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  • NEH Fellowships — Institute for Social Sciences
    You are here Home Resources Grants Calendar Info NEH Fellowships Fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities NEH support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars general audiences or both Projects may be at any stage of development Deadline April 28 2016 Recipients usually produce articles monographs books digital materials archaeological site reports translations editions or other scholarly resources in the humanities For more information

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/resources/grants/neh-fellowships (2016-01-26)
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  • American Sociological Association Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline — Institute for Social Sciences
    International Data ISS Journal News Features Videos Press Coverage About ISS Contact ISS Mission Staff Executive Committee ISS Fellows Affiliated Centers and Programs Research Affiliates You are here Home Resources Extramural Funding Opportunities Grants Info American Sociological Association Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline The American Sociological Association invites submissions by Ph D sociologists for the Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline FAD awards Deadine June 15 2016 Supported by the American Sociological Association through a matching grant from the National Science Foundation the goal of this project is to nurture the development of scientific knowledge by funding small groundbreaking research initiatives and other important scientific research activities such as conferences FAD awards provide scholars with small grants 7 000 maximum for innovative research that has the potential for challenging the discipline stimulating new lines of research and creating new networks of scientific collaboration The award is intended to provide opportunities for substantive and methodological breakthroughs broaden the dissemination of scientific knowledge and provide leverage for acquisition of additional research funds For more information visit the American Sociological Association Filed under Grant Calendar ISS Journal News More Upcoming Social Science Events Modern Iranian Women Writers Shaping the Cultural

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/resources/extramural-funding-opportunities/grants/american-sociological-association-fund-for-the-advancement-of-the-discipline-deadines-december-15-june-15 (2016-01-26)
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  • Smith Richardson Foundation Strategy and Policy Fellows grants — Institute for Social Sciences
    are here Home Resources Grants Calendar Info Smith Richardson Foundation Strategy and Policy Fellows grants The Smith Richardson Foundation sponsors an annual grant competition to support young scholars researching American foreign policy international relations international security military policy and diplomatic and military history Young scholars and policy thinkers from academic institutions and think tanks may apply for these grants to support Strategy and Policy Fellows Only single author book projects will be supported Deadline anticipated June 15 2016 From the Smith Richardson Foundation SRF website The purpose of the program is to strengthen the U S community of scholars and researchers conducting policy analysis in these fields The Foundation will award at least three research grants of 60 000 each to enable the recipients to research and write a book Within the academic community this program supports junior or adjunct faculty research associates and post docs who are engaged in policy relevant research and writing Within the think tank community the program supports members of the rising generation of policy thinkers who are focused on U S strategic and foreign policy issues Applicants must be an employee or affiliate of either an academic institution or a think tank For more

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/resources/grants/smith-richardson-foundation-strategy-and-policy-fellows-grants (2016-01-26)
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  • NSF Science, Technology and Society (STS) Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants — Institute for Social Sciences
    Committee ISS Fellows Affiliated Centers and Programs Research Affiliates You are here Home Resources Extramural Funding Opportunities Grants Info NSF Science Technology and Society STS Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants NSF STS Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants DDRIGs provide funds for dissertation research expenses not normally available through the student s university Deadline August 3 2016 August 3 annually thereafter DDRIG proposals should be prepared in accordance with the guidelines for regular research proposals specified in NSF s Proposals and Awards Policies and Procedures Guide PAPPG The Project Description should not exceed 10 pages and should describe the scientific significance of the work including its relationship to other current research and the design of the project in sufficient detail to permit evaluation It should present and interpret progress to date if the research is already underway Only doctoral students who are enrolled in graduate programs at US graduate research institutions are eligible to apply Doctoral students must have passed the qualifying exams have completed all course work required for the degree and have official approval of the dissertation topic prior to receiving the award For more information visit the NSF STS Program Filed under Grant Calendar Funding Opportunities Graduate Student

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/resources/extramural-funding-opportunities/grants/nsf-science-technology-and-society-sts-doctoral-dissertation-research-improvement-grants-and-conference-and-workshop-support (2016-01-26)
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  • Describing Colonial Art: Almerindo Ojeda — Institute for Social Sciences
    cave But look closely at the painting notice how Catherine s cloud seems to be conveyed by a rainbow Official hagiographies of Catherine s life make no mention of a rainbow but its inclusion in this Peruvian painting represents more than mere creative license by its unnamed artist likely a Native American or mestizo Basing the painting on a 1607 Flemish engraving by Isaac Briot the artist who had presumably never been to Sienna interpreted the jets of air showing the motion of the cloud as a rainbow injecting indigenous creativity into a visual narrative that was otherwise carefully controlled by the heavy hand of the Spanish Inquisition By matching the original Flemish engraving to the painting it inspired in Arequipa the PESSCA project allows scholars to delineate an indigenous worldview concealed in the vivid colors and textures of colonial art Describing what we see Professor Ojeda was born in Peru and describes himself as a discreet collector of Old Master engravings To tease out the stories embedded within colonial paintings he adopted a descriptive rather than a prescriptive view of art Our job as historians is not to say what good art is or to limit ourselves to it but just to describe the art that we see In this way the image of St Catherine s rainbow might speak to the sanctity of the rainbow in Andean cosmology that predated Spanish colonialism as much as it reveals the complex networks of exchange and visual culture in the Spanish empire The Andean rainbow juxtaposed with an Italian saint testifies to the ways visual culture allowed different dialects of the same artistic language to coexist within one image Digital opportunities While the engraving of St Catherine is just one of three thousand already identified in the PESSCA archive Ojeda conservatively estimates this represents less than one percent of colonial paintings in Latin American churches and monasteries The largest online archive of its kind in the world with a global network of collaborators and a partnership with the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú the PESSCA is already a monumental scholarly achievement in the digital social sciences and humanities New technology will enable the archive to further blur the disciplinary boundaries between the humanities and the social sciences Ojeda has teamed up with Carl Stahmer director of Digital Scholarship at UC Davis In collaboration with ISS Ojeda and Stahmer are partnering to integrate Arch V visual recognition software into the PESCCA database This advanced software not only allows researchers to run advanced image searches a search that would enable a scholar to cross reference St Catherine s rainbow with thousands of other archived images but also facilitates new opportunities for crowdsourcing new content in an age of smartphones and digital archives Collaborators around the world can submit images for analysis and run computational analyses of various sorts such as tracking the flow the images across time and to visually map relationships between images This collaboration in turn will create new opportunities for

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/iss-journal/features/ojeda (2016-01-26)
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  • Separating GMO Fiction from Fact — Institute for Social Sciences
    I think societies need to know all the details about the science underlying a new technology like crop genetic engineering in order to decide how to most safely effectively and sustainably utilize it I started a blog www biotechsalon com a few years ago to bring to light some of the facts about agricultural biotechnology that I felt some of the more ardent supporters of the technology were neglecting to mention What sort of facts are you referring to What are GE proponents not telling us about so called GMOs One often hears about how precise genetic engineering is but not about its imprecise attributes like the fact that genetic engineers have no control over where in a plant s genome their foreign genes will land and that those genes often 27 63 percent of the time land in one of the recipient plant s genes in which case that plant gene becomes mutated As another example when using one of the two primary techniques for inserting foreign genes into crop plants considerably more DNA than what is meant to be inserted can sometimes 20 percent of the time become inserted into the recipient plant This fact which colleagues of mine at Calgene and I published in 1994 was particularly shocking to me because we had assumed that the insertion of such extra DNA would not occur and we had only looked for the additional DNA because scientists at the U S Food and Drug Administration FDA asked us to do so Additionally it is a fact that the coordinated framework for regulating GE crops and foods in anticipation of commercializing them in the U S has so many loopholes that it is possible depending on how a GE food crop has been designed to bring a GE food to market without FDA USDA or EPA regulation Thankfully the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the Executive Office of the President together with the FDA have put together a committee to clarify current roles and responsibilities described in the Coordinated Framework for the regulation of biotechnology and develop a long term strategy for the regulation of the products of biotechnology Hopefully the U S system for regulating the products of genetic engineering will be vastly improved upon as a result of that committee s work You mentioned your work with the GE Flavr Savr TM tomato a product that was labeled in grocery stores as Grown from Genetically Modified Seeds How do you believe GE products should be labeled Is there sufficient regulation on this front When it comes to GE crops and foods I feel that there is generally not sufficient regulation in the United States I also believe that GE products should be labeled because 1 U S companies currently have to label their GE crops and foods in order to sell them in the more than 60 countries around the world which require those products to be labeled 2 the vast majority of Americans 80 90

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/iss-journal/features/separating-gmo-fiction-from-fact (2016-01-26)
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  • Reversing the Gaze: Sunaina Maira — Institute for Social Sciences
    psychology that explore the production and policing of that category they are also profoundly personal Surprised to find out that many of these students grew up together in the South Bay Dr Maira was compelled to explore the complex negotiations these students must make as they move between these spaces For them the UC Davis campus does not exist in vacuum The violence faced by their extended families in Pakistan or Palestine is connected to the kinds of surveillance they face in the South Bay which in turn is connected to their experiences at UC Davis How do these students The 9 11 Generation asks forge solidarities across ethnic racial religious and geographic divides Typically the answer is through collective rights based advocacy work and activism often in opposition to the War on Terror But even as they engage in such critical and oppositional actions they inevitably run up against the fundamentally limiting institutionalized human rights apparatus established by European politicians after World War II Limits of liberal empathy The 9 11 Generation highlights the cases of mobilization against military violence in Palestine Afghanistan and Pakistan and anti war and anti colonial solidarity activism undertaken by young people in the South Bay and at UC Davis Such cases are typically read as humanitarian problems an interpretation that Dr Maira finds to be profoundly depoliticizing not least because liberal empathy extends only rarely to certain racialized groups As a result whenever young people try to talk about the effects of the War on Terror about Afghans killed by US drones or Palestinians killed by U S funded military technology rights based discourse proves inadequate In some cases particularly when it comes to Palestine rights based activism is also repressed and stifled in the U S For Dr Maira s young subjects this exceptionalization of Palestine as well as the widespread surveillance and repression of Palestine solidarity work in the Bay is educational highlighting the deep contradictions inherent to the rights based agenda For example though rights based discourses are fundamentally compromised and limiting they are also especially when repressed the best tools they have Family tree of research As her project deepened Dr Maira continued to work with the students by which it had first been inspired They became in effect her co researchers They interviewed other young people from their social networks came up with their own questions and wrote up their own analyses This project is really driven by UC Davis students Dr Maira says As a result it took on a life of its own As these students interviewed other young people these young people would in turn want to become research assistants in the project and conduct their own interviews It became a family tree of research that grew over several years Muslim American youth is a community that has been over researched and over studied Dr Maira says I think they wanted to reverse that gaze for once to take control of the research project It

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/iss-journal/features/reversing-the-gaze-sunaina-maira (2016-01-26)
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  • Challenging the Construction of Ethiopia's Gibe III Dam — Institute for Social Sciences
    grid rural areas However there has been no agreed upon environmental and social impact assessment study A governmental commitment to full assessment prior to construction in 2006 was ignored and the document finally produced in 2008 has been widely criticized Further there is increasing concern that biofuels may in the long run increase global carbon emissions as land converted to biofuel production must be deforested Human rights The Omo Valley has long been a site for the oppression of indigenous people In the 1960s and 1970s national parks were established in the area with no provision for indigenous management of the parks resources In the 1980s large sections of indigenous territory were sold to foreign companies and governments for cash crop and biofuel production The Gibe III will capitalize on these cash crop opportunities All 200 000 indigenes spanning eight ethnic groups the Mursi Bodi Kwegu Karo Hamer Suri Nyangatom and Daasanach will be resettled There will also be drastic repercussions for the several hundred thousand pastoralists in Kenya s Lake Turkana basin The Ethiopian government has promised schools housing irrigation and food aid for the resettled groups but there is little evidence of these commitments being honored Furthermore the 150 000 full and part time jobs promised by the government are likely to consist primarily of underpaid seasonal labor in the sugar plantations These human rights violations are likely to affect the relationship between Kenya and Ethiopia Kenya s northern lands are unstable due both to the Somalian refugee crisis and the April 2015 attacks by al Shabaab in Garissa Ethiopia too is sensitive to political instability in part as a result of ISIS s massacre of Ethiopian Christians in the same month While relations between Kenya and Ethiopia are generally positive the Gibe III dam is likely to exert social and ecological strain that could galvanize further uncertainty catalyzing conflicts and increasing membership of extremist organizations Opposition The Gibe III project has not gone without opposition But the Ethiopian government has done its best to silence any critics using oppressive tactics such as beatings arbitrary detention and arrest rape and murder Anything other than outright support for the project is met with intimidation and violence Trials are held in which the defense does not speak a common language with the prosecution giving them little opportunity to understand the accusations made against them let alone defend themselves Furthermore the Ethiopian government prohibits outside organizations from coming to aid Omo communities Numerous organizations including USAID and local aid providers claim to have assessed the degree of human rights abuse in Ethiopia but few conclusive reports have been made public For example USAID denied any abuses in Ethiopia but also acknowledged that their investigation was neither in depth nor representative These paradoxical claims underscore the lack of transparency in analyzing the future effects of Gibe III and the reliance of organizations like USAID on scant inconsistent or biased information to determine the necessity of aid Local groups are also being threatened

    Original URL path: http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/iss/iss-journal/features/challenging-the-construction-of-ethiopia2019s-gibe-iii-dam (2016-01-26)
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