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  • Interdisciplinary Innovation for Food — Institute for Social Sciences
    Coverage About ISS Contact ISS Mission Staff Executive Committee ISS Fellows Affiliated Centers and Programs Research Affiliates You are here Home Events Info Interdisciplinary Innovation for Food With Andrew B Hargadon professor of technology management and Charles J Soderquist Chair in Entrepreneurship in the Graduate School of Management at UC Davis Date Time Feb 03 2016 from 04 10 PM to 05 00 PM Description Part of a series of talks select Wednesdays 4 5pm 1207 RMI South by industry and academic experts engaged in using design thinking and innovation to tackle food system challenges convened by Lauren Shimek Sr Portfolio Director IDEO and Charlotte Biltekoff Associate Professor Food Science and Technology American Studies Coming Fall 2016 FST 298 Design Thinking for Food a new cross disciplinary course for graduate students and select undergraduates to learn and use design thinking to uncover new solutions to high impact food system challenges Contact Name More information about this event iCal Export vCal Export Events Resources Event Co sponsorship Submit Events to the ISS Calendar Submit Events to the ISS Calendar Featured Events The Sheffrin Lecture in Public Policy Noon Lectures 2015 ISS Conference Series More ISS Journal News More Upcoming Social Science

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/events/interdisciplinary-innovation-for-food (2016-01-26)
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  • Migrations of the Mind: David Kyle — Institute for Social Sciences
    process than we have allowed However this is not a purely psychological process of individual brains but rather best described as the intersection of cognition and culture A migrant doesn t just imagine a new life abroad but actually begins a cognitive resettlement before the move and even before a decision to leave Crossing the mental threshold Humans are hardwired for imagination As an evolutionary adaptation the ability to imagine future outcomes and to cognitively locate the body in different places and times enabled humans to not only populate the entire globe including distant Pacific Islands but also to adapt and thrive in their new environments The process of cognitive migration is characterized as mentally experimenting with the physical social and emotional details of a specific future time and place Just as ancient Homo sapiens imagined futures for themselves outside of Africa 150 000 years ago we can plausibly imagine a future human colony on a distant planet like Mars The underlying cognitive process remains the same even though the social cultural and technical contexts could not be more different Migration is not a mere question of imagination Kyle says The concept of cognitive migration is an attempt to sensitize us to the crossing of the mental threshold in which we begin to move from mere imagination to making a place feel real Avoiding loss One of Kyle s most surprising findings though building on the work of a range of scholars is that rather than seeking to remake themselves through migration humans seek familiarity in their new locations A major part of the cognitive migration process is about avoiding loss not just acquiring something better The time place and manner of migration largely depend on what qualities an individual wants to retain rather than replace It s a truism that we take leaps based on perceptions of a future change in status we find desirable Kyle says But for most of us a particular adventure is perceived as compelling only as long as we get to keep those things we value from the origin location and don t have to sever our ties and identities The Pilgrims for example did not venture to the New World in 1620 to become new Americans Rather they migrated in order to practice their existing religion and live according to established English customs Asking new questions Cognitive migration offers important new research possibilities within the interdisciplinary scholarly field of migration studies Historians economists demographers geographers and other social scientists approach the subject of mobility with a remarkably diverse methodological tool kit Using cognitive migration as a theoretical frame empirical researchers may now ask new questions about how the alternative futures imagined by an individual can influence future migratory behavior Kyle posits that future empirical research should focus on those who do not take the path under consideration without assuming a choice was made or considered and foreclosed He believes that UC Davis is uniquely suited to take up such research questions because the

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/iss-journal/features/migrations-of-the-mind-david-kyle (2016-01-26)
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  • Roosevelt and Recovery: Eric Rauchway's The Money Makers — Institute for Social Sciences
    play out Roosevelt could roll with the political punches in order to reach his long term goals In foregrounding FDR s hands on approach to monetary policy Rauchway strives to show Roosevelt in action to show precisely what he said and did and with what immediate as well as long term consequences Roosevelt had a clear vision for global prosperity based on capitalism and democracy but he achieved those goals with a mix of pragmatism and occasional improvisation That nimble approach enabled him to convince British economist John Maynard Keynes that a global shift toward a managed currency was possible As Rauchway explains Keynes likewise possessed an intellect comfortable with improvisation in response to circumstances and was therefore able to appreciate Roosevelt Keynes had theorized that the gold standard was an impediment to global prosperity and had worked out the broad contours of a new worldwide currency system as early as 1930 But Rauchway notes it wasn t until he saw Roosevelt in action in 1933 that he began to believe that it was really possible and to adapt his thinking accordingly From Cash and Carry to Lend Lease Yet it would take another world crisis the Second World War to bring down the last vestiges of the old economic order As the Nazi blitzkrieg consumed Europe in 1940 Roosevelt was running for an unprecedented third term as President Roosevelt viewed Nazism as an existential threat to capitalism and democracy but out on the campaign trail the pragmatic President pledged neutrality to an isolationist American public Behind the scenes Roosevelt looked for ways to assist Britain in its battle against the Nazis Federal law required all international munitions purchases be made in gold under the cash and carry policy of 1939 Having exhausted its gold reserves purchasing munitions from the United States Britain could not hold out indefinitely against the blitz without US aid After Roosevelt won his third term he and Keynes aimed to replace cash and carry with the Lend Lease policy an agreement wherein the US would lend military supplies to the Allies in exchange for leased military bases The value of American manufactured goods in this case munitions was no longer tied to the value of British gold Roosevelt countered Hitler s master plan for a Nazi world order with an alternative postwar vision As Rauchway explains Keynes taking his cue from Roosevelt sketched a plan for a postwar peaceful world economy that would ensure social security around the world by permitting nations to manage the value of their currency in keeping with their domestic needs The President articulated this vision in his 1940 State of the Union Address when he outlined a postwar world built on the Four Freedoms freedom of speech freedom of worship freedom from want and freedom from fear Roosevelt saw freedom from want as a global extension of the New Deal designed to establish the economic security required for lasting peace Freedom from Want was more than a wartime slogan Roosevelt

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/iss-journal/features/roosevelt-and-recovery-eric-rauchways-the-money-makers (2016-01-26)
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  • Looking for Utopia: Smriti Srinivas — Institute for Social Sciences
    a new way Inspired by Scottish sociologist biologist Patrick Geddes to think about utopias not as unattainable no places but as eu topias good places Dr Srinivas explores previously neglected traditions to trace the ways in which people continue to create and maintain such places Those traditions include Scottish bio centric philosophies of design theosophical gardens designs for Vedanta in California and the development of religious sites amidst new infrastructures in Bangalore New modes of thinking Geddes provides more than just a theoretical inspiration for A Place for Utopia A Scottish biologist sociologist urban planner and designer he traveled to India worked with Indian surveyors and wrote perhaps 50 town planning reports on Indian cities A keen interest in ecology and botany informed his thinking as he sought in the interwar period to imagine potential paths out of a dystopic era created by destructive sciences technologies and ideologies For Dr Srinivas Geddes and his interlocutors provide a mode of thinking about what might come next in a dystopic world Eu topias are realized Dr Srinivas writes not through abstract imagined futures but through local citizenship in volunteering for peace in attempts to renew or heal Life whether through gardens or public health and in the revitalization of knowledge and practice Eu topic practices aren t merely about designing new worlds or imagining perfect futures Rather they seek to locate spaces of transformation within existing sites Geddes design practices and the critiques of imperialism that stem from them continue to be crucial for social scientists today While current discussions of utopia are typically located in literary fiction or abstract Western traditions A Place for Utopia focuses instead on South Asian histories of utopia which can also be traced back to Buddhist writings and traditions The book asks where are we already

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/iss-journal/features/looking-for-utopia-smriti-srinivas (2016-01-26)
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  • Solving Food Problems with Design Thinking — Institute for Social Sciences
    levels continue to rise and more than one million people starve in Syria it is clear that the world faces many complex food challenges Hunger security nutrition obesity waste and resource management these Dr Shimek said represent just some of the many problems with which today s food scientists innovators and consumers must contend For Dr Shimek design thinking and the creativity it engenders offers new and fresh ways to think about and maybe even solve these problems Essential empathy Human centered design thinking she said helps designers to identify what people need and desire From there they can determine the viability needs of a given business before moving on to the feasibility of a given project Whether you are a large company striving for contemporary relevance or a start up tinkering with new kinds of food and the technologies required to grown them empathizing with the consumer is essential Design thinking represents a form of collaborative problem solving For IDEO it involves collecting groups of people with different backgrounds anthropology business psychology food science engineering etc and encouraging them to brainstorm solutions to a given set of problems or challenges Essential to the process Dr Shimek emphasized is the group s diversity as well as the willingness of each member to collaborate with and learn from others consumers included Ultimately complex problems like those posed by food can only be solved with bold creative thinking There s sort of a myth that creativity is only for kids or that it s only for people in certain industries she said Design thinking is about unlocking your creative confidence For more information on how design thinking works explore the IDEO projects linked below The next talk will take place on January 27 from 4 00 5 00 p m in 1207

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/iss-journal/news/solving-food-problems-with-design-thinking (2016-01-26)
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  • NEH Awards Fellowship to Hartigan-O'Connor — Institute for Social Sciences
    in establishing the rules of capitalism and reinforced the marginalization of people who performed the bulk of labor and exchange Auctions she contends integrated market and household in explicit ways that put women and social bonds at the center of ideas about exchange and worth America Under the Hammer brings together law business records private letters and print culture to analyze how used and unique goods circulated within a burgeoning commodity culture in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries challenging long held ideas about value The book Hartigan O Connor argues will push past the tendency to conceive of economy and society as separate entities to uncover how that division first emerged by offering a dynamic integrated picture linking the experience of exchange to changing ideas of what an object a body or a life was worth During the NEH award year Hartigan O Connor plans to draft the book manuscript and secure an academic publisher for America Under the Hammer Early findings from the project supported in part from a DHI Faculty Research Seminar on Patronage have been published in Journal of the Early Republic and Early American Studies Hartigan O Connor is also the author of The Ties that Buy Women and Commerce in Revolutionary America University of Pennsylvania Press 2009 a book that traces the lives of urban women in early America to reveal how they used the ties of residence work credit and money to shape consumer culture at a time when the politics of the marketplace was gaining national significance The Ties that Bind reveals that women remained essential economic agents in the period between 1750 1820 and that the marketplace was not male defined nor controlled by men but by networks intermediaries and proxies who were male and female free and enslaved With fellow

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/iss-journal/news/neh-awards-fellowship-to-hartigan-oconnor (2016-01-26)
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  • Symposium Explores Water Wars — Institute for Social Sciences
    Military Authority also issued a directive forbidding Palestinians from accessing the Jordan River and restricting their access to underground aquifers As a result of these policies hundreds of thousands of Palestinians are not connected to a piped water network and have to rely instead on purchasing water via water tankers and rainwater cisterns Extremely vulnerable to state and paramilitary violence these informal water infrastructures are rarely sufficient Israelis are often lauded for their ability to make the desert bloom But Ibrahim s presentation suggests that these tropes and the kinds of policies and collaborations they encourage are flawed if not completely fabricated In the process of making the desert bloom he concluded the Israeli state has dispossessed and exploited hundreds of thousands of Palestinians There can be no viable Palestinian state without securing the Palestinians right to water Perpetuating water wars Kaitlin Reed Yurok and Hupa a doctoral student of Native American studies expanded on this theme by explaining how similar water policies have also been deployed in California in order to dispossess indigenous people and pave the way for agricultural business Focusing primarily on the legal infrastructure that constructs water rights and perpetuates water wars Reed described the ways in which this legal infrastructure has pathologized certain ways of interacting with indigenous land practices while praising industrialized farming This pathologization has been encoded in the dominant legal framework that shapes Western US water law under a doctrine of prior appropriation which simply means that water rights are determined by the priority of beneficial use Because tribes are unable to become senior water rights holders most if not all of what the US deems beneficial is determined by commercial and economic interests Because this legal framework was largely designed to meet the needs of the leading political and economic forces in the Western U S water disputes are largely settled in favor of these interests According to Reed these preferential water rights are part of a deeper epistemological viewpoint in which water is valued monetarily above all else The codification of this viewpoint in U S law and water sciences has meant that other ways of valuing water especially tribal ways simply aren t counted It is important to keep this water scarcity in perspective she said addressing California s current drought The reason most water in the West is already allocated is that irrigated agriculture consumes more than 80 percent of it In effect we do not have a water shortage in the West we have an oversupply of underpriced subsidized water to irrigated farmland By situating California s water infrastructure in its historical and socio economic context Reed challenged prevailing notions of drought and abundance The ways in which we think about the drought is conceptually and materially based on colonial legacies and ongoing dispossessions Any attempt to intervene in Californian or U S hydrological sciences or water politics must account for this Colonial disproportion Gabi Kirk an environmental educator in San Franciso and part of Young Jewish

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/iss-journal/news/symposium-explores-water-wars (2016-01-26)
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  • Legal Geography Colloquium Examines Power of Space — Institute for Social Sciences
    justice racialization of space and contested articulations of rurality john a powell the Robert D Haas Chancellor s Chair in Equity and Inclusion at UC Berkeley opened the symposium with a theoretical overview of the way space creates social hierarchies Professor powell argued that societies construct poverty by creating spaces of concentrated disadvantage that is by confining racial minorities to marginal neighborhoods where opportunities for employment education and housing are scarce This process is reinforced by practices such as racial profiling by police in predominantly white neighborhoods Space thus becomes a means of socially demarcating who belongs and who does not belong Corporate power Professor powell identified four spatial dominions the public the private corporate and non public non private Marginalized individuals undocumented workers the homeless convicts occupy the non public non private sphere as they are denied both public protections and material access to private accommodations For powell the increasing influence of corporate power highlights a growing misalignment in contemporary society The proportional decline in investment in the public sphere further swells the ranks of individuals confined to non public non private spaces By interrogating the very concept of property as well as the spacial and structural arrangements through which it is configured powell s talk foregrounded the major questions that would recur throughout the day s panels He encouraged scholars to think about exactly who benefits from particular spatial configurations and which groups become marginalized The following papers were presented Protecting People Protecting Places Foregrounding Rurality in Environmental Justice Litigation Lisa Pruitt School of Law UC Davis The Racial State of Municipal Governance Policing Bodies and Space for Profit Jodi Rios African American Studies UC Berkeley Nairobi The Colonial City That Never Was Bettina Ng weno African American African Studies UC Davis Chinatown Imaginings Race Gender and Creating

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/iss-journal/news/legal-geography-symposium-examines-power-of-space (2016-01-26)
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