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  • State Fellowship | California Sea Grant
    regions and neighborhoods close to agency offices Answers the major questions previous Fellows had asked With contributions from State Fellow alumni this guide offers insight and experiences from those who have lived through it Direct Deposit Form Direct Deposit Form Tax Information State Fellow Tax Information Exit and Education Report State Fellows are required to submit a mentor plan in lieu of an annual report Travel Reimbursement Form State Fellow

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/fellowships/managing-your-fellowship-award/state-fellowship (2015-06-03)
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  • Professional Development Group Nurtures A Love for Science Communication | California Sea Grant
    its inception watching it grow to a thriving community of dedicated students and researchers I took a lot of lessons from this process Foremost I learned to collaboratively set realistic objectives and understand how to measure success in meeting those objectives We strove to incorporate ideas from a diverse community including first year graduate students advanced post docs and faculty from our institutions and we were able to build to programming that was relevant and exciting to all One of my favorite courses was the now yearly Science Communication course where we talked with professional writers and journalists about science journalism and communication and practiced speaking about our research topic in ways that could be understood by a range of audiences In the dredges of completing one s thesis the topic is often no longer exciting and often the explanation is full of seemingly random scientific words strung together I took this Communication course twice because it allowed me to think and talk about my work in new and exciting ways I finished my PhD in the summer of 2015 with no job lined up I wasn t convinced I wanted to stay in academia and did not pursue post doc opportunities Luckily my MARINE networking came in handy and I remembered that a fellow liaison had done an awesome fellowship with California Sea Grant I applied for the program and was accepted to start in January 2015 The California Sea Grant State Fellowship takes Masters and PhD level scientists and places them at California state agencies that focus on natural resource protection The process is competitive and we met in Sacramento to interview with all 16 host agencies A comparison to speed dating would not be incorrect After the grueling matching process I was placed at the State Coastal

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/fellowships/fellows-blog/professional-development-group-nurtures-a-love-for-science-communication (2015-06-03)
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  • From Divemaster to D.C. | California Sea Grant
    how much policy affects conservation Economics affect conservation Science affects conservation Communication affects conservation said Bowman There are a lot of elements in a successful conservation campaign Scripps really taught me that Bowman says she adored her time at Scripps where she learned from some of the top minds in ocean science interacted with brilliant people and was given the flexibility to learn and grow as an ocean science professional Scripps immerses you into a world of people who want to understand our world and make it a better place explained Bowman You can t help but feel further empowered to follow your own dreams Since the start of her Knauss Fellowship early February Bowman has been working as a Communications Specialist at NOAA Fisheries Office of Science and Technology Her current responsibilities include writing science articles for the Office of Science and Technology s newsroom creating fisheries and climate change related fact sheets for public information creating infographics using visual design programs and assisting with internal communications projects I am getting an in depth focus on how communications works in science and policy and I am really loving this work said Bowman A self proclaimed fish nerd Bowman has been an ocean lover for as long as she can remember She fondly remembers spending long days playing at the beach and she recalls experiencing a pivotal moment during an eighth grade field trip to the Monterey Bay Aquarium I lost the group tour and spent a couple of hours completely engrossed in petting bat rays It was love at first pet After graduating from high school Bowman earned a business degree from Sierra Nevada College in Nevada just one mile from the shore of Lake Tahoe Then she spent a year traveling the world and began scuba diving a hobby that soon led to incredible job opportunities In the following years Bowman worked on a ship in Alaska for half a year and then as a divemaster and instructor while living in Thailand Egypt Nicaragua and the Bay Islands of Honduras She also spent six months working as the dive safety officer while on a research base in the Sian Ka an Biosphere Reserve in Mexico After working and traveling for many years she relocated to Maui Hawaii where her interest in ocean science was again piqued Fascinated by the local Hawaiian marine life Bowman wanted to learn more about the different species She read extensively attended science lectures and eventually signed up for an oceanography course at University of Hawaii Maui College UHMC With encouragement from oceanography instructor Donna Brown Bowman decided to continue to her educational journey at UHMC where she graduated Magna Cum Laude in applied natural science in 2013 Following graduation Bowman became interested in the MAS MBC program at Scripps for its interdisciplinary approach to educating students about ocean conservation I felt that I could learn so much from a diverse platform and knew that I would meet some top people in science economics

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/fellowships/fellows-blog/from-divemaster-to-dc (2015-06-03)
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  • State Fellow alumna: "I wouldn't have the job I have today without this fellowship" | California Sea Grant
    California waters and facilitating the California CyanoHAB Network a large work group that focuses on addressing harmful cyanobacteria blooms Trash is a huge environmental issue she says You can hardly go anywhere without finding trash on the beach on the road in the street in the ocean and on a hike It is collectively our fault Finding a solution requires awareness education and change of behavior Furthering the skills and research she developed as a Sea Grant fellow Johanna is working to be a part of that solution by guiding her main project through the public process in hopes of having it adopted by the State Water Resources Control Board The project focuses on providing more protections to a special type of marine managed area called State Water Quality Protection Areas and implementing trash amendments If adopted the amendments will be my greatest work accomplishment thus far said Johanna Born in Texas and spending her childhood in a variety of places throughout the US and Germany Johanna Weston has always been an avid hiker and nature enthusiast Her parents encouragement sparked an admiration of the great outdoors that she began to explore as a Biology major at the University of Dallas While most of her peers took interest in the subject of biology as a platform for pre medical studies Johanna found her passion in research She moved on to earn her Masters in Biological Science from California Polytechnic State University with the support of her academic advisor narrowing the focus of her work to quantifying nitrate sources and sinks in Morro Bay Estuary Johanna then realized her desire to explore the connection between scientists and policy work discovering that California Sea Grant s fellowship program offered an opportunity to do exactly that Despite initial challenges of working in a

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/fellowships/fellows-blog/state-fellow-alumna-i-wouldnt-have-the-job-i-have-today-without-this (2015-06-03)
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  • Profile: Annalisa Batanides at NOAA Fisheries Office of Aquaculture | California Sea Grant
    high up in the mountains surrounded by huge trees and diverse wildlife I think that all of this combined gave me a huge appreciation for the natural environment and a desire to preserve it for future generations 2 What sparked your interest in environmental law I studied Environmental Policy Analysis and Planning as an undergraduate at UC Davis This was a fantastic major because it exposed me to environmental science as well as environmental policy I realized that as a society we were coming up with many innovative solutions to our most dire environmental problems but these solutions were not being integrated into our laws and policies As such I chose to pursue a career in environmental policy During my last year as an undergrad one of my professors suggested I pursue a law degree because with a detailed knowledge of our laws and regulations I could make greater change I took her advice and attended UC Davis School of Law focusing on environmental and public interest law 3 Is there any particular area of environmental law you focused on in college or that you would like to focus on and why During Law School I exposed myself to all areas of environmental law but increasingly gravitated towards species and resource conservation climate change animal law and environmental justice issues I think I gravitated towards these disciplines because I see them as the greatest challenges facing my generation and the greatest opportunities for change 4 What are your hobbies and interests outside of work and school I regularly teach group exercise classes and currently teach U Jam and BodyPump I also love spending time in nature backpacking running hiking whatever I grew up a dancer and still dance whenever I get the chance I love painting reading fantasy novels and

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/fellowships/fellows-blog/profile-annalisa-batanides-at-noaa-fisheries-office-of-aquaculture (2015-06-03)
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  • Becoming Catadromous: Fresh Beginnings Amidst a Salty Past and Future | California Sea Grant
    fellowship and placed in the Delta Science Program to help the Delta Independent Science Board ISB with their upcoming report focusing on the state of the science regarding how riverine and estuarine flows are affecting fish species in the San Francisco Sacramento San Joaquin Bay Delta whew let s just call it the Bay Delta I had to adapt to a new type of environment working with freshwater and estuarine fishes So what do you do when there is so much to learn about freshwater systems Dive right in of course I did a lot of reading those first few months When I say a lot I mean A LOT I familiarized myself with a whole new cast of characters so many freshwater estuarine fish species in this region wrapped my head around the complex dynamic and greatly human influenced environment in which they lived and most difficult of all tried to understand the political climate revolving around water use and management in California What I found was extremely interesting it was an entirely different perspective When I was focused on studying marine fish species I found that the most important environmental factors that affected the species I was studying were temperature oceanographic conditions and prey availability In the Bay Delta system all those factors come into play plus so many more Since up to half of the water flowing into the Bay Delta is diverted either through pumping facilities other water diversions or for local in Delta use I have to think about how flows affect fish growth mortality and reproduction Flow is an extremely complex term and has many hydrodynamic components and in addition many factors such as temperature salinity and food resources for fish are affected by flow Thus understanding how flows affect fish populations is very

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/fellowships/fellows-blog/becoming-catadromous-fresh-beginnings-amidst-a-salty-past-and-future (2015-06-03)
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  • Coming Full-Circle with the West Coast Ocean Observing Systems | California Sea Grant
    involves working with data and agencies outside of Southern California While the West Coast OOS Regional Associations RAs are all housed under the national a href http www ioos noaa gov Integrated Ocean Observing System IOOS a network and share data across geographic boundaries each RA has its own focus within coastal oceanography and ocean health monitoring My fellowship has helped me explore these nuances giving me a better understanding of the variety of coastal environments and marine related issues around the U S This spring I had the opportunity to visit another of my host OOSs the a href http www cencoos org Central and Northern California Ocean Observing System CeNCOOS a nbsp along with several of their partner organizations CeNCOOS is based at the edge of the world renowned Monterey Bay and Monterey Submarine Canyon giving it the ideal position to work with a host of academic collaborators including the a href http www mbari org Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute MBARI a a href http ims ucsc edu UC Santa Cruz a the a href http www mlml calstate edu CSU Moss Landing Marine Lab a a href http www marine stanford edu index html Stanford University s Hopkins Marine Station a and the a href http www nrlmry navy mil Naval Research Laboratory a During my visit I attended a Marine Debris Symposium hosted by the a href http montereybay noaa gov Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary MBNMS a and presented a poster on my Fellowship work a connecting Ocean Observing System data to marine debris The Symposium gave me the opportunity to learn about marine debris cleanup and reduction efforts around California and connected me with people interested in using the data products I have created Seeing nbsp potential applications for these products motivated me to solve several tricky coding problems to improve my products In August I had a wonderful trip to Oregon and Washington to visit my third OOS host the a href http www nanoos org Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems NANOOS a and its stakeholders In recent years a href http www nanoos org education learning tools oa ocean acidification ph has collaborated closely with shellfish farmers a in the Pacific Northwest to help monitor understand and highlight the detrimental effects of increasing ocean acidification on shellfish growth and survival nbsp During my visit I toured several shellfish farms to hear nbsp how they benefit from collaborations with NANOOS One aspect of my fellowship has involved updating the West Coast Ocean Acidification Assets Inventory a list of West Coast nbsp OA monitoring equipment and stations which is being incorporated into the new a href http www ipacoa org IOOS Pacific Region OA Portal a Learning nbsp firsthand about the impacts of OA on larval growth and shell formation added value and context to the extensive lists of nbsp monitoring assets and data that nbsp I had been working with I also attended several a href http www westcoastoceans org

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/fellowships/fellows-blog/coming-full-circle-with-the-west-coast-ocean-observing-systems (2015-06-03)
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  • Learning the Language to Lead | California Sea Grant
    and this past summer I was able to participate in the selection process and ultimately became the day to day manager of Andrew Brinkman during his internship In Andrew s short 11 weeks at CINMS I quickly learned how much effort was needed to properly mentor an intern I took time to identify his strengths and weaknesses and made sure to set aside time to help him develop new valuable professional skills It was my responsibility to train Andrew on how to use all different kinds of equipment and manage the data from our shared projects Luckily for me Andrew was a hard worker with a great capacity to learn Despite his terrestrial ecology background Andrew quickly picked up the basics of marine research overcoming the unique difficulties of conducting research on the water In addition to Andrew s time in the field he gained skills relevant to his future scientific career most notably developing his professional writing ability Andrew and I worked in tandem to write the internal CINMS manual on the West Coast Observations project for the sanctuary Making sure that Andrew thoroughly understood the project was important but ensuring his writing clearly articulated the process became just as critical The creation of this manual didn t only help Andrew professionally I also learned how to communicate more effectively with people outside my field through the mentoring process My Master s degree heavily depended on the technologies used in many CINMS projects and I had fallen into the trap of using jargon that is not easily understood by the public Working with Andrew made me realize the limitations of my own scientific communication By collaborating with Andrew and discovering where my weak areas were I believe our final product was better then I could do on my own

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/fellowships/fellows-blog/learning-the-language-to-lead (2015-06-03)
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