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  • ISS Noon Lecture - Casualties of Social Combat: School Networks of Peer Victimization and their Consequences — Institute for Social Sciences
    Combat School Networks of Peer Victimization and their Consequences Sociology Associate Professor Robert Faris and Diane Felmlee Professor of Sociology at Pennsylvania State University and Research Professor at UC Davis presented their work on the emergence of conflict links between social networks and interpersonal processes underlying aggression In their talk which took place on December 10 2014 Faris and Felmlee in part discussed their findings that the children most at risk of aggression faced it from their friends or former dating partners See more photos of the event Robert Faris research uses social network analysis to examine the emergence of conflict aggression and other social problems His current projects include a longitudinal study of the interplay of adolescent romantic relationships friendships and aggression and a semantic network analysis of cyberbullying He is also investigating how collaboration networks and differences in prestige influence the emergence of scientific disputes among physicists Diane Felmlee is Professor of Sociology at Pennsylvania State University Research Professor at UC Davis and a visiting professor at the Naval Postgraduate School Monterey Her research addresses links between social networks and interpersonal processes such as those involved in friendships intimate relationships and aggressive ties Her current work examines the

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/research/iss-lecture-series/noon-lectures/casualties-of-social-combat-school-networks-of-peer-victimization-and-their-consequences (2016-01-26)
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  • ISS Noon Lecture - 2014 in the Rear View Mirror: What Have We Learned — Institute for Social Sciences
    Research Affiliates You are here Home Impact Lecture Series Noon Lectures Info ISS Noon Lecture 2014 in the Rear View Mirror What Have We Learned To launch the Institute for Social Sciences Noon Lectures Department of Political Science Professor Benjamin Highton and Distinguished Professor Robert Huckfeldt presented an analysis of the 2014 midterm elections In their talk which took place on November 12 2014 Highton and Huckfeldt discussed the implications these mid term elections have for California and the 2016 presidential race See more photos of the event Benjamin Highton is a Professor of Political Science at UC Davis He joined the department in 1999 Previously he worked in Washington DC as an APSA Congressional Fellow His research and teaching interests include American national politics political behavior elections public opinion and research methods He is a contributor to The Washington Post s Election Lab which forecasts the outcomes of U S House and Senate elections Robert Huckfeldt is a Distinguished Professor of Political Science at UC Davis His primary research interests lie in participation communication and decision making The unifying focus of his work is on individuals who are imbedded within social contexts and connected to one another through networks

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/research/iss-lecture-series/noon-lectures/2014-in-the-rear-view-mirror (2016-01-26)
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  • Gary King, 2015 — Institute for Social Sciences
    8 2015 Gary King Albert J Weatherhead III University Professor at Harvard University delivered the inaugural ISS Distinguished Lecture King s talk was entitled Explaining Systematic Bias and Nontransparency in US Social Security Administration Forecasts Gary King is the Albert J Weatherhead III University Professor at Harvard University He is based in the Department of Government in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and serves as Director of the Institute for Quantitative Social Science King develops and applies empirical methods in many areas of social science research focusing on innovations that span the range from statistical theory to practical application King s more than 150 journal articles 20 open source software packages and eight books span most aspects of political methodology many fields of political science and several other scholarly disciplines His work on legislative redistricting has been used in most American states by legislators judges lawyers political parties minority groups and private citizens as well as the U S Supreme Court His work on inferring individual behavior from aggregate data has been used in as many states by these groups and in many other practical contexts His contributions to methods for achieving cross cultural comparability in survey research have

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/research/iss-lecture-series/distinguished-lectures/gary-king-2015 (2016-01-26)
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  • Ethnography and Care-full Description — Institute for Social Sciences
    to a ruler in other words the category of ruler nevertheless continues to act on our relation with the ruler as social scientists The workshop concluded with students sharing their thoughts on the simultaneous productiveness and limitations of social categories Rather than bemoan our inability to listen outside of categories what would it look like to listen both inside and outside these categories Can we listen without fixing them Can we be co thinkers with those we are listening too even if they are rulers Can we approach different genres of listening as opportunities to learn different kinds of things and not just limitations In order to further explore the questions with which we ended our first meeting the second workshop turned to the question of sound and the ways in which we as social scientists can pay better attention to the sounds that escape our listening 2 Sound Is there supposed to be sound Introductory exercise Reflect on a sound that reminds you of Davis or a sound that you recorded during your fieldwork Attempt to locate listen to and absorb this particular sound or soundscape Experiment with different forms of attention and inattention What sounds do you perceive when you are busy or distracted typing reading or looking at your phone What differences do you perceive when you look at your environment If you are around people how do their gestures influence your perception of their voices or the conversation Listen to volume rhythm and cadence Attempt to focus on different elements foregrounding and backgrounding different sounds Close your eyes and listen for a couple minutes Reflect on how different modes of attention influence your listening perception and experience These were the questions explored by Alexandra Lippman in her workshop on sound on October 21st Currently a postdoctoral scholar at UC Davis Science and Technology Studies program Dr Lippman s research explores how globalizing alternative intellectual property practices and technological changes impact creativity access to knowledge media and music Dr Lippman s workshop shed light on what thinking through and with sound as an ethnographic method could contribute to social science research In particular we focused on the ways in which sound as a category can be mobilized politically and epistemologically In other words how does what we hear or what we don t hear open up another way to think about space and politics A key question for the seminar was how noise is different categorically than sound or music and how we as social science researchers both make and respond to the categories that differentiate noise from sound At stake here for social science research is the fact that only some things are allowed to become recognizable or identifiable as something to pay attention to Most things disappear into the background of noise What would it take to foreground both noise and sound as well as the categories we leverage to make sense of them as a site of research and not just the background to

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/research/Proseminars/ethnography-and-care-full-description-fall-2015-winter-2016 (2016-01-26)
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  • Mining the Social Web: Crowdsourcing Autobiographical Memory Research in the Age of Big Data — Institute for Social Sciences
    Web Crowdsourcing Autobiographical Memory Research in the Age of Big Data This Fall 2015 Proseminar is led by ISS Fellows Petr Janata Professor of Psychology and Duncan Temple Lang Professor of Statistics Its theme and specific topics are designed to appeal to students who want to participate in the emerging and high growth area of mining the social web and text analysis It addresses the critical nature of graduate and undergraduate training at the intersection of technology data analysis and domain specific content The age of the Internet has enabled and augmented modes of social interaction and knowledge sharing The World Wide Web is a fertile playground for social science research and a meeting place for the social sciences humanities and mathematical sciences and engineering in particular statistics and computer science The aims of this proseminar are 1 to engage students in thinking about the opportunities and challenges that the social web may provide their research and 2 to give them a cursory introduction to the concepts and tools that have emerged for structuring mining analyzing and visualizing the social web These include data access scraping and Web APIs text processing networks and graphs structured semantic content data analysis and

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/research/Proseminars/mining-the-social-web-crowdsourcing-autobiographical-memory-research-in-the-age-of-big-data (2016-01-26)
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  • Dissertation Retreat, 2016 — Institute for Social Sciences
    to advanced doctoral candidates in the humanities and social sciences at UC Davis Submission deadline Thursday February 25 2016 When Friday April 8 and Saturday April 9 2016 Where Granlibakken Resort in Tahoe City Lake Tahoe CA All meals and lodging are included in the award Transportation will be coordinated for participants if they so desire APPLY NOW A total of 12 students will be selected to participate in this workshop which will be co led by David Biale Director of DHI and Joe Dumit Director of ISS Participants will be paired in advance of the retreat and will read a selection no more than 25 pages of their partner s work At the retreat they will present each other s work followed by general discussion with the entire group The aim of the workshop is to provide feedback and guidance on student projects as well as broaden each participant s intellectual cohort Students from all disciplines may find that the opportunity to present their work in this interdisciplinary setting will reaffirm the cohesiveness and legibility of their research especially to a broader audience The Dissertation Retreat is open to advanced graduate students from the humanities and the social sciences We will consider applications not only from students in the College of Letters and Science but also from those in social sciences and humanities related disciplines from across campus Applicants must have their dissertation proposals approved Dissertation Retreat applications must include Project Description max 1 500 words Please begin this section with your name department and email address as a header The narrative should include the project title overview methodology and its significance to a field s in the humanities and or social sciences The proposal should be written to appeal to readers outside of the applicant s field A

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/opportunities/graduate-student-funding/dissertation-retreat (2016-01-26)
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  • Apply for Dissertation Retreat — Institute for Social Sciences
    You are here Home Opportunities Graduate Student Support Info Apply for Dissertation Retreat Name E Mail Address Telephone number Department Advisor s Project Description Max 1 500 words Please include your name department and email address as a header The narrative should include the project title overview methodology and its significance to a field s in the humanities and or social sciences It should be written to appeal to readers

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/opportunities/graduate-student-funding/apply-for-dissertation-retreat (2016-01-26)
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  • NSF Science, Technology, and Society (STS) Research Grants, Scholars Awards, and Conference and Workshop Support — Institute for Social Sciences
    and August 3 annually thereafter STS researchers strive to understand how STEM fields contribute to the development and use of systems of knowledge the production and use of materials and devices the co evolution of socio technical systems and their governance and the place of science and technology in the modern world STS research endeavors to understand how scientific knowledge is produced and sanctioned and how it is challenged and changes It explores broader societal ramifications and underlying presuppositions STS research studies how materials devices and techniques are designed and developed how and by whom they are diffused used adapted and rejected how they are affected by social and cultural environments and how they influence quality of life culture and society STS research explores how socio cultural values are embedded in science and technology and how issues of governance and equity co evolve with the development and use of scientific knowledge and technological artifacts STS researchers make use of methods from a variety of disciplines including anthropology communication studies history philosophy political science and sociology STS research includes interdisciplinary studies of ethics equity governance and policy issues STS studies may be empirical or conceptual The STS program supports proposals across the broad spectrum of STS research areas topics and approaches Examples include but are by no means limited to Societal aspects of emerging high tech technologies e g nanotechnology synthetic biology neuroscience robotics drones ubiquitous computing crowd sourcing remote sensing Societal aspects of emerging low tech technologies e g paper microscopes whirlwind wheel chairs Issues relating to equity ethics governance sustainability public engagement user centeredness and inclusiveness Integration of traditional STS approaches with innovative perspectives from the arts or humanities Ethical policy and cultural issues regarding big data surveillance and privacy in an increasingly networked world and The science of

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/resources/extramural-funding-opportunities/grants/nsf-science-technology-and-society-sts-research-grants-scholars-awards-postdoctoral-fellowships-doctoral-dissertation-research-improvement-grants-and-conference-and-workshop-support (2016-01-26)
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