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  • New fishing techniques may help sea turtles and swordfish fishers | California Sea Grant
    still minimizing fishing s environmental impacts Chugey Sepulveda director of the Pfleger Institute of Environmental Research PIER in Oceanside and colleagues have tagged and tracked 10 swordfish in the Pacific Leatherback Closure Area PLCA established to protect the critical habitat of migrating leatherback sea turtles The PLCA is now closed to California s primary swordfish fishery and the area currently only allows harpoon operations Sepulveda said by email The data that is collected will be used to identify potential depths that facilitate better targeting of swordfish and also document the degree of vertical separation between target and non target species of concern Preliminary findings suggest that swordfish above Point Conception do not display the same depth distribution as swordfish tagged in the Southern California Bight he said It is apparent that the daytime depths are shallower but still below the thermocline and more erratic We need additional data to ensure that these trends are indicative of the region Swordfish landings in California have declined from more than 4 million pounds in 2000 to about 612 000 pounds in 2012 largely because of regulations on when and where drift gillnetting can occur in federal waters Gillnetting is banned in state waters We are optimistic that deep set operations will provide additional fishery options that have minimal interactions with sea turtles and other sensitive species Sepulveda said However additional gear testing is needed This project is being supported by CFR West with funding from the Ocean Protection Council and administrative support from California Sea Grant Below is a summary of the project published in California Sea Grant s 2013 Program Directory with contact information for the lead scientists Targeting Swordfish Deep During the Day to Reduce Bycatch R OPCCFRW 4 Oct 2012 Sep 2014 Chugey Sepulveda Pfleger Institute of Enviromental Research 760

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/news/new-fishing-techniques-may-help-sea-turtles-and-swordfish-fishers (2015-06-03)
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  • Fishermen gather data on lobster fishery | California Sea Grant
    at UC Santa Barbara developed The idea behind a collaborative at sea sampling program is to engage fishermen in the process of data collection as well as interpretation thereby providing a more cost effective means for obtaining information needed for management Culver said by email Below is a summary of her project work to date with contact information for those who are interested in learning more Integrating Collaborative Data Collection with Management A Lobster Fishery Test Case R OPCCFRW 2 Jul 2012 Jun 2014 Carolynn Culver CASGEP 805 893 4530 cculver ucsd edu Stephen Schroeter UCSB 760 438 5953 schroter lifesci ucsb edu Caroline Pomeroy CASGEP 831 459 4173 cpomeroy ucsd edu Doug Neilson CDFW 858 467 4229 Douglas Neilson wildlife ca gov Could commercial lobster trap fishermen help gather and interpret data for long term cost effective fisheries management This project addresses this question building on an at sea sampling program for the southern rock crab fishery that was developed by the project s lead scientists During the CFR West project s first year fishermen scientists and managers worked together to develop and test protocols for collecting different types of data They are also determining how to integrate those protocols with different kinds of commercial lobster fishing operations In August 2013 the scientists reported that they were in the process of analyzing data collected during the previous fishing season 2012 13 to identify the types of data most needed for management i e data that varies among fishing locations and an associated sampling regime for the upcoming 2013 2014 lobster season that ensures scientific rigor while minimizing impacts on the program s fishing partners In addition fishermen scientists and managers involved in the project have been discussing ideas for storing and sharing data and for continuing the program into

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/news/fishermen-gather-data-on-lobster-fishery (2015-06-03)
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  • $1.2 million awarded to 10 new Delta Science Fellows | California Sea Grant
    Sharma a postdoc at Caltech explained that dune fields on Titan have many unexpected similarities to the sand dunes in the sub Saharan desert in terms of their shape and the processes that formed them For her Delta Science Project she will apply techniques she developed to analyze Titan s surface roughness to monitor very small deformations and movements at and around levees in the delta I am still analyzing the same kinds of NASA radar data Sharma explained It s just that this radar data will be of Earth not Titan The goal is to understand what causes levee instability and seepage Recipient Kenneth Jeffries a post doc at UC Davis will be studying the potential impacts of climate change on native and non native fishes and hopes to develop biomarkers of thermal stress Such could help scientists and managers evaluate habitat quality for fishes My research will characterize the effects of water temperature on the expression of 44 000 genes in longfin smelt and inland silverside Jeffries explained This type of research would not even have been possible a decade ago before advances in genomics Yet another new fellow Qingfang Wu a post doc at Berkeley will deploy a newly developed fleet of smart drifters into the Liberty Island wetland These portable floating robots track and monitor water quality using smart phone technologies The use of cell phone technologies for environmental monitoring is enabling us to reveal features of river flows that have been previously un observable said UC Berkeley professor Alexandre Bayen Wu s academic mentor on the project It s super exciting This year s post doctoral research fellowship recipients are Erin Bray UC Santa Barbara who will study gravel bars in rivers to identify what features facilitate groundwater exchanges that create good Chinook salmon spawning habitat Cedric Fichot California Institute of Technology who will use hyperspectral remote sensing reflectance data to map and study the dynamics of methylmercury in the Bay Delta Priyanka Sharma California Institute of Technology who will use synthetic aperture radar data to monitor levee conditions and subsidence in the Delta Kenneth Jeffries UC Davis who will determine thermal tolerances of longfin smelt and inland silverside and develop biomarkers of thermal stress using new genomics technology Elizabeth Wells UC Davis who will investigate effects of climate change on survival growth and feeding rate of the invasive overbite and invasive Asian clams Anna Sturrock UC Berkeley who will examine links between the early life histories of Central Valley Chinook salmon and their chances of surviving to adulthood Qingfang Wu UC Berkeley who will deploy a fleet of floating robots into the Liberty Island wetland to study how water currents and wetland geomorphology affect phytoplankton abundances and transport The graduate student fellowship recipients are Ali Shafiee UCLA who will study the seismic response of peaty organic soils beneath delta levees to improve seismic hazard assessments Katherine Smith UC Davis who will study the basic ecology of the endangered salt marsh harvest mouse to better

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/news/12-million-awarded-to-10-new-delta-science-fellows (2015-06-03)
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  • News | California Sea Grant
    to diet June 18 2013 Can science link the die off to diet and the small forage fishes off the coast Dan Robinette an ornithologist says yes Research Help scientists tag bass June 17 2013 The Brice Semmens laboratory at UCSD will be conducting two bass tagging trips aboard the Sea Watch on June 17 and June 20 in the normally no fishing areas of the La Jolla Cove Outreach Plant this not that June 14 2013 When people say invasive they are usually talking about two different ideas introduced and invasive Outreach California s saltiest coastal creek June 13 2013 Malibu Creek is arguably California s saltiest coastal creek and according to one water manager its unusual saltiness is due to leaching of minerals from a vast shale rock layer Outreach Watch rip current in wave tank June 07 2013 All during Rip Current Awareness Week we ve been looking at rip currents in the real ocean where real people are at risk of drowning if they get caught in a rip and panic Pages first previous 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 next last Sign Up for News Seen in the Press Shoreline Newsletter Contact

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/news?page=12 (2015-06-03)
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  • CALFED Science Fellows Class of 2005 | California Sea Grant
    these might change Once the model has been refined scientists will input climate and land use projections for 2030 to forecast changes in dissolved nutrient transport through Central Valley watersheds Walter Heady Walter Heady holds a bachelor s degree in biology from UC Santa Cruz 1996 and is currently a first year doctoral student in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department at UC Santa Cruz Prior to entering graduate school he was as a biological consultant for habitat conservation plans and environmental impact reports for sensitive species Much of this work related to monitoring juvenile steelhead in Northern California watersheds He has also been a watershed analyst for the San Lorenzo Valley Water District and currently participates in several monitoring programs in Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary including a marine mammal project with the Center for Integrated Marine Technologies His current research interests are in understanding the effects of stream flow water temperature and food availability on juvenile steelhead growth survival and movement in the Mokelumne and Consumes rivers Progress Report Year 1 HeadyYr1 pdf Final Report HeadyYr2 pdf Winning CALFED Fellow Studies Steelhead Survival 12 05 08 Project Abstract Effects of Water Temperature Stream Flow and Flood Availability on the Growth Survival and Movement of Central Valley Juvenile Steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss with Implications for Water Management Project Number R SF 11 Project Dates Sept 05 Aug 08 Walter Heady UCSC 831 459 5783 heady biology ucsc edu The CALFED Fellow has discovered that two constructed side channels on the lower Mokelumne River provide rearing habitat for juvenile chinook salmon and steelhead and enhance macro invertebrate abundance and diversity The fellow is now working in collaboration with the East Bay Municipal Utilities District and Cramer Fish Sciences on an acoustic telemetry project in the area As of June 2008 126 wild steelhead have been tracked along standardized transects using a handheld hydrophone From the acoustic data the fellow is looking at steelhead habitat associations movement rates and their survival in different habitats Some of the topics under investigation Is in stream wood important to fish and when in their life history Are there mortality hotspots on smolt migration routes Where and how could this be rectified In the coming year the fellow will write up his research and make recommendations on how to integrate his findings into management decisions Agencies that will receive the report include CALFED California Department of Fish and Game East Bay Municipal Utility District California Urban Water Association and U S Fish and Wildlife Service James Hobbs James Hobbs holds a bachelor s degree in marine biology 1997 and a doctorate in ecology from UC Davis 2004 He is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the Bodega Marine Laboratory and John Muir Institute for the Environment at UC Davis but during his CALFED Fellowship will be at working in the geography department at UC Berkeley Concerned by the decline in fish populations worldwide his research looks at among other things the links between degradation of fish nursery habitats and declines or changes in recruitment To do this he studies the chemical signatures in ear stones in fish the patterns of larval dispersal and migratory histories of species He currently has a project in the San Francisco Bay Delta studying the effects of climate change and human activities such as water diversions and habitat destruction on the delta smelt longfin smelt and Sacramento splittail Another project in Bodega and Tomales bays focuses on the role of sea grass habitats and ocean circulation on the recruitment of rockfish Progress Report Year 1 HobbsYr1 pdf Progress Report Year 2 HobbsYr2 pdf Final Report HobbsYr3 pdf Final Project Summary Otolith Growth and Microchemistry to Determine Variability in Recruitment Success of Delta Smelt Hobbs J R SF 9 09 01 2005 08 31 2008 R SF 9 Hobbs pdf Project Abstract The Application of Otolith Geochemistry to Determine Stock Structure Survival and the Relative Impact of Water Exports on the Threatened Delta Smelt Project Number R SF 9 Project Dates Sept 05 Aug 08 James Hobbs UCD 707 875 1973 jahobbs ucdavis edu The delta smelt is a small fish found in only one ecosystem in the world the brackish waters of the San Francisco Estuary Unfortunately for its survival about two thirds of the state s fresh water is pumped from this same habitat As a result untold numbers of smelt larvae are sent through the extensive pumping systems of state and federal water projects By studying the otolith geochemistry of adult smelt collected during a monitoring survey the CALFED Fellow has shown that a majority of recruiting delta smelt reside in the North and Central West Delta rather than the South Delta where freshwater exports occur Another important finding has been that the low salinity habitats in Suisun Bay provide critical nursery areas for juvenile smelt during wet years During these years smelt are confined to the delta s confluence where they are susceptible to export It also appears that several contingents life history patterns exist in the population those that are spawned in freshwater and then early in life move to low salinity waters those that move late to low salinity waters and those that reside permanently in freshwater These contingents likely have evolved to adapt to varying estuarine conditions and have different growth and survival rates The project s findings have had a direct impact on the region s freshwater pumping schedules and have also invigorated interest in restoring the Cache slough area in the North Delta Suzanne Langridge Suzanne Langridge holds bachelor s degree from Smith College and is currently a doctoral student in environmental studies at UC Santa Cruz Her thesis examines fundamental ecological interactions between restored riparian habitats in the Sacramento River and neighboring farms In particular she is interested in understanding how the movement of organisms between farmed and restored areas including agricultural pests and enemies of these pests affects the success of habitat restoration projects In the future she plans to use her

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/news/calfed-science-fellows-class-of-2005 (2015-06-03)
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  • CALFED Science Fellows Class of 2003-2004 | California Sea Grant
    and stable carbon isotopes in tidal marsh sediments of San Francisco Bay From these records she was able to infer past climate variability in the region After earning her doctorate she received funding from CALFED and the U S Geological Survey to co author a review paper on what is known about California s paleoclimate This paper provides CALFED with an overview on the potential impacts of climate change on the Bay Delta Her current research builds on this work As a CALFED Science Fellow Malmud Roam studies the sources of mineral sediments in tidal marsh habitats of San Francisco estuary Identifying these sources is important in understanding whether or the degree to which continued sea level rise and climate variability might impede efforts to restore and rebuild tidal marshlands in the area Malmud Roam s CALFED Science Fellowship ends in 2006 Afterwards she hopes to land a faculty position in geography in Northern California Progress Report Year 1 CALFEDPostAwdMalmudRoam pdf Final Report CALFEDInterRptRoam04 pdf Project Profile Sediment Supply and Marsh Development in the San Francisco Estuary R SF 3 9 1 2003 8 31 2006 CF Malamud Roam pdf Project Abstract Sediment Supply and Marsh Development in San Francisco Estuary Projcet Number R SF 3 Project Dates Sept 03 Aug 06 Frances Malamud Roam UCB 510 643 1631 fmalamud eps berkeley edu In this project researchers have developed a set of geochemical fingerprints using trace elements and strontium isotope signatures that allow them to identify sources of sediments in tidal marshes of the northern San Francisco Estuary Dams and water diversions have reduced sediment loads making downstream habitats vulnerable to inundation caused by rising sea level The goal of this project is to quantify the proportion of sediments coming from local creeks and streams versus those from the larger watershed associated with Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers To date researchers have analyzed four sediment cores collected from a relatively small marsh along Novato Creek in Marin The data suggest that 1 inland sites receive more of their sediments from the local creek than the bayward sites and 2 the sediments on the surface of the marsh are more closely correlated with sediments from Napa River than with sediments passing through the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta In the next year researchers will among other things complete a mixing model to quantify the fraction of sediments derived from various end member sources for a series of sediment cores taken from different marshes The findings will provide a quantitative evaluation of the feasibility of marsh restoration projects in the region as well as an assessment of how the estuary tidal marshes may fare under rapidly rising global sea level JEFF OPPERMAN Jeff Opperman a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Integrated Watershed Science and Management at UC Davis studies the interactions between rivers and floodplains in driving ecological productivity habitat quality and species diversity As a CALFED Science Fellow he is currently reviewing what is known about the hydrology morphology and ecology

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/news/calfed-science-fellows-class-of-2003-2004 (2015-06-03)
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  • News | California Sea Grant
    Marine Protected Areas Baseline Data Collection Summary December 01 2008 This report summarizes the 2007 2008 Central Coast Marine Protected Areas Baseline Data Collection Projects which were a collaborative effort between California s State Coastal Conservancy Ocean Fellowships News 2009 State Fellows Awarded September 23 2008 California Sea Grant is pleased to announce the 2009 State Fellowship winners Research Delta Science Fellows Class of 2008 09 January 01 2008 Through the Delta Science Fellows Program formerly known as the CALFED Science Fellows Program doctoral and postdoctoral researchers partner with senior academic and community mentors on projects Research CALFED Science Fellows Class of 2007 January 01 2007 Through the CALFED Science Fellows Program early career scientists CALFED agency scientists and senior academic research mentors collaborate on research of direct relevance to CALFED s broad goal Research CALFED Science Fellows Class of 2006 January 01 2006 The Science Fellows program is a project that brings together young scientists CALFED agency scientists and senior research mentors in collaborative data analysis and research projects relevent to Pages first previous 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 next last Sign Up for News Seen in the Press Shoreline Newsletter Contact the Communications Staff

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/news?page=18 (2015-06-03)
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  • News | California Sea Grant
    drowning each year Extension News CA Sea Grant Seafood Specialist to retire May 19 2013 California Sea Grant Seafood Specialist Pamela Tom will retire after nearly 40 years of service with the University of California Fellowships Former CASG State Fellow Sara Hutto accepts job at NOAA Marine Sanctuaries May 16 2013 Sara Hutto a 2012 California Sea Grant State Fellow is the new sanctuary advisory council coordinator for the Monterey

    Original URL path: https://caseagrant.ucsd.edu/news?page=13 (2015-06-03)
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