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  • NanoEngineering (NANO) Courses
    and statistical mechanics interatomic forces and intermolecular interactions nanomechanics of self assembly pattern formation hierarchical ordering defects surfaces and interfaces plasticity creep fracture and fatigue adhesion friction and wear nanorheology nanotribology composite materials carbon nanomaterials biological materials Prerequisites NANO 104 NANO 156 Nanomaterials 4 Basic principles of synthesis techniques processing microstructural control and unique physical properties of materials in nanodimensions Nanowires quantum dots thin films electrical transport optical behavior mechanical behavior and technical applications of nanomaterials Cross listed with MAE 166 Prerequisites upper division standing NANO 158 Phase Transformations and Kinetics 4 Materials and microstructures changes Understanding of diffusion to enable changes in the chemical distribution and microstructure of materials rates of diffusion Phase transformations effects of temperature and driving force on transformations and microstructure Prerequisites NANO 108 and NANO 148 NANO 158L Materials Processing Laboratory 4 Metal casting processes solidification deformation processing thermal processing solutionizing aging and tempering joining processes such as welding and brazing The effect of processing route on microstructure and its effect on mechanical and physical properties will be explored NanoEngineering majors have priority enrollment Prerequisites NANO 158 NANO 161 Material Selection in Engineering 4 Selection of materials for engineering systems based on constitutive analyses of functional requirements and material properties The role and implications of processing on material selection Optimizing material selection in a quantitative methodology NanoEngineering majors receive priority enrollment Prerequisites NANO 108 Department approval required NANO 164 Advanced Micro and Nano materials for Energy Storage and Conversion 4 Materials for energy storage and conversion in existing and future power systems including fuel cells and batteries photovoltaic cells thermoelectric cells and hybrids Prerequisites NANO 101 and NANO 102 NANO 168 Electrical Dielectric and Magnetic Properties of Engineering Materials 4 Introduction to physical principles of electrical dielectric and magnetic properties Semiconductors control of defects thin film and nanocrystal growth electronic and optoelectronic devices Processing microstructure property relations of dielectric materials including piezoelectric pyroelectric and ferroelectric and magnetic materials Prerequisites NANO 102 and NANO 104 NANO 174 Mechanical Behavior of Materials 4 Microscopic and macroscopic aspects of the mechanical behavior of engineering materials with emphasis on recent development in materials characterization by mechanical methods The fundamental aspects of plasticity in engineering materials strengthening mechanisms and mechanical failure modes of materials systems Prerequisites NANO 108 NANO 174L Mechanical Behavior Laboratory 4 Experimental investigation of mechanical behavior of engineering materials Laboratory exercises emphasize the fundamental relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties and the evolution of the microstructure as a consequence of rate process Prerequisites NANO 174 NANO 199 Independent Study for Undergraduates 4 Independent reading or research on a problem by special arrangement with a faculty member P NP grades only Prerequisites upper division and department stamp NanoEngineering Graduate Courses NANO 200 Graduate Seminar in Chemical Engineering 1 Each graduate student in NANO is expected to attend three seminars per quarter of his or her choice dealing with current topics in chemical engineering Topics will vary Cross listed with CENG 205 S U grades only May be taken for credit four times NANO 201 Introduction to Nanoengineering 4 Understanding nanotechnology broad implications miniaturization scaling laws nanoscale physics types and properties of nanomaterials nanomechanical oscillators nano bio electronics nanoscale heat transfer fluids at the nanoscale machinery cell applications of nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology NANO 202 Intermolecular and Surface Forces 4 Development of quantitative understanding of the different intermolecular forces between atoms and molecules and how these forces give rise to interesting phenomena at the nanoscale such as flocculation wetting self assembly in biological natural and synthetic systems Cross listed with CENG 212 NANO 203 Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization 4 Nanoscale synthesistop down and bottom up chemical vapor deposition plasma processes soft lithography self assembly layer by layer Characterization microscopy scanning probe microscopes profilometry reflectometry and ellipsometry X ray diffraction spectroscopies EDX SIMS Mass spec Raman XPS particle size analysis electrical optical Cross listed with CENG 213 NANO 204 Nanoscale Physics and Modeling 4 This course will introduce students to analytical and numerical methods such as statistical mechanisms molecular simulations and finite differences and finite element modeling through their application to nanoengineering problems involving polymer and colloiod self assembly absorption phase separation and diffusion Cross listed with CENG 214 Prerequisites NANO 202 NANO 205 Nanosystems Integration 4 Scaling issues and hierarchical assembly of nanoscale components into higher order structures which retain desired properties at microscale and macroscale levels Novel ways to combine top down and bottom up processes for integration of heterogeneous components into higher order structures NANO 208 Nanofabrication 4 Basic engineering principles of nanofabrication Topics include photo electronbeam and nanoimprint lithography block copolymers and self assembled monolayers colloidal assembly biological nanofabrication Cross listed with CENG 208 NANO 210 Molecular Modeling and Simulations of Nanoscale Systems 4 Molecular and modeling and simulation techniques like molecular dynamics Monte Carlo and Brownian dynamics to model nanoscale systems and phenomena like molecular motors self assembly protein ligand binding RNA folding Valuable hands on experience with different simulators NANO 212 Computational Modeling of Nanosystems 4 Various modeling techniques like finite elements finite differences and simulation techniques like molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo to model fluid flow mechanical properties self assembly at the nanoscale and protein RNA and DNA folding NANO 227 Structure and Analysis of Solids 4 Key concepts in the atomic structure and bonding of solids such as metals ceramics and semiconductors Symmetry operations point groups lattice types space groups simple and complex inorganic compounds structure property comparisons structure determination with X ray diffraction Ionic covalent metallic bonding compared with physical properties Atomic and molecular orbitals bands verses bonds free electron theory Cross listed with MATS 227 MAE 251 and Chem 222 NANO 230 Synchrotron Characterization of Nanomaterials 4 Advanced topics in characterizing nanomaterials using synchrotron X ray sources Introduction to synchrotron sources X ray interaction with matter spectroscopic determination of electronic properties of nanomagnetic structural determination using scattering techniques and X ray imaging techniques Cross listed with CENG 230 NANO 234 Advanced Nanoscale Fabrication 4 Engineering principles of nanofabrication Topics include photo electron beam and nanoimprint lithography block copolymers and self assembled monolayers colloidal assembly biological nanofabrication Relevance to applications in energy electronics and medicine will be discussed NANO 238 Scanning Probe Microscopy 4 Scanning Electron Microscopy SEM detectors imaging image interpretation and artifacts introduction to lenses electron beam specimen interactions Operating principles and capabilities for atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy Scanning optical microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy NANO 239 Nanomanufacturing 4 Fundamental nanomanufacturing science and engineering top down nanomanufacturing processes bottom up nanomanufacturing processes integrated top down and bottom up nanofabrication processes three dimensional nanomanufacturing nanomanufacturing systems nanometrology nanomanufactured devices for medicine life sciences energy and defense applications NANO 241 Organic Nanomaterials 4 This course will provide an introduction to the physics and chemistry of soft matter followed by a literature based critical examination of several ubiquitous classes of organic nano materials and their technological applications Topics include self assembled monolayers block copolymers liquid crystals photoresists organic electronic materials micelles and vesicles soft lithography organic colloids organic nano composites and applications in biomedicine and food science Cross listed with Chem 241 NANO 242 Biochemisty and Molecular Biology 4 Course is designed to give nanoengineering students from a variety of backgrounds a working knowledge of biochemistry and molecular biology While the course offers biochemistry basics and key themes in molecular biology it will emphasize the role of engineering innovations NANO 243 Nanomedicine 4 Introduction to nanomedicine diffusion and drug dispersion diffusion in biological systems drug permeation through biological barriers drug transport by fluid motion pharmacokinetics of drug distribution drug delivery systems nanomedicine in practice cancers cardiovascular diseases immune diseases and skin diseases Cross listed with CENG 207 NANO 244 Nanomachines and Nanorobots 4 The structure and operational principles of different nature biomotors will be discussed Related bio inspired efforts aimed at developing artificial nanomotors will also be covered along with the prospects of using biomotors and synthetic nanomotors in engineering environments NANO 245 Nanoelectronics 4 An introduction to the nano electronics and nanospintronics fundamentals of semiconductors electronic band structure theory electron transport in semiconductors and nano structures nano devices Prerequisites NANO 201 NANO 247A Advanced BioPhotonics 4 Basic physics and chemistry of interaction of photons with matter photonic radiation pressure advanced optoelectronic detection systems devices methods time resolved fluorescent chemiluminescent methods fluorescent energy transfer techniques quantum dots near field optical techniques mechanisms of light sensitive biological systems including chloroplasts for photosynthetic energy conversion and basis of vision processes Cross listed with BENG 247A and ECE 247A NANO 247B BioElectronics 4 Topics include photolithographic techniques for high density DNA microarray production incorporation of CMOS control into electronic DNA microarrays direct electronic detection technology bio fuel cells highly integrated devices lab on a chip in vivo biosensors etc Form heterogeneous materials and components Cross listed with BENG 247B and ECE 247B NANO 247C BioNanotechnology 4 Nanosensors nanodevices for clinical diagnostics biowarfare agent detection nanostructures for drug delivery nanoarrays nanodevices nanoanalytical devices and systems methods for modification or functionalization of nanoparticles nanostructures with biological molecules nanostructural aspects of fuel cells biofuel cells potential use of DNA other biomolecules Cross listed with BENG 247C and ECE 247C NANO 250 Mechanics of Nanomaterials 4 Elements of continuum mechanics quantum and statistical mechanics interatomic forces and intermolecular interactions thermodynamics and diffusion materials nanomechanics of self assembly pattern formation and hierarchical ordering defects thin films surfaces and interfaces plasticity creep fracture and fatigue nanomechanics nanorheology and nanotribology NANO 251A Magnetic Materials Principles and Applications 4 The basis of magnetism classical and quantum mechanical points of view Different kinds of magnetic materials Magnetic phenomena including anisotropy magnetostriction domains and magnetization dynamics Current frontiers of nanomagnetics research including thin films and particles Optical data storage and biomedical engineering applications of soft and hard magnetic materials Cross listed with MAE 265B and MATS 251B NANO 252 Biomaterials and Biomimetics 4 Fundamental ways engineers adopt and adapt ideas from nature and make new engineering materials Protein based structural materials biomineralisation biosilification calcium carbonates calcium phosphates composite mechanics applied to natural materials biomimetic pattern formation biomimetic adhesion attachment devices mechanisms in nature biomimetic adhesives biomimetic flight Cross listed with CENG 256 NANO 253 Nanomaterials and Properties 4 This course discusses synthesis techniques processes microstructural control and unique physical properties of materials in nanodimensions Topics include nanowires quantum dots thin films electrical transport electron emission properties optical behavior mechanical behavior and technical applications of nanomaterials Cross listed with MAE 267 NANO 255 Electrochemistry 4 Application of electrochemical techniques to chemistry research Basic electrochemical theory and instrumentation the diffusion equations controlled potential and current methods Electrochemical kinetics Butler Volmer Marcus Hush theories preparative electrochemistry analytical electrochemistry solid and polymer electrolytes semiconductor photoelectrochemistry Cross listed with Chem 240 NANO 256 Microfluids 4 This course covers the design microfabrication operational principles basic transport processes and diverse applications of microfluidic and nanofluidic lab on a chip systems NANO 257 Polymer Science and Engineering 4 Quantitative basic understanding of different branches of polymer science varying from polymer chemistry characterization thermodynamics rheological properties smart materials self assembly in biopolymers natural and synthetic polymers and applications of polymers ranging from medicine to structure Cross listed with MATS 257 and BENG 242 Restricted to BE 75 MS 76 CE 75 and NA 75 majors NANO 258 Nanoscale Transport Phenomenon 4 Various nanoscale systems where macroscopic laws of mass heat and momentum transfer break down nonequilibrium statistical mechanics concepts such as transition state and Green Kubo theories and molecular simulations for modeling nanoscale transport issues will be introduced NANO 259 Heterogeneous Catalysis 4 Physics and chemistry of heterogeneous catalysis adsorption desorption kinetics chemical bonding isotherms kinetic models selection of catalysts poisoning experimental techniques Cross listed with CENG 253 NANO 260 Nanofabrication Reaction Engineering 4 Chemical reaction kinetics coupled with material and energy transport processes for fabrication of nanostructured materials and devices Chemical vapor deposition etching and patterning of films Nanoparticle nanofiber and nanotube growth Theory simulation and reactor design NANO 261 Nanoscale Energy Technology 4 Examines the role nanotechnology will play in addressing the many scientific and engineering challenges for new energy production Topics include nanotechnology s role in improving photovoltaics fuel cells batteries energy transmission and conversion of renewable green and nonrenewable sources NANO 262 Nanosensors 4 This course illustrates how the ability to tailor the properties of nanomaterials can be used for designing powerful sensing and biosensing devices Nanosensors based on metal nanoparticles semiconductor nanowires and nanocrystals and carbon nanotubes will be covered NANO 263 Magnetic Nanodevices 4 The basis of magnetism classical and quantum mechanical points of view Introduction to thin film and nanomagnetism including interfacial magnetism coupling and magneto transport Application of nanomagnetism in devices including magnetic recording MRAM magnetic processing and biomedical engineering NANO 264 Solid State and Nanochemistry 4 Course covers concept in nano and solid state chemistry for graduate students with the objective of understanding nanomaterials from a chemical perspective Topics include descriptive crystal chemistry structure determination free electron gas and dimensional solids tight binding approximation band structure Recommended preparation Background equivalent to NANO 203 NANO 265 Thermodynamics of Solids 4 The thermodynamics and statistical mechanics of solids Basic concepts equilibrium properties of alloy systems thermodynamic information from phase diagrams surfaces and interfaces crystalline defects Cross listed with MATS 201A MAE 271A and ECE 238A NANO 266 Quantum Mechanical Modeling of Materials and Nanostructures 4 Application of quantum mechanical modeling methods both solid state and computational chemistry in the study of materials and nanostructures density functional theory DFT and approximations Hartree Fock and beyond HF approximations hybrid density functional theory beyond DFT GW TDDFT ab initio molecular dynamics materials properties mechanical electrochemical electronic transport nano scale effects on properties from quantum mechanical simulations high throughput computation NANO 299 Graduate Research in Nanoengineering 1 12 Graduate research in nanoengineering S U grades only May be taken for credit four times for a maximum of twelve units Prerequisites consent of instructor Courses in Chemical Engineering CENG All undergraduate students enrolled in Chemical Engineering courses or admitted to the Chemical Engineering program are expected to meet prerequisite and performance standards i e students may not enroll in any Chemical Engineering courses or courses in another department which are required for the major prior to having satisfied prerequisite courses with a C or better The program does not consider D or F grades as adequate preparation for subsequent material Additional details are given under the program outline course descriptions and admission procedures for the Jacobs School of Engineering Lower Division CENG 1 The Scope of Chemical Engineering 1 Discussions of basic knowledge of the curriculum and faculty and the opportunities in chemical engineering for professional development Introduction to campus library and computer resources P NP grades only Prerequisites none CENG 4 Experience Chemical Engineering 1 Hands on team based laboratory activities to demonstrate modern applications of chemical engineering and the role of the chemical engineer in academia and industry Emphasis on teamwork safe laboratory practices and student directed problem solving This class is for CENG majors who are incoming freshmen to be taken their first year P NP grades only Prerequisites department approval required CENG 15 Engineering Computation Using Matlab 4 Introduction to solution of engineering problems using computational methods Formulating problem statements selecting algorithms writing computer programs and analyzing output using Matlab Computational problems from nanoengineering chemical engineering and materials science are introduced The course requires no prior programming skills Cross listed with NANO 15 Prerequisites none Upper Division CENG 100 Process Modeling and Computation in Chemical Engineering 4 Introduction to elementary numerical methods with applications to chemical engineering problems using a variety of problem solving strategies Error analysis Concepts of mathematical modeling material and energy balances and probability and statistics with applications to design problems Prerequisites Chem 6C or consent of instructor CENG 101A Introductory Fluid Mechanics 4 Kinematics and equation of motion hydrostatics Bernoulli s equation viscous flows turbulence pipe flow boundary layers and drag in external flows applications to chemical structural and bioengineering Students may not receive credit for both MAE 101A and CENG 101A Prerequisites admission to the major and grades of C or better in Phys 2A Math 20D or 21D and 20E or consent of instructor CENG 101B Heat Transfer 4 Conduction convection radiation heat transfer design of heat exchangers Students may not receive credit for both MAE 101C and CENG 101B Prerequisites admission to the major and a grade of C or better in CENG 101A CENG 101C Mass Transfer 4 Diffusive and convective mass transfer in solids liquids and gases steady and unsteady state mass transfer coefficients applications to chemical engineering and bioengineering Prerequisites admission to the major and grade of C or better in CENG 101A CENG 102 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 4 Thermodynamic behavior of pure substances and mixtures Properties of solutions phase equilibria Thermodynamic cycles Chemical equilibria for homogeneous and heterogeneous systems Prerequisites CENG 100 and Math 20D or consent of instructor CENG 113 Chemical Reaction Engineering 4 Principles of chemical reactor analysis and design Experimental determination of rate equations design of batch and continuous reactors optimization of selectivity in multiple reactions consideration of thermal effects and residence time distribution Introduction to multi phase reactors Prerequisites CENG 100 and Math 20D or consent of instructor CENG 114 Probability and Statistical Methods for Engineers 4 Probability theory conditional probability Bayes theorem discrete random variables continuous random variables expectation and variance central limit theorem graphical and numerical presentation of data least squares estimation and regression confidence intervals testing hypotheses Cross listed with NANO 114 Prerequisites Math 20F and MAE 8 or NANO 15 or CENG 15 CENG 120 Chemical Process Dynamics and Control 4 Examination of dynamic linear and linearized models of chemical processes Stability analysis Design of PID controllers Selection of control and manipulated variables Root locus Bode and Nyquist plots Cascade feed forward and ratio controls Prerequisites admission to the major and grades of C or better in Math 21D or Math 20D Students may not receive credit for both MAE 141A or MAE 143B and CENG

    Original URL path: http://ucsd.edu/catalog/courses/NANO.html (2016-02-01)
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  • NanoEngineering (NANO) Faculty
    Jokerst PhD NanoEngineering Darren Lipomi PhD NanoEngineering Shyue Ping Ong PhD NanoEngineering Sheng Xu PhD NanoEngineering Kesong Yang PhD NanoEngineering Lecturer s Aaron Drews PhD NanoEngineering Vlado Lubarda PhD NanoEngineering Justin Opatkiewicz PhD NanoEngineering Affiliated Faculty Adah Almutairi PhD Assistant Professor Pharmaceutical Sciences Prab Bandaru PhD Associate Professor Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Renkun Chen PhD Assistant Professor Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Karen Christman PhD Assistant Professor Bioengineering Seth M Cohen PhD Associate Professor Chemistry and Biochemistry Marye Anne Fox PhD Professor Chemistry and Biochemistry Andrew C Kummel PhD Professor Chemistry and Biochemistry Yu Hwa Lo PhD Professor Electrical and Computer Engineering Padmini Rangamani PhD Assistant Professor Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Michael J Sailor PhD Professor Chemistry and Biochemistry Gabriel A Silva PhD Assistant Professor Bioengineering Shankar Subramanian PhD Professor Bioengineering William R Trogler PhD Professor Chemistry and Biochemistry Shyni Varghese PhD Assistant Professor Bioengineering James K Whitesell PhD Professor Chemistry and Biochemistry Paul Yu PhD Professor Electrical and Computer Engineering Kang Zhang PhD Professor of Ophthalmology Health Sciences Professional Research Bahram Fathollahi PhD Staff Resource Associate Sabine Faulhaber MS Associate Development Engineer Weiwei Gao PhD Assistant Project Scientist Steve Horvath PhD Senior Development Engineer Wayne Neilson Development Technician Daryl Preece PhD Assistant Project Scientist Chemical Engineering Program CENG Professors Shaochen Chen PhD NanoEngineering Robert E Continetti PhD Chemistry and Biochemistry John E Crowell PhD Chemistry and Biochemistry Carl H Gibson PhD Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering David A Gough PhD Bioengineering Miroslav Krstic PhD Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Andrew C Kummel PhD Chemistry and Biochemistry Juan C Lasheras PhD Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Joanna M McKittrick PhD Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Bernhard O Palsson PhD Bioengineering Kalyanasundaram Seshadri PhD Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Jan B Talbot PhD NanoEngineering Program Director Daniel Tartakovsky PhD Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Joseph Wang PhD NanoEngineering

    Original URL path: http://ucsd.edu/catalog/faculty/NANO.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Structural Engineering
    the college and the breadth of general education The structural engineering program allows for twelve general education GE courses so that students can fulfill their college requirements In the ABET accredited programs students must develop a program that includes a total of at least twenty four units in the arts humanities and social sciences not including subjects such as accounting industrial management finance or personnel administration It should be noted however that some colleges may require more than twelve GE courses indicated in the curriculum tables Accordingly students in these colleges may take longer to graduate than the indicated four year schedule Students must consult with their college to determine which GE courses to take Professional Licensing All students are encouraged to take the Engineering in Training EIT examination as the first step in becoming licensed as a professional engineer PE Students graduating from an accredited program can take the PE examination after EIT certification and two years of work experience students graduating from a nonaccredited program can take the PE examination after EIT certification and four years of work experience For further information please contact your local Board of Registration for Professional Engineers Land Surveyors and Geologists or visit http www pels ca gov Structural Engineering ABET Accredited Program Program Mission and Objectives The BS structural engineering program is accredited by the ABET Inc Engineering Accreditation Commission Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology Accreditation is an assurance that the program meets established quality standards BS Structural Engineering Mission To provide a comprehensive education and training to engineers using a holistic approach to structural systems engineering by emphasizing and building on the commonality of engineering structures at the levels of materials mechanics analysis and design BS Structural Engineering Objectives Program objectives represent graduates performance three to five years after completing the BS program Take advantage of a strong technical education at the undergraduate level to prepare for successful professional careers in industry or to continue with a graduate education in their area of specialization Consistently and successfully apply fundamental structural engineering principles within their chosen engineering application area such as aerospace civil marine and mechanical Apply broad multidisciplinary skills necessary to accomplish professional objectives in a rapidly changing technological world Understand the ethical issues pertaining to engineering adopt industry standards of ethical behavior and apply appropriate communication and collaboration skills essential for professional practice BS Structural Engineering Outcomes Program outcomes are the expected knowledge skills attitudes and behaviors of students at the time of completing the BS program An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics science and engineering An ability to design and conduct experiments as well as being able to analyze and interpret data An ability to design a system component or process to meet desired needs An ability to function in multidisciplinary teams An ability to identify formulate and solve engineering problems An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility An ability to communicate effectively with written oral and visual means The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context A recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in lifelong learning A knowledge of contemporary issues An ability to use modern engineering techniques skills and computing tools necessary for engineering practice FALL WINTER SPRING FRESHMAN YEAR Math 20A Math 20B Math 20C GE SE 1 SE 2 2L Chem 6A Phys 2A Phys 2B 2BL GE 1 GE GE SOPHOMORE YEAR Math 20D Math 20F Math 20E Phys 2C 2CL SE 110A SE 102 SE 101A SE 101B SE 110B GE SE 9 SE 101C JUNIOR YEAR SE 121 SE 130A MAE 170 SE 103 SE 115 TE 2 GE GE SE 130B GE GE GE SENIOR YEAR SE 125 SE 131 SE 140 TE SE 120 FS FS 3 FS FS GE GE TE 1 In fulfilling the general education requirements GE students must take a total of at least twenty four units in the arts humanities and social sciences not including subjects such as accounting industrial management finance or personnel administration Twelve GE courses are listed here individual college requirements may be higher 2 Technical elective TE course must be an upper division or graduate course in the engineering sciences natural sciences or mathematics selected with prior approval of the department to meet ABET standards 3 Students must take one full focus sequence FS in a Civil Structures b Aerospace Structures c SHM NDE or d Geotechnical Engineering Students should note that not all focus sequence classes will be offered every year Engineering Sciences Nonaccredited Program FALL WINTER SPRING FRESHMAN YEAR Math 20A Math 20B Math 20C GE SE 1 SE 2 2L Chem 6A Phys 2A Phys 2B 2BL GE 1 GE GE SOPHOMORE YEAR Math 20D Math 20F Math 20E Phys 2C 2CL SE 110A SE 102 SE 101A SE 101B SE 110B GE SE 9 SE 101C JUNIOR YEAR SE 121 SE 130A MAE 170 SE 103 SE 115 TE 2 GE GE SE 130B GE GE GE SENIOR YEAR SE 125 SE 131 SE 140 TE SE 120 TE TE TE TE GE GE TE 1 In fulfilling the general education requirements GE students must take a total of at least twenty four units in the arts humanities and social sciences not including subjects such as accounting industrial management finance or personnel administration Twelve GE courses are listed here individual college requirements may be higher 2 Technical elective TE course must be an upper division or graduate course in the engineering sciences natural sciences or mathematics selected with prior approval of the department to meet ABET standards Policies and Procedures for Structural Engineering Undergraduate Students Admission to the Major Due to the large number of students interested in structural engineering undergraduate programs and the limited resources available to accommodate this demand the university has declared the majors in the Department of Structural Engineering BS structural engineering BS engineering sciences as impacted Effective fall 2015 admission will be limited to both majors BS

    Original URL path: http://ucsd.edu/catalog/curric/SE-ug.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Structural Engineering
    recommended to take it for at least one quarter in every subsequent year Focus Sequences Structural Analysis SE 201A Advanced Structural Analysis SE 201B Nonlinear Structural Analysis SE 202 Structural Stability SE 203 Structural Dynamics SE 204 Advanced Structural Dynamics SE 205 Nonlinear Mechanical Vibrations SE 206 Random Vibrations SE 215 Cable Structures Structural Design SE 151B Design of Prestressed Concrete SE 211 Advanced RC PC Design SE 212 Advanced Structural Steel Design SE 213 Bridge Design SE 214 Masonry Structures SE 220 Seismic Isolation and Energy Dissipation SE 223 Advanced Seismic Design of Structures SE 254 FRP Rehabilitation of Civil Structures Computational Mechanics SE 233 Computational Techniques in Finite Elements SE 276A Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics I SE 276B Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics II SE 276C Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics III SE 277 Error Control in Finite Element Analysis SE 278A Finite Element Methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics Earthquake Engineering SE 203 Structural Dynamics SE 206 Random Vibrations SE 220 Seismic Isolation and Energy Dissipation SE 221 Earthquake Engineering SE 222 Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering SE 223 Advanced Seismic Design of Structures SE 243 Soil Structure Interaction Geotechnical Engineering SE 222 Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering SE 241 Advanced Soil Mechanics SE 242 Advanced Foundation Engineering SE 243 Soil Structure Interaction SE 244 Numerical Methods in Geomechanics SE 250 Stability of Earth Slopes and Retaining Walls Advanced Composites SE 251B Mechanical Behaviors of Polymers and Composites SE 252 Experimental Mechanics and NDE SE 253A Mechanics of Laminated Composite Structures I SE 253B Mechanics of Laminated Composite Structures II SE 253C Mechanics of Laminated Anisotropy Plates and Shells SE 254 FRP Rehabilitation of Civil Structures Solid Mechanics SE 235 Wave Propagation in Elastic Media SE 252 Experimental Mechanics and NDE SE 271 Solid Mechanics for Structural and Aerospace Engineering SE 272 Theory of Elasticity SE 273 Anelasticity Advanced Structural Behavior SE 202 Structural Stability SE 204 Advanced Structural Dynamics SE 205 Nonlinear Mechanical Vibrations SE 224 Structural Reliability and Risk Analysis SE 206 Random Vibrations SE 252 Experimental Mechanics and NDE SE 265 Structural Health Monitoring Principles Students taking the Solid Mechanics focus sequence are required to take SE 271 SE 272 and one of these courses SE 273 SE 252 or SE 235 SE 207 Topics in Structural Engineering will be acceptable to use towards a focus sequence requirement pending petition and approval of the Graduate Affairs Committee GAC The thesis defense is the final examination for students enrolled in the MS thesis plan and must be conducted after completion of all course work Upon completion of the research project the student writes a thesis that must be successfully defended in an oral examination and public presentation conducted by a committee composed of three faculty members A complete copy of the student s thesis must be submitted to each member of the MS thesis committee comprised of a minimum of three faculty at least two weeks before the defense MS in Structural Engineering with Specialization in Health Monitoring Prognosis and Validated Simulations SHMP VS The MS in SHMP VS provides specialized multidisciplinary knowledge in the three technology areas of 1 sensing technology 2 data interrogation and 3 predictive modeling Many courses currently offered within the Jacobs School of Engineering may be grouped into numerous focus sequences within each technology area as shown in the following list A Sensing Technology Area Sensing Methodologies SE 252 Experimental Mechanics and NDE MAE 268 Frontier Micro Electro Mechanical Systems MEMS Materials Fabrication and Applications Data Acquisition Systems ECE 257B Principles of Wireless Networks ECE 258A B Digital Communications ECE 259CN Advanced Coding and Modulation for Digital Communications CSE 237A Introduction to Embedded Computing CSE 237B Software for Embedded Computing CSE 237C Validation Testing of Embedded Systems CSE 237D Design Automation and Prototyping for Embedded Systems Controls MAE 280A Linear Systems Theory MAE 280B Linear Control Design MAE 282 Adaptive Control MAE 284 Robust and Multivariable Control MAE 285 Optimal Control and Estimation B Data Interrogation Technology Area Signal Processing ECE 161A Introduction to Digital Signal Processing ECE 251AN SIO 207B Digital Signal Processing I ECE 251BN SIO 207C Digital Signal Processing II ECE 251CN Filter Banks and Wavelets ECE 251DN or SIO 207D Array Processing ECE 253A Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing ECE 254 Detection Theory ECE 255AN Information Theory System Identification MAE 283A Parameter Identification Theory and Methods MAE 283B Approximate Identification and Control ECE 256A B Time Series Analysis and Applications ECE 275A Parameter Estimation I ECE 275B Parameter Estimation II Pattern Recognition CSE 250A Artificial Intelligence Search and Reasoning CSE 250B Artificial Intelligence Learning CSE 254 Statistical Learning ECE 270A B C Neurocomputing Statistical Probabilistic Methods MTH 281A B C Mathematical Statistics CSE 254 Statistical Learning SE 206 Random Vibrations SE 224 Structural Reliability and Risk Analysis C Predictive Modeling Technology Area Structural Analysis SE 201A Advanced Structural Analysis SE 201B Nonlinear Structural Analysis SE 202 Structural Stability SE 203 Structural Dynamics SE 204 Advanced Structural Dynamics SE 224 Structural Reliability and Risk Analysis Finite Element MAE 232A Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics I MAE 232B Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics II MAE 232C Advances in Materials Computations SE 274 Nonlinear Finite Elemental Methods Solid Mechanics SE 271 Solid Mechanics for Structural and Aerospace Engineering SE 272 Theory of Elasticity SE 273 Anelasticity SE 252 Experimental Mechanics and NDE SE 235 Wave Propagation in Elastic Media Material Behavior Modeling MAE 233B Micromechanics Advanced Structural Behavior SE 205 Nonlinear Mechanical Vibrations SE 206 Random Vibrations SE 224 Structural Reliability and Risk Analysis SE 252 Experimental Mechanics and NDE SE 265 Structural Health Monitoring Principles Earthquake Engineering SE 203 Structural Dynamics SE 206 Random Vibrations SE 220 Seismic Isolation and Energy Dissipation SE 221 Earthquake Engineering SE 222 Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering SE 223 Advanced Seismic Design of Structures Advanced Composites SE 251B Mechanical Behaviors of Polymers and Composites SE 253A Mechanics of Laminated Composite Structures SE 254 FRP Rehabilitation of Civil Structures Two degree plans in SHMP VS will be offered MS Thesis Plan and MS Comprehensive Examination Plan Students in both plans must complete forty eight units of credit for graduation For both plans students must complete thirty six units of course work consisting of one focus sequence from each of the three technology areas A B and C listed above Any three of the courses listed under a specific topic area constitute a focus sequence Courses must be chosen in consultation with the student s adviser The remaining twelve units must be completed as graduate research SE 299 For the MS SHMP VS Comprehensive Examination Plan the twelve unit graduate research SE 299 must be conducted as a mentored research project This project is intended to provide a mentored practicum whereby students integrate knowledge learned from their technology areas into comprehensively solving a problem from structural health monitoring prognosis or model validation and uncertainty quantification at their discretion This project will emphasize professional practice with both oral and written communication of technical data and will include a strong design component The project will be presented to a committee of two faculty members in structural engineering and one from another department within the Jacobs School of Engineering or an adjunct faculty member in an appropriate area of focus For the MS SHMP VS Thesis Plan the twelve unit graduate research SE 299 culminates with the preparation of a research thesis The thesis must be successfully defended in an oral examination and public presentation conducted by a committee composed of three faculty members The committee will consist of two faculty members in structural engineering and one from another department within the Jacobs School of Engineering or an adjunct faculty member in an appropriate area of focus A complete copy of the student s thesis must be submitted to each member of the MS thesis committee at least two weeks prior to the defense Because of the inherent multidisciplinary nature of the MS SHMP VS research within SE 299 can be conducted at outside locations industry or government facilities In this case a scientist on location with an adjunct faculty appointment at UC San Diego will be part of the student s committee All students in the MS SHMP VS program are required to take a seminar course SE 290 each quarter they are registered Master of Advanced Studies Simulation Based Engineering SBE The Department of Structural Engineering offers the master of advanced studies MAS in simulation based engineering SBE The degree requires thirty six units of work including a capstone team project This program is for part time students with an adequate background in engineering All the requirements can be completed in two years with one or two courses taken each quarter Final Project Capstone Requirement No Thesis In the MAS SBE program an alternative plan requirement is satisfied by a four unit capstone project requirement Required Courses Students entering the MAS program in structural engineering for a degree in simulation based engineering will take courses in the Departments of Structural Engineering and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering The program requires eight four unit core courses totaling thirty two units and one four unit capstone team project course SBE 279 Applications of Simulation Based Engineering for a total of thirty six units All courses must be completed with an average grade of B and no grade below B The courses required of all students are as follows SBE 233 Computational Techniques in Finite Elements SBE 276A Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics I SBE 276B Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics II SBE 278A Finite Element Methods in Fluid Mechanics SBE 276C Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics III Three elective SE MAE courses drawn from the following list twelve units that students may choose according to their field of interest These courses are regular courses attended by MS and PhD students SE 278B Computational Fluid Structure Interaction SE 267 Validation of Computational Models currently taught under SE 207 SE 277 Error Control in Finite Element Analysis MAE 261 Cardiovascular Fluid Mechanics SE 253A Mechanics of Laminated Composite Structures I SE 253B Mechanics of Laminated Composite Structures II MAE 229A Mechanical Properties MAE 273A Dynamic Behavior of Materials Master of Advanced Studies Structural Health Monitoring SHM The Department of Structural Engineering offers the master of advanced studies MAS degree in structural health monitoring SHM The degree requires thirty six units of work including a capstone team project This program is for part time students with an adequate background in engineering All the requirements can be completed in two years with one or two courses taken each quarter Final Project Capstone Requirement No Thesis In the MAS SHM Program an alternative plan requirement is satisfied by a two two unit course capstone project requirement Required Courses Students entering the MAS program in structural engineering for a degree in structural health monitoring will undertake courses in the Departments of Structural Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering The program requires eight four unit core courses totaling thirty two units and two two unit capstone team project courses for a total of thirty six units All courses must be completed with an average grade of B and no grade below B The courses required of all students are as follows SHM 203 Structural Dynamics and Vibration SHM 224 Structural Reliability and Risk Modeling SHM 233 Computational Techniques in Finite Element SHM 252 Sensing and Nondestructive Evaluation Methods SHM 267 Validation and Verification of Computational Models SHM 270 Introduction to Digital Signal Processing SHM 271 Digital Signal Processing I SHM 229 Mechanical Properties SHM 265A B Integrated Structural Health Monitoring Capstone Course Doctoral Degree Program The PhD program is intended to prepare students for a variety of careers in research teaching and advanced professional practice in the broad sense of structural engineering encompassing civil and aerospace structures earthquake and geotechnical engineering composites and engineering mechanics Depending on the student s background and ability research is initiated as soon as possible All students in consultation with their advisers develop course programs that will prepare them for the departmental comprehensive examination and for their dissertation research However these programs of study and research must be planned to meet the time limits established to advance to candidacy and to complete the requirements for the degree Doctoral students who have passed the departmental comprehensive examination may take any course for an S U grade with the exception of any course that the student s departmental comprehensive or PhD candidacy examination committee stipulates must be taken in order to remove a deficiency It is strongly recommended that all structural engineering graduate students take a minimum of two courses other than research per academic year after passing the departmental comprehensive examination The department also offers a seminar course each quarter dealing with current research topics in Earthquake Engineering SE 290 Students must take SE 290 every quarter in the first year of graduate study and it is strongly recommended to take it for at least one quarter in every subsequent year All doctoral students will be required to take SE 200 Applied Mathematics in Structural Engineering prior to taking the departmental comprehensive exam Doctoral examinations A structural engineering PhD student is required to pass three examinations The first is a departmental comprehensive examination that should be taken within three to six quarters of full time graduate study and requires a 3 5 GPA This examination is intended to determine the student s ability to successfully pursue a research project at a level appropriate for the doctoral degree It is administered by at least four faculty three of whom must be in structural engineering The student is responsible for material pertaining to four focus areas One focus area can be satisfied by course work provided that all courses in that area have been taken at UC San Diego the grade in each course is B or better and the overall GPA in that area is at least 3 5 In order to insure appropriate breadth the focus areas should consist of the following a two focus areas within structural engineering which are closely related to the student s research interests b one focus area within structural engineering that is not directly related to the student s area of research and c one minor focus area outside the Department of Structural Engineering An update list of sample focus areas for PhD students is available in the structural engineering Graduate Handbook Minor areas too closely related to the major areas will not be approved by the SE Graduate Affairs Committee The Solid Mechanics Focus Sequence which is jointly taught by the Department of Structural Engineering and the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering cannot be used to satisfy the outside structural engineering requirement Students intending to specialize in the emerging areas of structural health monitoring damage prognosis and validated simulations are advised to take courses in the focus areas of Advanced Structural Behavior and elective courses MAE 283 MAE 261 ECE 251AN ECE 251BN ECE 254 and CSE 291 which can be used to satisfy the outside structural engineering requirement Since the examination areas must be approved by the Structural Engineering Graduate Affairs Committee students are advised to seek such approval well before their expected examination date preferably while planning their graduate studies Although students are not required to take particular courses in preparation for the departmental comprehensive examination the scope of the examination in each area is associated with a set of three graduate courses generally in focus areas offered or approved by the department A list of focus areas is available in the Structural Engineering Graduate Handbook A candidate can develop a sense of the level of knowledge expected to be demonstrated during the examination by studying the appropriate syllabi and or discussing the course content with faculty experienced in teaching the courses involved The departmental comprehensive examination may be a written or an oral examination at the discretion of the committee Teaching experience is required of all structural engineering PhD students prior to taking the PhD candidacy examination Teaching experience is defined as lecturing one hour per week in either a problem solving section or laboratory session for one quarter in an undergraduate course designated by the department The requirement can be fulfilled by serving as a teaching assistant or by taking SE 501 for academic credit Students must contact the Student Affairs Office to plan for completion of this requirement The PhD candidacy examination is the second examination required of structural engineering doctoral students In preparation for the PhD candidacy examination students must have completed the departmental comprehensive examination and the departmental teaching experience requirement obtained a faculty research adviser have identified a topic for their dissertation research and have made initial progress in that research At the time of application for advancement to candidacy a doctoral committee responsible for the remainder of the student s graduate program is appointed by the Graduate Council In accordance with Academic Senate Regulations 715 D A doctoral committee of five or more members shall be appointed by the dean of Graduate Studies under the authority of the Graduate Council The committee members shall be chosen from at least two departments and at least two members shall represent academic specialties that differ from the student s chosen specialty In all cases each committee must include one tenured UC San Diego faculty member from outside the student s major department The committee conducts the PhD candidacy examination during which students must demonstrate the ability to engage in dissertation research This involves the presentation of a plan for the dissertation research project A short written document describing the research plan must be submitted to each member of the committee at least two weeks before the PhD candidacy examination The committee may ask questions directly or indirectly related to the research project and general questions that it determines to be relevant Upon successful completion of this examination students are advanced to candidacy and are awarded

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  • Structural Engineering Courses
    131 Finite Element Analysis 4 Development of finite element models based upon the Galerkin method Application to static and dynamic heat conduction and stress analysis Formulation of initial boundary value problem models development of finite element formulas solution methods and error analysis and interpretation of results Prerequisites SE 101C or MAE 130C SE 121 SE 130B SE 140 Structures and Materials Laboratory 4 Introduction to concepts procedures and key issues of engineering design Problem formulation concept design configuration design parametric design and documentation Project management team working ethics and human factors Term project in model structure design Program or material fee may apply Prerequisites SE 103 SE 130B and senior standing in the major SE 142 Design of Composite Structures 4 Introduction to advanced composite materials and their applications Fiber and matrix properties micromechanics stiffness ply by ply stress hygrothermal behavior and failure prediction Lab activity will involve design analysis fabrication and testing of composite structure Prerequisites SE 110A or MAE 131A SE 110B and SE 160A SE 150 Design of Steel Structures 4 Design concepts and loadings for structural systems Working stress ultimate strength design theories Properties of structural steel Elastic design of tension members beams and columns Design of bolted and welded concentric and eccentric connections and composite floors Introduction to plastic design Prerequisites SE 130A SE 151A Design of Reinforced Concrete 4 Concrete and reinforcement properties Service and ultimate limit state analysis and design Design and detailing of structural components Prerequisites grade of C or better in SE 103 and SE 130A SE 151B Design of Prestressed Concrete 4 Time dependent and independent properties of concrete and reinforcing material Concept and application of prestressed concrete Service and ultimate limit state analysis and design of prestressed concrete structures and components Detailing of components Calculation of deflection and prestress losses Prerequisites grade of C or better in SE 151A SE 152 Seismic Design of Structures 4 Seismic design philosophy Ductility concepts Lateral force resisting systems Mechanisms of nonlinear deformation Methods of analysis Detailing of structural steel and reinforced concrete elements Lessons learned from past earthquakes Multistory building design project Prerequisites SE 130B SE 150 and SE 151A SE 154 Design of Timber Structures 4 Properties of wood and lumber grades Beam design Design of axially loaded members Design of beam column Properties of plywood and structural use panels Design of horizontal diaphragms Design of shear walls Design of nailed and bolted connections Prerequisites grade of C or better in SE 103 and SE 130A SE major SE 160A Aerospace Structural Mechanics I 4 Aircraft and spacecraft flight loads and operational envelopes three dimensional stress strain relations metallic and composite materials failure theories three dimensional space trusses and stiffened shear panels combined extension bend twist behavior of thin walled multicell aircraft and space vehicle structures modulus weighted section properties shear center Prerequisites SE 2 SE 2L SE 101B or MAE 130B and SE 110A or MAE 131A Priority enrollment given to engineering majors SE 160B Aerospace Structural Mechanics II 4 Analysis of aerospace structures via work energy principles and finite element analysis Bending of metallic and laminated composite plates and shells Static vibration and buckling analysis of simple and built up aircraft structures Introduction to wing divergence and flutter fastener analysis Prerequisites SE 101C or MAE 130C and SE 160A Priority enrollment given to engineering majors SE 163 Nondestructive Evaluation 4 Damage detection materials characterization Introduction to nondestructive evaluation Impedance based methods ultrasonics acoustic thermography shearography liquid penetrant proof testing stress coatings vibrational techniques Prerequisites grade of C or better in SE 110A and SE 110B or consent of instructor SE major SE 165 Structural Health Monitoring 4 A modern paradigm of structural health monitoring as it applies to structural and mechanical systems is presented Concepts in data acquisition feature extraction data normalization and statistical modeling will be introduced in an integrated context MATLAB based exercise Term project Use of computer resources Prerequisites SE 101C or MAE 130C SE 168 Structural System Testing and Model Correlation 4 Dynamic model testing of structures test planning execution actuation sensing and data acquisition signal processing data conditioning test troubleshooting Methods of updating finite element structural models to correlate with dynamic test results Model test correlation assessment in industrial practice Knowledge of Matlab strongly encouraged Prerequisites grade of C or better in SE 101C or MAE 130C and SE 131 SE 171 Aerospace Structures Repair 4 Review methods used to repair aerospace structures Emphasis on primary load bearing airframe structures and analysis design of substantiate repairs Identification of structural corrosion distress fatigue cracking damage tolerance integrity and durability of built up members patching health monitoring Use of computer resources Prerequisites SE 130B or SE 160A or consent of instructor SE 180 Earthquake Engineering 4 Elements of seismicity and seismology Seismic hazards Dynamic analysis of structures underground motion Elastic and inelastic response spectra Modal analysis nonlinear time history analysis Earthquake resistant design Seismic detailing Prerequisites grade of C or better in SE 110A and SE 130A Priority enrollment given to structural engineering majors SE 181 Geotechnical Engineering 4 General introduction to physical and engineering properties of soils Soil classification and identification methods Compaction and construction control Total and effective stress Permeability seepage and consolidation phenomena Shear strength of sand and clay Prerequisites grade of C or better in SE 110A or MAE 131A SE major SE 182 Foundation Engineering 4 Application of soil mechanics to the analysis design and construction of foundations for structures Soil exploration sampling and in situ testing techniques Stress distribution and settlement of structures Bearing capacities of shallow foundations Axial and lateral capacity of deep foundations earth pressures on retaining walls Prerequisites grade of C or better in SE 181 SE major SE 184 Ground Improvement 4 Concepts underpinning mechanical hydraulic chemical and inclusion based methods of ground improvement will be discussed Students will be able to understand the advantages disadvantages and limitations of the various methods and develop a conceptual design for the most appropriate improvement strategy Prerequisites SE 181 SE 192 Senior Seminar 1 The Senior Seminar is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members to explore an intellectual topic in structural engineering Topics will vary from quarter to quarter Enrollment is limited to twenty students with preference given to seniors Prerequisites SE major Department stamp and or consent of instructor SE 195 Teaching 2 4 Teaching and tutorial assistance in a SE course under supervision of instructor Not more than four units may be used to satisfy graduation requirements P NP grades only Prerequisites B average in major upper division standing and consent of department chair Department stamp required SE 197 Engineering Internship 1 4 An enrichment program available to a limited number of undergraduate students which provides work experience with industry government offices etc under the supervision of a faculty member and industrial supervisor Coordination of the Engineering Internship is conducted through UC San Diego s Academic Internship Program Prerequisites completion of ninety units with a 2 5 GPA and consent of department chair Department stamp required SE 198 Directed Study Group 4 Directed group study on a topic or in a field not included in the regular department curriculum by special arrangement with a faculty member P NP grades only Prerequisites consent of instructor or department stamp SE 199 Independent Study 1 4 Independent reading or research on a problem by special arrangement with a faculty member P NP grades only Prerequisites consent of instructor or department stamp Graduate SE 200 Applied Mathematics in Structural Engineering 4 This course is designed to give beginning students the basic preparation in mathematical methods required for graduate Structural Engineering courses Topics include linear algebra systems of ordinary differential equations diffusion and wave propagation problems integral transforms and calculus of variations Prerequisites graduate standing or approval of instructor SE 201A Advanced Structural Analysis 4 Application of advanced analytical concepts to structural engineering problems Analysis of frame structures using matrix methods and introduction to the finite element method Displacement based and force based beam element formulations Development of computer programs for structural analysis Use of computer resources Prerequisites graduate standing or consent of instructor SE 201B Nonlinear Structural Analysis 4 The course emphasizes the principles behind modern nonlinear structural analysis software It deals with the theory computer implementation and applications of methods of material and geometric nonlinear analysis Emphasis is on 2D and 3D frame structures modeled using 1D beam column elements Use of computer resources Prerequisites SE 201A or equivalent or consent of instructor SE 202 Structural Stability 4 Static dynamic and energy based techniques and predicting elastic stability Linear and nonlinear analysis of classical and shear deformable beams and plates Ritz Galerkin and finite element approaches for frames and reinforced shells Nonconservative aerodynamic divergence flutter and follower forces Recommended preparation SE 101A C and SE 110A or equivalent background in solid mechanics and structural dynamics Prerequisites graduate standing or consent of instructor SE 203 Structural Dynamics 4 Response of discrete linear structural systems to harmonic periodic and transient excitations Lagrangian mechanics Linearization of the equations of motion Free and forced vibrations of multi degree of freedom structures Normal mode frequency response and numerical methods Continuous systems Prerequisites graduate standing or consent of instructor SE 204 Advanced Structural Dynamics 4 Free and forced vibration of continuous systems such as axial and torsional vibrations of bars and transverse vibrations of various beams membranes and plates Euler Lagrange formulation using variational calculus Rayleigh Ritz method for approximation Applications in vibration suppression isolation Prerequisites graduate standing SE 205 Nonlinear Mechanical Vibrations 4 Advanced analytical techniques to understand nonlinearity in mechanical vibration Phase plane analysis instability and bifurcations Application in nonlinear structural resonance Introduction to chaotic dynamics advanced time series analysis and using chaotic dynamics in applications such as structural damage assessment Prerequisites SE 203 or consent of instructor graduate standing SE 206 Random Vibrations 4 Introduction to probability theory and random processes Correlation and power spectral density functions Estimation of correlation functions ergodicity Stochastic dynamic analysis of structures subjected to stationary and nonstationary fandom excitations Crossings first excursion probability distributions of peaks and extremes Recommended preparation Basic Knowledge of Probability Theory SE 125 or equivalent Prerequisites MAE 237 or SE 203 graduate standing SE 207 Topics in Structural Engineering 4 A course to be given at the discretion of the faculty in which topics of current interest in structural engineering will be presented SE 211 Advanced Structural Concrete 4 Properties of reinforcing steels concrete technology creep shrinkage and relaxation Mohr Coulomb failure criteria for concrete confinement momentcurvature and force displacement responses plastic design code compliant seismic design philosophy code compliant seismic design of structural walls Use of computer resources Recommended preparation SE 151A and SE 151B or equivalent background in basic RC PC design Prerequisites consent of instructor department approval required SE 212 Advanced Structural Steel Design 4 Load and Resistance Factor Design LRFD philosophy Behavior and design of steel elements for global and local buckling Background of seismic codes Ductility requirements and capability design concept Seismic design of steel moment frames and braced frames Prerequisites SE 201 and SE 150 or equivalent course or consent of instructor SE 213 Bridge Design 4 Design and analysis of bridge structures construction methods load conditions Load paths and distribution of dead and live loads Service strength and extreme event limit states and other load and resistance factor design LRFD principles Design of pre stressed concrete bridges Special problems in analysis concrete box girders curved and skewed bridges environmental and seismic loads Conceptual preliminary bridge design project Recommended preparation SE 223 Advanced Seismic Design of Structures Prerequisites SE 201A and SE 211 SE 214 Masonry Structures 4 Analysis and design of unreinforcced and reinforced masonry structure using advanced analytical techniques and design philosophies Material properties stability and buckling of unreinforced masonry Flexural strength shear strength stiffness and ductility of reinforced masonry elements Design for seismic loads Prerequisites SE 151A B or equivalent basic reinforced concrete course or consent of instructor graduate standing SE 215 Cable Structures 4 The course deals with cable structures from a structural mechanics point of view The theoretical and practical aspects of the application of cables to moorings guyed structures suspension bridges cable stayed bridges and suspended membranes are discussed Prerequisites graduate standing or consent of instructor SE 220 Seismic Isolation and Energy Dissipation 4 Concepts advantages and limitations of seismic isolation techniques fundamentals of dynamic response under seismic excitation spectral analysis damping energy approach application to buildings and structures Prerequisites background in structural dynamics or consent of instructor SE 221 Earthquake Engineering 4 Introduction to plate tectonics and seismology Rupture mechanism measures of magnitude and intensity earthquake occurrence and relation to geologic tectonic processes Probabilistic seismic hazard analysis Strong earthquake ground motion site effects on ground motion structural response soil structure interaction design criteria code requirements Use of computer resources Prerequisites SE 203 or consent of instructor graduate standing SE 222 Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering 4 Influence of soil conditions on ground motion characteristics dynamic behavior of soils computation of ground response using wave propagation analysis and finite element analysis evaluation and mitigation of soil liquefaction soil structure interaction lateral pressures on earth retaining structures analysis of slope stability Recommended preparation SE 181 or equivalent Prerequisites department approval and graduate standing SE 223 Advanced Seismic Design of Structures 4 Fundamental concepts in seismic design Innovative earthquake resistant system Passive energy dissipation systems Metallic friction viscoelastic dampers Self centering devices Tuned mass dampers Theory of seismic isolation Metallic bearings Lead extrusion bearings Sliding bearings Laminated rubber bearings Lead rubber bearings Prerequisites department approval and graduate standing SE 224 Structural Reliability and Risk Analysis 4 Review of probability theory and random processes Fundamentals of structural reliability theory First and second order and simulation methods of reliability analysis Structural component and system reliability Reliability sensitivity measures Bayesian reliability analysis methods Bases for probabilistic design codes Use of computer resources Recommended preparation basic knowledge of probability theory e g SE 125 Prerequisites graduate standing SE 226 Geotechnical Groundwater Engineering 4 This course will treat quantitative aspects of the flow of uncontaminated groundwater as it influences the practice of geotechnical engineering We will cover flow through porous media generalized Darcy s law groundwater modeling confined and unconfined systems well hydraulics land subsidence and construction dewatering Prerequisites SE 241 or consent of instructor SE 233 Computational Techniques in Finite Elements 4 Practical application of the finite element method to problems in solid mechanics including basic preprocessing and postprocessing Topics include element types mesh refinement boundary conditions dynamics eigenvalue problems and linear and nonlinear solution methods SE 235 Wave Propagation in Elastic Media 4 Wave propagation in elastic media with emphasis on waves in unbound media and on uniform and layered half spaces Fundamental aspects of elastodynamics Application to strong motion seismology earthquake engineering dynamics of foundations computational wave propagation and nondestructive evaluations Prerequisites graduate standing or consent of instructor SE 236 Wave Propagation in Continuous Structural Elements 4 Propagation of elastic waves in thin structural elements such as strings rods beams membranes plates and shells An approximate strength of materials approach is used to consider propagation of elastic waves in these elements and obtain the dynamic response to transient loads Prerequisites graduate standing or consent of instructor SE 241 Advanced Soil Mechanics 4 Advanced treatment of topics in soil mechanics including state of stress pore pressure consolidation and settlement analysis shear strength of cohesionless and cohesive soils mechanisms of ground improvement and slope stability analysis Concepts in course reinforced by laboratory experiments SE 242 Advanced Foundation Engineering 4 Advanced treatment of topics in foundation engineering including earth pressure theories design of earth retaining structures bearing capacity ground improvement for foundation support analysis and design of shallow and deep foundations including drilled piers and driven piles SE 243 Soil Structure Interaction 4 Advanced treatment of the dynamic interaction between soils and structures Dynamic response of shallow and embedded foundations Kinematic and inertial interaction General computational and approximate analytical methods of analysis Prerequisites SE 200 and SE 203 graduate standing SE 244 Numerical Methods in Geomechanics 4 Application of finite element method to static and dynamic analysis of geotechnical structures One 2 and 3 D static and seismic response of earth structures slopes Foundation systems Pore pressure generation effects during cycle loading System identification using strong motion downhole array data Use of computer resources required Prerequisites graduate standing SE 247 Ground Improvement 4 Concepts underpinning mechanical hydraulic chemical and inclusion based methods of ground improvement will be discussed Students will be able to understand the advantages disadvantages and limitations of the various methods and develop a conceptual design for the most appropriate improvement strategy Recommended Preparation SE 181 or equivalent background in the physics and engineering properties of soil Prerequisites graduate standing or consent of instructor SE 250 Stability of Earth Slopes and Retaining Walls 4 Fundamental and advanced concepts of stability analysis for earth slopes and retaining walls with soil backfill Topics shear strength effective total stress analysis infinite finite slopes reinforced soil slopes lateral earth pressure retaining wall design and reinforced soil retaining walls Recommended preparation SE 181 or equivalent background Prerequisites department approval and graduate standing SE 251A Processing of Polymers and Composites 4 Introduction to processing and fabrication methods of polymers and composite materials Processing techniques facilities and equipment material processing microstructure interaction materials selection form and quality control Extrusion injection molding blow molding compression molding thermoforming casting foaming Wet layup sprayup autoclave cure SMC RTM resin infusion winding and fiber placement pultrusion Process induced defects and environmental considerations Cross listed with MATS 261A Prerequisites graduate standing SE 251B Mechanical Behaviors of Polymers and Composites 4 Material science oriented course on polymers and composites Mechanical properties of polymers micromechanisms of elastic and plastic deformations fracture and fatigue of polymers and composites Cross listed with MATS 261B Prerequisites graduate standing required SE 252 Experimental Mechanics and NDE 4 Requirements for strain measurements electrical resistance strain gages fiberoptic strain gages wave propagation ultrasonic testing impact

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  • Structural Engineering Faculty
    W Elgamal PhD G A Hegemier PhD Emeritus T Hutchinson PhD PE H Kim PhD Vice Chair J B Kosmatka PhD P Krysl PhD F Kuester PhD F Lanza di Scalea PhD J E Luco PhD Y Qiao PhD J Restrepo PhD F Seible PhD PE Emeritus P B Shing PhD Chair M Todd PhD C M Uang PhD Associate Professors H A Kim PhD J S McCartney PhD G

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  • Environmental Studies
    ENVR minor Petitionable courses are either new and therefore not yet approved as applicable or are topics courses that focus on environmental matters only in particular quarters Petitionable courses may be approved by petition to the minor during the quarters in which they appear in the ENVR quarterly lists Quarterly Lists Each quarter when the upcoming quarter s Schedule of Classes is published the Environmental Studies quarterly list is available in H SS 2126 and on the website The quarterly list is an important comprehensive source of information about ENVR course offerings as well as those from departments throughout the campus It identifies applicable as well as petitionable courses for a given quarter For reference the office and the website maintain archives of quarterly lists The minor is structured as follows Required Environmental Studies 30 usually offered in the fall quarter Environmental Studies 110 usually offered in the winter quarter need not be taken consecutively Required Five additional courses at least four in the upper division from the following two groups At least one course must be taken from Group A and two from Group B Group A Natural Sciences BILD 3 Organismic and Evolutionary Biology BIEB 121 General Ecology Laboratory BIEB 131 Marine Invertebrate Ecology Laboratory BIEB 140 Biodiversity BIEB 165 Behavioral Ecology Laboratory BIEB 166 Animal Behavior and Communication BIEB 176 Conservation and the Human Predicament cross listed with ANBI 132 Chemistry 15 Chemistry of the Universe Chemistry 149A Environmental Chemistry Chemistry 149B Environmental Chemistry Chemistry 173 Atmospheric Chemistry Environmental Studies 102 Selected Topics in Environmental Studies when taught from a natural sciences perspective Environmental Systems 101 The Living Earth Environmental Systems 103 The Human Earth Environmental Systems 120 Science and Environmental Writing MAE 118A Energy Nonnuclear Energy Technologies Physics 12 Energy and the Environment Science Technology Public

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  • Environmental Studies Courses
    102 Selected Topics in Environmental Studies 4 An interdisciplinary course focusing on one of a variety of topics related to environmental studies such as environmental policy and politics foreign study in environmental problems environmental history nature writers ethics and the environment May be repeated three times for credit as topics vary Prerequisites upper division standing or consent of instructor 110 Environmental Law 4 Explores environmental policy in the United States and the ways in which it is reflected in law The social and political issues addressed include environmental justice and environmental racism as well as the role of government in implementing environmental law Prerequisites upper division standing or consent of instructor 120 Coastal Ecology 4 Explores the diverse ecosystems of coastal San Diego County salt marsh rocky intertidal sandy beach etc in the classroom and in the field with attention to basic principles of field ecology natural history and techniques for collecting ecological data Course and or materials fee may apply Prerequisites upper division standing or consent of instructor 130 Environmental Issues Social Sciences 4 Explores contemporary environmental issues from the perspective of the social sciences It includes the cultural framing of environmental issues and appropriate social action the analysis of economic incentives and constraints and a comparison of policy approaches Prerequisites upper division standing or consent of instructor 140 Wilderness and Human Values 4 Wilderness plays a central role in the consciousness of American environmentalists and serves as focal point for public policies recreation and political activism This course explores its evolving historical philosophical ecological and aesthetic meanings and includes guest speakers and a field component Prerequisites upper division standing or consent of instructor 141 Wilderness and Human Values Workshop 2 A course to prepare students to serve as discussion leaders for ENVR 140 Wilderness and Human Values Includes

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