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  • Child Maltreatment, Empathy, and Memory: A Longitudinal Study (2015-16) — Institute for Social Sciences
    pilot data on child maltreatment empathy and memory for federal and foundation grant applications PI Gail Goodman Psychology Collaborators Camelia Hostinar Psychology Center for Poverty Research Donna Shestowsky School of Law Anthony Urquiza School of Medicine Empathy plays an essential role in interpersonal relations including in early attachment between primary caregivers and children and caring for the well being of others A lack of empathy is a definitional feature of psychopathy antisocial tendencies A psychopathological lack of empathy is associated with callous disregard for the well being of others guiltlessness and little appreciation of moral wrongdoing The project advances psychological theory e g childhood trauma effects on empathy and memory and legal mental health application e g deficits in empathy underlying psychopathology and criminal behavior The timing for federal and foundation funding is particularly ripe but pilot data are needed The proposed research builds on a longitudinal study of over 700 children in Chicago who had been removed from home in the 1990s for investigation of child abuse and neglect At that time permission was obtained by the Illinois Juvenile Court and Department of Child and Family Services DCFS to examine the children s memory mental health especially trauma related psychopathology intelligence suggestibility cortisol response and other physiological indices The children s DCFS records and forensic evaluations were also collected The children had been removed from home and were being evaluated in a special medical forensic unit The study was funded by the Administration on Children and Families and resulted in numerous publications The data are unique There is much more of great importance that we can learn from this sample Twenty years later with funding from the National Institute of Justice NIJ and the National Science Foundation NSF Goodman s research team is re contacting the participants now young

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/research/faculty-research/interdisciplinary-research/child-maltreatment-empathy-and-memory-a-longitudinal-study-2015-16 (2016-01-26)
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  • Development of an ERP Outcome Measure for Treatment Studies in Autism Spectrum Disorder (2015-16) — Institute for Social Sciences
    or her to appropriately process and react to that object This project seeks to develop an Event Related Potentials ERP paradigm for measuring gaze following and object processing that is ideal for use as an outcome measure for treatment studies PI Susan Rivera Psychology Collaborator Sally Rogers Psychiatry School of Medicine A toddler can look to her mother s fearful face gazing toward an object in the surrounding environment such as a hot stove and then become more vigilant toward that object In this way differentiating emotions and following gaze can be thought of as essential building blocks to learning about both the emotional and the physical world Typically developing TD infants are able to differentiate emotions in faces and also use emotional gaze cues to guide attention as evidenced by neural ERP and eye tracking methods While gaze following itself is considered a reflexive process children with autism spectrum disorder ASD have been shown to display deficits in emotion recognition and some aspects of gaze following In the current study we will measure emotion recognition gaze following and subsequent object processing in the same paradigm Event Related Potentials ERPs will be recorded during presentations of emotional or neutral faces looking toward novel objects and during the presentation of objects previously cued by emotional or neutral faces In this way we are both measuring the child s ability to follow gaze in the presence of an emotional or neutral face and measuring the function of that gaze following i e how it affects their processing and learning about objects that are being referenced These abilities gaze following emotion processing and object processing are ideal targets for intervention because these skills comprise the most basic components of social learning This project is a new collaboration between Professor Susan Rivera Department of

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/research/faculty-research/interdisciplinary-research/development-of-an-erp-outcome-measure-for-treatment-studies-in-autism-spectrum-disorder-2015-16 (2016-01-26)
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  • Music-evoked remembering in the age of Big Data (2014-15) — Institute for Social Sciences
    a piece of music evokes PI Petr Janata Psychology and the Center for Mind and Brain Collaborators Duncan Temple Lang Statistics and the Data Sciences Initiative Raúl Aranovich Linguistics and Arne Ekstrom Psychology and the Center for Neuroscience Music lies at the heart of cultures and societies around the world intertwining with the lives and personal histories of millions of individuals The fact that concerts routinely attract groups of fans numbering from the tens to tens of thousands bespeaks music s ability to shape social identities Music evoked autobiographical memories MEAMs are considered by most listeners to be a point of emotional attachment not just to the music but to the events people and places those memories comprise Music evoked remembering provides not only a window into the minds of individuals and collective minds of social groups but also a vehicle for mental time travel that bridges the personal past and future The research proposed herein is a small but part of a larger multifaceted and interdisciplinary research agenda The focus of this two year project is to begin mapping the dynamic structure of autobiographical remembering experiences in the human brain The basic idea is this Individuals use a web app to attach hundreds or thousands of memories to pieces of music that have personal relevance Once a suitable number of memories are contributed to an individual s memory scrapbook we use functional magnetic resonance imaging fMRI to record brain activity as a person listens to a large representative sample of the music for which he or she provides memories The aims are much broader than opening up a new frontier of memory research A core objective is a social website that allows for the sharing of memories evoked by music thereby creating a database of immense value for social

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/research/faculty-research/interdisciplinary-research/music-evoked-remembering-in-the-age-of-big-data (2016-01-26)
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  • Political Institutions, Climate Change, and Adaptation in the Agricultural Sector (2014-15) — Institute for Social Sciences
    political institutions affect policy on climate adaptation and whether certain political processes enhance the sustainability of responses in the agricultural sector PI Matthew Shugart Political Science Collaborators Mark Lubell and Robert Hijmans Environmental Science and Policy Although scholars from diverse fields acknowledge that political institutions and policies play a significant role in how farmers react to climate change and resource scarcity the linkages between political institutions policy outputs and farmer response have not been investigated rigorously This project builds on political science research that demonstrates how institutional variation shapes legislative and executive behavior The literature has established that the ways in which collective political actors political parties and individuals chief executives local legislators respond to constituent demands and contextual pressures are conditioned by institutions including electoral rules party systems and executive arrangements These variations affect the access points that private interests have into shaping policy outputs and the design of governmental agencies that allocate scarce resources We expect institutional variation to correspond with differences in policy outputs and ultimately to influence the ability of farmers to adapt to climate stress at local levels Policies that affect their ability to adapt include water management policy crop insurance research services conservation programs drought relief schemes and carbon taxes or credits This project is important because of the urgency of climate change and the lack of understanding of how policy impacts the response of agricultural actors Water scarcity for example is increasingly threatening to the viability of certain crops in many countries especially given rural and urban competition over water allocation Yet predictive models on climate change impacts focus on the increased variability of rainfall and corresponding drought stress and low yields Few models have addressed adaptation of farmers and none of these models have considered the impact of policies that influence farmer

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/research/faculty-research/interdisciplinary-research/political-institutions-climate-change-and-adaptation-in-the-agricultural-sector (2016-01-26)
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  • Gut Microbes and Infant Cognitive Development (2014-15) — Institute for Social Sciences
    collaboration between researchers at the Center for Mind and Brain and the Foods for Health Institute will bring together cutting edge developmental science and biochemistry to examine the connection between maternal and infant nutrition and microbiota on cognitive development This project was funded in January 2015 PI Lisa M Oakes Psychology and the Center for Mind and Brain Collaborators Bruce German Food Science and Technology and the Foods for Health Institute Jennifer Smilowitz Foods for Health Institute Developmental scientists have long been concerned about the mechanisms of brain development Researchers have investigated the roles of external experience such as enrichment or the Mozart effect or maturational processes such as genetic determinants of structural brain development Studies have revealed nutrition is important in brain development Severe undernutrition in protein iron and iodine can have long ranging implications for cognitive and brain development Efforts to supplement such nutrients can have a significant impact on outcomes Recently inroads have been made into understanding the connection between the gut and the brain in general with increasing attention on the microbiota gut brain axis Research has revealed that bacterial colonization of the intestine plays an important and direct role in neurological functioning and has been implicated in psychiatric disorders from anxiety to autism Studies of germ free mice reveal a connection between intestinal microbiota and brain development particularly in hippocampal development Understanding how the microbiota gut brain axis contributes to brain development has broad societal implications Findings that gut microbiota influences cognitive development may inform interventions in at risk populations Just as the work on the role of essential fatty acids contributed to changes in the ingredients in infant formula a deep understanding of other connections between gut and brain may lead to other recommendations and practices regarding infant feeding Findings from such work may

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/research/faculty-research/interdisciplinary-research/gut-microbes-and-infant-cognitive-development (2016-01-26)
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  • Sheffrin Lecture — Institute for Social Sciences
    Public Policy Giving Corporate Bodies Their Due and Only Their Due Philip Pettit 2015 16 Read More Atif Mian 2015 For this year s Sheffrin Lecture the Institute for Social Sciences and the UC Davis Department of Economics welcomed Atif Mian an economist at Princeton University He delivered his lecture What Happened to Global Growth Atif Mian 2015 Read More Sendhil Mullainathan 2014 Sendhil Mullainathan an economist at Harvard University delivered the 2014 Sheffrin Lecture Scarcity A Talk for People Too Busy to Attend Talks Sendhil Mullainathan 2014 Read More Gary C Jacobson 2013 Gary C Jacobson a distinguished professor of political science at the University of California San Diego delivered the 2013 Sheffrin Lecture Partisan Polarization in American Politics Gary C Jacobson 2013 Read More Doug Massey 2012 Doug Massey the Henry G Bryant Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at Princeton University s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs delivered the 2012 Sheffrin Lecture The Paradoxical Origins of America s War on Immigrants Doug Massey 2012 Read More Peter Galison 2011 Peter Galison the Pellegrino University Professor of the History of Science and of Physics at Harvard University delivered the 2011 Sheffrin Lecture Secrecy Espionage Act

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/research/iss-lecture-series/sheffrin-lectures/sheffrin-lecture (2016-01-26)
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  • ISS Noon Lecture - New Results on Head Start's Impact — Institute for Social Sciences
    this ISS Noon Lecture Doug Miller discussed his ongoing research on Head Start and evaluated his recent findings This lecture was co sponsored by the Center for Poverty Research Date Time Apr 15 2015 from 12 10 PM to 01 00 PM Location Memorial Union II UC Davis Description Doug Miller is an Associate Professor of Economics at UC Davis He received his Ph D in Economics from Princeton University in 2000 He is a research affiliate of the Center for Poverty Research at UC Davis and serves as a Research Associate for the National Bureau of Economic Research Miller s research examines the impact of economic forces social policy and the environment on health He has measured the effects of business cycles inheritances Head Start the Earned Income Tax Credit and air pollution on infant child and adult health He works in the area of applied econometrics using and building tools for measuring casual effects and for conducting accurate statistical inference He also has research interests in development economics Download the event flyer Contact Name Lauren Thomas 530 752 2070 More information about this event iCal Export vCal Export Filed under Noon Lectures Events Resources Event Co sponsorship Submit

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/events/noon-lecture-new-results-on-head-starts-impact (2016-01-26)
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  • ISS Noon Lecture - The Tupac Amaru Rebellion (1780-83) and the Long History of Violence in the Andes — Institute for Social Sciences
    In this ISS Noon Lecture Chuck Walker presented his argument on 18th century violence and discussed the Shining Path and contemporary Peru This lecture was co sponsored by the Hemispheric Institute on the Americas Date Time Mar 11 2015 from 12 10 PM to 01 00 PM Location Memorial Union MU II Description Chuck Walker is a professor of history at UC Davis and director of the Hemispheric Institute on the Americas His research focus includes Latin American social cultural and intellectual history Peru and the Andes the history of catastrophes and natural disasters earthquakes the Tupac Amaru Rebellion and Truth Commissions His new book The Tupac Amaru Rebellion Harvard 2014 immerses readers in the rebellion s guerrilla campaigns propaganda war and brutal acts of retribution The book examines why a revolt that began as a multiclass alliance against European born usurpers degenerated into a vicious caste war and left a legacy that continues to influence South American politics today The Tupac Amaru Rebellion was named one of the top books of the year in history by the Financial Times Download the event flyer Contact Name Lynn Park More information about this event iCal Export vCal Export Filed under Noon

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/events/noon-lecture-the-tupac-amaru-rebellion-1780-83-and-the-long-history-of-violence-in-the-andes (2016-01-26)
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