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  • Second “sea serpent” carcass was female with cookiecutter shark bites | California Sea Grant
    Although parts of the animal s mouth and head were missing and damaged scientists were in the process of dissecting the brain trying to recover ear bone structures known as otoliths that can be used to estimate the animal s age and growth rates over time While not as exciting as some of the theories put forth by the press the female oarfish could have died from plain old age I don t have a good guess as to what might be the cause of death said Suzanne Kohin a NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center fish ecologist who recovered the carcass over the weekend We are considering everything Everything includes testing tissue for radiation algal toxins PCBs and mercury The press has been particularly curious about whether earthquakes might have killed the oarfish said Milton Love a biologist at UC Santa Barbara who said he spent the day talking to media After the Fukushima nuclear disaster there were accounts of several of the animals washing ashore Love speculates that ocean currents or internal waves could have pushed the oarfish the world s largest bony fish to shallower waters near the coast These fish live at depths of a thousand meters where there is not much current he said Though large they are fragile If caught in an internal wave or by a current they could be propelled out of their normal territory According to NOAA Fisheries oarfish probably only come to the surface when injured or dying The oarfish s stomach Credit C Johnson The question is what could bring them up to the surface California Sea Grant Director James Eckman said You can speculate We know that the eastern Pacific Ocean is notorious for having low oxygen waters at depth and that these low oxygen waters are starting to

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/news/second-sea-serpent-carcass-was-female-with-cookiecutter-shark-bites (2015-06-03)
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  • An early, short winter expected for most of California | California Sea Grant
    could also offer relief to the currently meager Sierra snowpack a major source of drinking and irrigation water for the state Coastal areas north of Point Conception can expect a soggy December he said By February drier than normal conditions are predicted to prevail marking a potentially early end to winter In Southern California and the Central Valley which have experienced two consecutive unusually dry winters weather models are predicting about 30 percent more rain this winter The Los Angeles area for example is forecasted to receive about 4 6 inches of winter time rain compared with a historical average of 9 25 inches Clark said We won t see normal conditions but a wetter winter is still good news for fire fighters Clark said More rain could help delay the onset of fire season and maintain reservoirs and lakes for boaters and recreational fishing William Patzert an oceanographer and climate scientist at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory said that The smart money is on a dry winter in California Ocean conditions are loading the dice for drier and cooler than normal conditions to prevail Patzert said Since 1998 the ocean has been in a cold phase of a long term cycle in ocean temperature variability known as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation he explained This mode of the ocean climate system associated with cooler than normal water temperatures in the northern Pacific Ocean stacks the deck in favor of drier cooler temperatures especially when it coincides with La Niña events The eastern tropical Pacific Ocean at present is in a neutral state that is neither El Niño nor La Niña conditions he said Written by Christina S Johnson About California Sea Grant NOAA s California Sea Grant College Program funds marine research education and outreach throughout California Our headquarters is

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/news/an-early-short-winter-expected-for-most-of-california (2015-06-03)
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  • California Sea Grant 2013 State Fellows Video Contest Winners Announced | California Sea Grant
    to protect and restore the region in which more than 95 percent of the wetlands have been lost to development This year s video submissions reflect our Fellows commitment and contribution to California marine resources and policy said Shauna Oh Associate Director of California Sea Grant I hope these will be a helpful resource and educational tool for both policy makers and community stakeholders along the coast Marisa Villarreal a state fellow from the California Ocean Protection Council was declared second place winner for her video regarding marine protected areas titled Our Coast Our Heritage Judges recognized Hayley Carter a state fellow from the Ocean Science Trust as the third place winner for her video titled Ocean Acidification on the U S West Coast Issues and Opportunities The fellows earned 750 and 500 respectively Carter won an additional 100 for her early bird entry California Sea Grant launched the State Fellows video contest this year Open to individuals and teams of 2013 State Fellows the contest was designed to inform the public about the work of CA Sea Grant fellows and provide an engaging behind the scenes look at state resource management The video submissions were evaluated for originality and accessibility to the general public and will join hundreds of resources available on the California Sea Grant website These resources provide updates on funded research and information to enhance the understanding conservation and sustainable use of coastal and marine resources About California Sea Grant NOAA s California Sea Grant College Program funds marine research education and outreach throughout California Our headquarters is at Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California San Diego we are one of 33 Sea Grant programs in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA U S Department of Commerce Share This email facebook linkedin twitter google

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/news/california-sea-grant-2013-state-fellows-video-contest-winners-announced (2015-06-03)
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  • Scripps grad student wins NOAA Fisheries-Sea Grant Fellowship in Population Dynamics | California Sea Grant
    2014 Kailin Kroetz UCD 603 219 6933 kkroetz ucdavis edu The Alaskan halibut and sablefish fishery is currently managed under a catch shares program known as an individual transferable quota ITQ Loosely speaking ITQs grant quota holders rights to catch a certain amount of fish and to buy and sell quota much as stocks are traded To meet certain social goals however ITQs are not purely free market based and are often established with restrictions on who can trade with whom and own quota With the halibut sablefish fishery for example smaller vessels must maintain a certain amount of the total quota and there are limits to corporate ownership and consolidation Though these rules keep more boats on the water they also decrease the fishery s economic efficiency The goal of this project is to develop a model that can quantify the costs of these inefficiencies for the halibut and other ITQ fisheries In the project s first year a preliminary model was developed and is now being fine tuned Results from this project are relevant to fishery managers and can be used to inform the design of new catch shares programs Propagation of Environmental Variability Across Trophic Levels How Biological and Ecological Factors Influence Sensitivity of Communities to Climate and Fishing Jun 2012 May 2014 Lewis Barnett UCD 530 665 0019 labarnett ucdavis edu Climate change may exacerbate year to year fluctuations in fish stock sizes and if this occurs managers will be faced with new challenges This project aims to identify management techniques that might undo some of these climate related effects and thus dampen swings in fish population sizes and protect the structure of natural food webs In work to date the fellow has been identifying data sources for a model that will be used to simulate the effects of climate change on fish stocks He and his colleagues are especially interested in understanding how climate driven variability in the size of one fish stock will affect stock sizes at higher and lower levels of the food chain The case study for the model s development will look at interactions between hake whiting forage fishes anchovies herring and sardines and krill Development of Novel Stock Assessment Methods for Market Squid Jun 2011 May 2014 Charles Perretti UCSD SIO 858 534 3892 cperretti ucsd edu The California market squid is the state s largest fishery by volume representing more than half of the total amount of fish landed in 2011 To put some numbers to this nearly 268 million pounds of the tasty cephalopod were harvested in 2011 compared with 139 million pounds for all other seafood species combined Despite the fishery s size and 68 million ex vessel value in 2011 there has never been a formal estimate of the stock s biomass and some biologists have expressed concerns that removing so much forage for other marine species could have ecosystem level impacts The broad goal of this project is to figure out how much squid is

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/news/scripps-grad-student-wins-noaa-fisheries-sea-grant-fellowship-in-population-dynamics (2015-06-03)
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  • News | California Sea Grant
    at the University of San Francisco Fellowships News Local Catch wins 100 000 grant July 08 2013 Alan Lovewell a former West Coast Sea Grant Fellow has taken the road less travelled and it has made all the difference News Research Beach crustaceans going locally extinct July 05 2013 Small beach invertebrates the small crustaceans that feed so many other animals are going locally extinct News Research A new oyster invades July 02 2013 The world s most widely consumed widely farmed bivalve the delectable Pacific oyster has taken up residence in San Diego s bays and lagoons News Outreach Extension Specialist studying krill die off July 01 2013 Millions of krillb have been washing up on beaches from Bodega Bay Calif to Newport Ore Fellowships Research Fellow quantifies wetland carbon budgets June 27 2013 Gavin McNicol a Berkeley doctoral student and Delta Science Fellow wants to quantify the carbon credit value of restoring wetlands in the Sacramento San Joaquin Bay Delta Pages first previous 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 next last Sign Up for News Seen in the Press Shoreline Newsletter Contact the Communications Staff Contact Us University of California San Diego California Sea Grant

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/news?page=11 (2015-06-03)
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  • Farming the sea, in America | California Sea Grant
    similar one led by the UC Santa Barbara s Sustainable Fisheries Group in which the impacts of offshore energy were analyzed The hoped for outcome of this project scientists say is to significantly reduce conflict over and impacts from fish farming and thereby increase its value and compatibility with other ocean uses Development of Sustainable Tuna Aquaculture in the United States Using Yellowfin Tuna as a Model Feb 2012 Jan 2015 Mark Drawbridge Hubbs SeaWorld Research Institute 619 226 3943 mdrawbr hswri org Dan Margulies Inter American Tropical Tuna Commission 858 546 7120 dmargulies iattc org Rearing fish during their larval stage is often the most difficult part of developing a new species for culture however for yellowfin tuna this common difficulty is further complicated by the absence of a domestic population of breeding fish Instead of setting up breeding tanks locally which is expensive and logistically complex researchers have been airfreighting tuna eggs and larvae from the Inter American Tropical Tuna Commission s facility at the Achotines Laboratory in Panama one of the few research facilities in the world designed specifically to study the early life history of tropical tunas to their aquaculture facility at Hubbs SeaWorld Research Institute in San Diego The survivorship of these animals though has been so low that it has been basically impossible to carry out the necessary research on their early life history requirements e g nutritional requirements The first main goal of this project is to identify what is causing low survivorship among airfreighted fish and to fix the sources of harm if feasible Preliminary experiments during the project s first year suggest that packing larvae for air freight may itself be a problem as low survivorship was observed in both larvae airfreighted to San Diego and in controls kept on the ground in Panama In correspondence with scientists in August of 2013 Sea Grant was informed that all aspects of the project were delayed for the last 14 months because the captive tuna stopped spawning According to the research team in Panama this was due largely to a smaller than normal number of breeding adults and an inability to replenish the brood stock with new fish because of unusually poor fishing conditions The scientists report that fishing has improved recently and the population now stands at 24 with a target of 40 adults They plan to resume their research in 2014 Understanding Roles of Competing Bacterial Endosymbionts in Abalone Health Management and Restoration Feb 2010 Jan 2014 Carolyn Friedman UW 206 543 9519 carolynf u washington edu Peter Raimondi UCSC 831 459 5674 raimondi biology ucsc edu Glenn VanBlaricom UW 206 543 6475 raimondi biology ucsc edu Withering syndrome is a lethal abalone wasting disease that has decimated both farmed and remnant wild abalone populations Triggered by El Nino events or warmer than normal coastal waters the highly contagious water borne disease is now a global problem that continues to spread most recently to water off Japan This project seeks to

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/news/farming-the-sea-in-america (2015-06-03)
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  • Fishermen now the “right hand” of marine research | California Sea Grant
    2012 Sep 2014 Chugey Sepulveda Pfleger Institute of Enviromental Research 760 721 1404 chugey pier org Heidi Dewar NOAA NMFS 858 546 7023 Heidi Dewar noaa gov In this collaborative fisheries research project scientists are tagging and tracking swordfish to learn more about the billfish s movement patterns in relation to sea turtle habitat The team is also collaborating with the fishing industry to test two innovative gear modifications for reducing bycatch in the commercial swordfish fishery off California The key idea behind the gear modifications is to set hooks at depths that will efficiently target catch swordfish but not sea turtles and marine mammals closer to the sea s surface One experimental gear modifies a deep set buoy configuration currently used by small boat swordfish fishermen off Florida The other is a deep set long line for larger fishing vessels Both were pilot tested successfully by the lead investigators in 2011 In 2012 2013 PIER scientists tagged 10 swordfish within the Pacific Leatherback Closure Area established to protect the critical habitat of migrating leatherback sea turtles The tracking data is being used to characterize swordfish habitat and tailor the trial deep set operations The NOAA Fisheries team meanwhile has been conducting field trials of the deep set longlines and in 2012 made 17 deployments in waters off Central and Southern California with hooks set at an average depth of 235 meters With this configuration researchers caught a range of marketable species including one swordfish 37 opah and two albacore tuna Bycatch was dominated by blue sharks There were no sea turtle or marine mammal interactions The coming year s field work will focus on figuring out why so few swordfish were caught and whether different strategies might increase swordfish catches while still minimizing sea turtle interactions Mini Grants Collaborative Fisheries Research to Build Socioeconomic Essential Fishery Information A Test Case R OPCCFRW 7MG Apr 2013 Mar 2014 Caroline Pomoroy SGEP 831 459 4173 cpomeroy ucsd edu Monica Galligan CSUMB 831 582 4743 mgalligan csumb edu Paul Reilly CDFW 831 649 2879 preilly dfg ca gov Carolyn Culver SGEP 805 893 4530 cculver ucsd edu A California Sea Grant Coastal Specialist is leading a one year socioeconomic study of the commercial California halibut fishery in partnership with the commercial fishing community and state fisheries managers The project s focus is on the human system the players places and processes that interact with the ecological system The team has begun to review trends in commercial catches of the species by port where the fish are landed and by the gear used to catch the fish Once the existing data has been assembled scientists will work with fishermen to interpret the trends and explain why they are occurring The goal is to develop a collaborative process and template for documenting evaluating and predicting change in the fishery s human system which can be adapted for use in other fisheries The work will be iterative and will include vetting and refining the initial results with a larger group of commercial California halibut fishery participants before the final results are made public A final summary report will be posted on the California Sea Grant and California Department of Fish and Wildlife websites Testing the feasibility of urban coastal direct seafood markets R OPCCFRW 8MG 7 1 13 6 30 14 Theresa Sinicrope Talley California Sea Grant Extension Program 858 200 6975 tstalley ucsd edu Adina Batnitzky University of San Diego abatnitzky gmail com The goal of this project is to facilitate a diverse and local sustainable fishing industry by raising public awareness of the benefits and value of supporting locally caught and grown fish and shellfish The scientists will meet this goal using an inductive approach by leveraging San Diego s ethnic diversity and desire for healthier diets and the Port of San Diego s collaborative plan for two direct seafood markets The project has four main objectives to 1 determine public demand for local product and the ability of fishers and growers to supply consumers with products they will purchase 2 identify and address limitations to the public consuming more seafood 3 raise public awareness of the local fishing industry and diversity of its products and 4 identify species of emerging public interest to facilitate the development of management strategies before demand increases On September 2 2013 the scientists and their many collaborators hosted a seafood tasting survey and outreach event at San Diego Bay At the highly successful event about 200 participants voted on their likelihood of buying species they had just sampled in expertly prepared dishes and they took a 30 minute survey on their knowledge and interest in local seafood There was also public information on seafood nutrition and separate morning and afternoon events to better reach key audiences namely East African American women and urban seafood consumers likely to support the locavore movement Analyses of the survey results are ongoing In the coming months scientists will hold workshops aimed at San Diego s fishermen and aquaculturists and San Diego consumer groups and will follow up with each of the groups surveyed Cooperative tagging and tracking of yellowtail to assess recruitment and residency in the Southern California Bight R OPCCFRW 9MG 7 1 13 12 31 13 Stuart Sandin SIO UCSD 858 534 4150 ssandin ucsd edu Noah Ben Adereta SIO UCSD 858 248 0884 nbenader ucsd edu Graduate student Noah Ben Aderet holds a yellowfin that he caught off La Jolla in July of 2012 Credit SIO UCSD Yellowtail are a highly sought after trophy fish whose basic life history characteristics are poorly understood To enable sustainable long term management of the popular sport fishery this project seeks to gather quantitative movement pattern data on this economically important species with an emphasis on its movements around several of the region s new marine protected areas The tagging and tracking data that will be gathered in this project collaboratively with anglers will focus on two main questions 1 whether there

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/news/fishermen-now-the-right-hand-of-marine-research (2015-06-03)
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  • Floating robots “go with the flow” to monitor water quality | California Sea Grant
    We would like to know more about algae and the processes that transport algae said Qingfang Wu an environmental engineer and post doctoral researcher at UC Berkeley who was recently awarded a 2013 Delta Science Fellowship The drifters help us because they can go anywhere we need them to go The drifters officially called the Floating Sensor Network are each equipped with sensors that measure time position GPS water turbidity cloudiness chlorophyll salinity and water temperature Measurements are taken about every 5 seconds Inside each waterproof canister is ballast a battery and the brains of a smart phone hence the nickname smart drifters The researchers plan to launch the drifters one or two times each season for three days to a week depending on the weather conditions Qingfang s research will help elucidate how tidal shallow water habitats support pelagic foodwebs in the delta with a particular emphasis on developing quantitative models of these effects explained Brian Bergamaschi a research chemist with the USGS California Water Science Center in Sacramento and one of Wu s mentors on the project Understanding how tidal flows affect mixing and dispersion of water properties and phytoplankton is also a major focus of the project This is important because future plans call for large scale tidal wetland restoration he said Understanding and being able to model the effects of tidal restorations will allow these restorations to be most beneficially implemented particularly within the context of future river discharges and sea level rise Contact Qingfang Wu University of California Berkeley qingfangwu berkeley edu 510 387 0078 Written by Christina S Johnson About California Sea Grant NOAA s California Sea Grant College Program funds marine research education and outreach throughout California Our headquarters is at Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California San Diego we are one

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/news/floating-robots-go-with-the-flow-to-monitor-water-quality (2015-06-03)
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