012 the edited symposium issue Denaturalizing Citizenship A Symposium on Linda Bosniak s The Citizen and the Alien and Ayelet Shachar s The Birthright Lottery in Issues in Legal Scholarship 2011 and Framing Cultural Difference Immigrant Women and Discourses of Tradition in differences A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies 2011 She is the editor of Legal Borderlands Law and the Construction of American Borders with Mary Dudziak Johns Hopkins University Press 2006 She is also the author of The Culture of Citizenship in Theoretical Inquiries in Law 2007 The Citizen and the Terrorist in UCLA Law Review 2002 Feminism versus Multiculturalism in the

    Original URL path: http://www.law.ua.edu/programs/symposiums/symposium-archives/civility-legality-and-the-limits-of-justice/civility-legality-and-the-limits-of-justice-speakers/ (2016-02-12)
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  • The Structure of Standing at 25 | The University of Alabama | School of Law
    of Justice Civility Legality and the Limits of Justice Speakers The Structure of Standing at 25 Judge William A Fletcher The Punitive Imagination The Punitive Imagination Speakers Civil Rights in the American Story Civil Rights in the American Story Speakers Knowing the Suffering of Others Speaker List Matters of Faith Matters of Faith Speakers Dissenting Voices Dissenting Voices Speakers Merciful Judgments Transitions Imagining Legality Speech and Silence in American Law Participants Sovereignty Emergency and Legality Participants Legal Doubt Scientific Certainty Participants Imagining a New Constitution Participants Law s History Participants Symposia Podcasts Registration Externships Cross Disciplinary Program Lecture Podcasts Law Journals The Structure of Standing at 25 Friday February 22 2013 University of Alabama School of Law On Friday Feb 22 2013 renowned standing scholar and University of Alabama School of Law professor Heather Elliott hosted a symposium The Structure of Standing at 25 The symposium is framed as a tribute to Judge William A Fletcher of the U S Court of Appeals of the Ninth Circuit whose groundbreaking article The Structure of Standing was published nearly 25 years ago Judge Fletcher made a devastating critique of standing doctrine in that article and yet standing to sue remains a controversial and crucial threshold doctrine in the federal courts most recently playing a huge role in lawsuits challenging the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Obamacare gay marriage and warrantless wiretapping electronic eavesdropping by the security agencies of the U S government Welcome Ken Randall Dean and McMillan Professor of Law The University of Alabama School of Law Introduction Heather Elliott The University of Alabama School of Law Panel I download audio The Structure of Standing History and Text Robert J Pushaw Jr Restructuring Standing Fortuity and the Article III Case Ernest Young In Praise of Judge Fletcher and of General

    Original URL path: http://www.law.ua.edu/programs/symposiums/symposium-archives/the-structure-of-standing-at-25/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Judge William A. Fletcher | The University of Alabama | School of Law
    Lectures on Equality The Legacy of 1964 Race Gender Inequity 50 Years Later New York Times v Sullivan A World Without Privacy What Can Should Law Do Speakers Civility Legality and the Limits of Justice Civility Legality and the Limits of Justice Speakers The Structure of Standing at 25 Judge William A Fletcher The Punitive Imagination The Punitive Imagination Speakers Civil Rights in the American Story Civil Rights in the American Story Speakers Knowing the Suffering of Others Speaker List Matters of Faith Matters of Faith Speakers Dissenting Voices Dissenting Voices Speakers Merciful Judgments Transitions Imagining Legality Speech and Silence in American Law Participants Sovereignty Emergency and Legality Participants Legal Doubt Scientific Certainty Participants Imagining a New Constitution Participants Law s History Participants Symposia Podcasts Registration Externships Cross Disciplinary Program Lecture Podcasts Law Journals Judge William A Fletcher On February 22 the Law School welcomes Judge William A Fletcher of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit who will give the keynote speech of the symposium The Structure of Standing at 25 The symposium is organized in honor of Judge Fletcher whose influential article The Structure of Standing was published in 1988 in the Yale Law Journal

    Original URL path: http://www.law.ua.edu/programs/symposiums/symposium-archives/the-structure-of-standing-at-25/judge-william-a-fletcher/ (2016-02-12)
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  • The Punitive Imagination | The University of Alabama | School of Law
    Matters of Faith Speakers Dissenting Voices Dissenting Voices Speakers Merciful Judgments Transitions Imagining Legality Speech and Silence in American Law Participants Sovereignty Emergency and Legality Participants Legal Doubt Scientific Certainty Participants Imagining a New Constitution Participants Law s History Participants Symposia Podcasts Registration Externships Cross Disciplinary Program Lecture Podcasts Law Journals The Punitive Imagination Friday September 28 2012 University of Alabama School of Law Bedsole Moot Courtroom 140 Speaker List Podcast Direct Downloads Introduction Session 1 Session 2 Session 3 Session 4 Session 5 Session 6 As is widely known the United States is one of the most punitive nations in the world Our prison and jail population is enormous We lock up more people for longer periods of time than any comparable nation Moreover we remain attached to capital punishment long after most of our peer countries have branded it an abuse of human rights In total our approach to punishment has been aptly labelled harsh justice The purpose of this symposium is to inquire into the cultural conditions and presuppositions that undergird America s approach to punishment and the life of punishment in American culture Among the questions we wish to explore are What assumptions about persons and social institutions provide the basis for American punitiveness How does punishment depend on and influence prevailing views of free will responsibility desert blameworthiness Where how are those views subject to challenge in our punitive practices How is punishment portrayed in popular culture And how do our imaginings of punishment get played out in our practices 8 15 8 30 Welcome and Introduction Dean Kenneth Randall University of Alabama School of Law Dr Austin Sarat Justice Hugo L Black Visiting Senior Faculty Scholar The University of Alabama School of Law and William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science and

    Original URL path: http://www.law.ua.edu/programs/symposiums/symposium-archives/the-punitive-imagination/ (2016-02-12)
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  • The Punitive Imagination Speakers | The University of Alabama | School of Law
    pain Her current project is a volume examining criminological theories through the lenses of popular culture co authored with criminologist Nicole Rafter Dr Brown is a recipient of the University Professor Award and the College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Teacher Award Her work has appeared in American Quarterly Crime Media Culture The Journal of Criminal Justice and Popular Culture and The Prison Service Journal She received her B A in Comparative Literature and Film Studies and her Ph D in Criminal Justice and American Studies at Indiana University Patricia Ewick is Professor of Sociology at Clark University Prof Ewick received a B A from Tufts University in 1976 and a Ph D from Yale in 1985 Her principal research areas include deviance law and social control For the past few years Ms Ewick has been studying legal consciousness among ordinary American citizens in order to identify how when and why people come to define their everyday disputes and troubles as potentially legal matters She is currently studying narrative discourse and collective action Ms Ewick has published three books The Common Place of Law Social Science Social Policy and Law and Law Ideology and Consciousness She is currently writing a book on resistance to the Archdiocese of Boston among Catholic laity She has also published articles in American Journal of Sociology Gender and Society Law and Policy Law and Social Inquiry Law and Society Review The New England Law Journal and Research in Law Politics and Social Control She is the past co editor of Studies in Law Politics and Society and former associate editor of the Law Society Review Leo Katz is Frank Carano Professor of Law at the University of Pennsylvania His work focuses on criminal law and legal theory more generally By connecting criminal law moral philosophy and the theory of social choice he tries to shed light on some of the most basic building block notions of the law coercion deception consent and the use and abuse of legal stratagems among others Katz is the author of several books Bad Acts and Guilty Minds Conundrums of the Criminal Law University of Chicago 1987 Ill Gotten Gains Evasion Blackmail Fraud and Kindred Puzzles of the Law University of Chicago 1996 and most recently Why the Law Is So Perverse forthcoming which he researched with the support of a Guggenheim Fellowship Together with Stephen Morse and Michael Moore he edited Foundations of the Criminal Law Oxford 1999 Caleb Smith is assistant professor of English and American Studies at Yale His research concerns American literary and cultural history with special attention to the relations between social imaginaries and legal institutions He is interested in how literary works produced and received within broader public spheres involve themselves with such problems as punishment secular justice human rights legal personhood and the character of the modern self His first book The Prison and the American Imagination was recently published by Yale University Press His work on John Brown is part of a

    Original URL path: http://www.law.ua.edu/programs/symposiums/symposium-archives/the-punitive-imagination/the-punitive-imagination-speakers/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Civil Rights in the American Story | The University of Alabama | School of Law
    Judgments Transitions Imagining Legality Speech and Silence in American Law Participants Sovereignty Emergency and Legality Participants Legal Doubt Scientific Certainty Participants Imagining a New Constitution Participants Law s History Participants Symposia Podcasts Registration Externships Cross Disciplinary Program Lecture Podcasts Law Journals Civil Rights in the American Story Friday March 8 2013 University of Alabama School of Law Bedsole Moot Courtroom 140 Speaker List American uncertainties and ambivalence about race go at least as far back as Tocqueville s pained observations about the three races in America and their sad inability to live together as equals In the intervening two centuries those uncertainties have not been resolved by civil war legal prescription mass protest or inspiring leadership Today racial conflict between blacks and whites and conflict about race is as vexing as it has ever been Race as Gunner Myrdal reminded us is the American Dilemma Uncertainty is particularly acute in the legal domain where over the last four decades courts and judges have struggled to come to terms with the meaning of the Constitution s guarantee of equal protection of the law In that period the record of judicial interpretation and understanding of racial equality has taken the form of a back and forth movement in which first desegregation then integration with its accompanying need for busing and affirmative action and now color blindness have been the prevailing ideologies In both law and society the meaning of civil rights is hotly debated At the same time Americans take great pride in the progress made in opening up opportunities cross racial lines The purpose of this symposium is to inquire about the place of civil rights in America s post Brown v Board of Education story How important has the story of civil rights progress been in the last half century

    Original URL path: http://www.law.ua.edu/programs/symposiums/symposium-archives/civil-rights-in-the-american-story/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Civil Rights in the American Story Speakers | The University of Alabama | School of Law
    his first book The Color of America Has Changed How Racial Diversity Shaped Civil Rights Reform in California 1941 1978 In March 2011 it received honorable mention from the Organization of American Historians for the Frederick Jackson Turner Award for the best first book dealing with some significant phase of United States history He is currently conducting research for two new books the first on the history of school finance reform and the second on California s Proposition 13 Richard Thompson Ford is George E Osborne Professor of Law at Stanford Law School An expert on civil rights and antidiscrimination law Richard Thompson Ford BA 88 has distinguished himself as an insightful voice and compelling writer on questions of race and multiculturalism His scholarship combines social criticism and legal analysis and he writes for both popular readers and for academic and legal specialists His work has focused on the social and legal conflicts surrounding claims of discrimination on the causes and effects of racial segregation and on the use of territorial boundaries as instruments of social regulation Methodologically his work is at the intersection of critical theory and the law Before joining the Stanford Law School faculty in 1994 Professor Ford was a Reginald F Lewis Fellow at Harvard Law School a litigation associate with Morrison Foerster and a housing policy consultant for the City of Cambridge Massachusetts He has also been a Commissioner of the San Francisco Housing Authority He has written for the Washington Post San Francisco Chronicle Christian Science Monitor and for Slate where he is a regular contributor His latest book is The Race Card How Bluffing About Bias Makes Race Relations Worse Susan Sturm is the George M Jaffin Professor of Law and Social Responsibility and the founding director of the Center for Institutional and

    Original URL path: http://www.law.ua.edu/programs/symposiums/symposium-archives/civil-rights-in-the-american-story/civil-rights-in-the-american-story-speakers/ (2016-02-12)
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