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  • University of Florida News
    great white GAINESVILLE Fla The great white shark is one of the largest living predatory animals and a magnet for media sensationalism yet its evolutionary history is as misunderstood as its role as a menace Nov 13 Memory loss thinking problems after surgery the subject of new UF research GAINESVILLE Fla Older adults may be at risk for memory and thinking problems after surgery and a new 2 3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health s National Institute of Nursing Research will help University of Florida researchers use brain imaging studies to determine which patients are most likely to be affected InsideUF Campus Nov 8 Homecoming means some changes in RTS service Friday Nov 8 Winners of global photo competition announced Nov 8 BélO to bring unique Haitian sound to Squitieri Studio Theatre Nov 13 14 Nov 8 Proctor programs explore slave resistance Holocaust survivors women s issues Nov 7 UF to mark International Education Week with several events Archives UF In The News Nov 7 Newsweek Mark Gold Nov 7 Associated Press Susan Gillespie Nov 7 Orlando Sentinel Paul Doering Nov 7 Miami Herald Daniel Smith Nov 7 Reuters Daniel Smith Archives Snapshot Ceremonial chomp Multimedia Video Jan 12 Parkinson s Symptoms Jan 5 Back Pain Relief Op Eds Jun 30 On higher education lessons from the north UF News on Twitter UFNow InsideUF UF on Facebook Are you ready for the last home football game of the season Go Gators Beat Jac 7 hours ago What does quot Go Gators quot mean to you 12 hours ago Upcoming Events Fri Nov 16 8 00 AM 8 00 PM International Education Week 2012 UF Campus Fri Nov 16 6 00 PM 9 00 PM Open House Art Bash Fine Arts Buildings A B C Gainesville Weather 61

    Original URL path: http://news.ufl.edu/ (2012-11-16)
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  • University of Florida News – Research
    2012 Memory loss thinking problems after surgery the subject of new UF research GAINESVILLE Fla Older adults may be at risk for memory and thinking problems after surgery and a new 2 3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health s National Institute of Nursing Research will help University of Florida researchers use brain imaging studies to determine which patients are most likely to be affected Filed under Health Research on Tuesday November 13 2012 New study describes perils of delivering anti malarial drugs through private sector GAINESVILLE Fla Getting high quality anti malarial drugs to people in places like Zanzibar and Mozambique is a tricky business Filed under Health Research on Thursday November 8 2012 UF IFAS scientists discover enzyme that improves flavor of ripening tomatoes GAINESVILLE Fla The enzyme CXE1 will never be a household name but a new University of Florida study suggests that tomato lovers owe it a debt of thanks nonetheless without it their favorite fruit might not be so tasty Filed under Agriculture Research Sciences on Thursday November 1 2012 ADHD drugs do not raise risk of serious heart conditions in children study shows GAINESVILLE Fla Children taking central nervous system stimulants such as Adderall and Ritalin do not face an increased risk of serious heart conditions during treatment according to a new University of Florida study that confirms findings reported in 2011 Published in the British Medical Journal in August the study contributes to a decade long clinical and policy debate of treatment risks for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD Filed under Family Health Research on Wednesday October 31 2012 UF IFAS research Typical populations of bedbugs can cause harmful blood loss in humans GAINESVILLE Fla For years bedbugs have been turning up in sometimes odd and random places

    Original URL path: http://news.ufl.edu/research/ (2012-11-16)
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  • University of Florida News – Rare human parasite found in U.S. horse for the first time, University of Florida researchers report
    bites of infected sandflies The disease shows up most commonly in two forms cutaneous which causes sores on the skin and is self healing and visceral the most severe form which affects the entire body and is almost always fatal if left untreated After malaria leishmaniasis is the leading parasitic cause of death in humans The disease has been found in four continents and is considered to be endemic in 88 countries including 16 developed nations according to the World Health Organization The WHO estimates the worldwide prevalence at 12 million cases with about 350 million people at risk of infection and about 60 000 people dying from the disease each year Leishmaniasis is rare in people in the U S It really hasn t been a disease that has affected Americans but there are really good data with climate change models that predict sandfly ranges will expand making this disease much more of a threat because of global warming said co author James Wellehan Jr a veterinarian from the UF research team who confirmed the presence of the disease in the Florida horse by analyzing the genes of the parasite The visceral form of leishmaniasis is endemic in foxhounds in the U S associated with a parasite species different from the one found in the Florida horse But aside from some regional transmission in the Southwest most of the leishmaniasis skin infection cases in the U S are believed to have occurred in animals brought in from countries where the disease is common or in people who had recently spent time in those countries Thousands of people serving in the U S military have returned from Iraq and Afghanistan with cutaneous or visceral leishmaniasis said Christine Petersen an associate professor of veterinary pathology at Iowa State University s College of Veterinary Medicine and an expert on Leishmania transmission immune responses and veterinary disease who was not involved in the study In a few cases these individuals have brought dogs back with them that also have leishmaniasis But the horse diagnosed at UF had no history of travel outside of the eastern U S The pregnant 10 year old Morgan mare was treated as an outpatient at the University of Florida Large Animal Hospital for sores inside her left ear A biopsy done in the field revealed what looked like the rare parasite within inflammatory cells in the tissue Further tissue sampling and genetic analysis were used to confirm the identity of the disease causing organism Often leishmaniasis of the skin will resolve without medical treatment But the mare s sores worsened over time a development the veterinarians attributed to the pregnancy Many of the horses in other countries that have been diagnosed with leishmaniasis were pregnant so we think perhaps these horses have pregnancy altered immune systems and are therefore more vulnerable to the disease Reuss said The drug used to treat horses with the disease in other parts of the world isn t readily available in the U

    Original URL path: http://news.ufl.edu/2012/11/15/leishmaniasis/ (2012-11-16)
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  • University of Florida News – Study: Up to three times as many known marine species still undescribed
    in one place All study co authors are contributors to a global marine life inventory known as WoRMS or the World Register of Marine Species The database lists more than 90 percent of marine species and researchers used it to create tables to show how diversity is distributed among different types of organisms Each co author an expert on a different group compiled its known diversity and estimated the number of collected species that remain undescribed in museum collections how many may be cryptic or unrecognizably different and how many remain undiscovered in the wild More than 20 000 species have been discovered during the last decade and if trends continue most species will be discovered this century according to the study There are also about 65 000 undescribed species already in collections The entire ocean contains less than 300 000 species described to date and that includes everything from dolphins to worms to single celled algae Paulay said Because it s so connected there s less diversity in the ocean than on land There s still a lot more to be discovered but it s a manageable number so we can go after it and really understand the magnitude of marine biodiversity Paulay is an expert on sea cucumbers which are grouped together with sea stars sea lilies and sea urchins in the phylum Echinodermata Sea cucumbers are bizarre among echinoderms because their skeleton is reduced to microscopic bits so the animals have secondarily become worms Paulay said They occur worldwide in the deep sea and range from less than ¼ inch to about 10 feet long For the study Paulay organized the more than 2 400 named sea cucumber species and determined about 1 700 are valid with the remainder being duplicate names proposed for the same species The most abundant conspicuous large organisms you see on the ocean floor which is most of the planet are echinoderms especially sea cucumbers Paulay said They are very important down there recycling sediment from the ocean bottom or eating suspended particles floating around in the ocean and they are obviously food sources for other animals Nancy Knowlton a marine scientist at the Smithsonian Institution s National Museum of Natural History said the study is interesting because it differs from conclusions published in a 2011 PLOS Biology study co authored by Camilo Mora that estimates there are about 2 2 million eukaryotic marine species with about 91 percent still undescribed It s really nice to see a very carefully documented analysis that points to these lower numbers but I think the jury is still out Knowlton said Until different methods start giving us the same answer it s going to be difficult to know where the truth really lies But this paper is a very important step in the process of getting an answer for this question EDITORS STORY MAY END HERE One of the discrepancies with estimating how many species remain to be discovered has to do with researchers knowledge

    Original URL path: http://news.ufl.edu/2012/11/15/marine-biodiversity/ (2012-11-16)
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  • University of Florida News – Strategies to control crazy ants taking shape for UF/IFAS researchers
    First it s crucial to attack the problem early in the year preferably in February or March before the weather warms up and the ants begin breeding She says to bait early and bait according to label directions Professionals should use baits after applying a contact insecticide to reduce ant numbers but be careful not to place baits where they ll be contaminated by contact insecticides Also county extension offices can help professionals access continuing education materials with detailed information about the insect and treatment options For homeowners Calibeo suggests seeking professional help immediately We haven t seen anyone who successfully dealt with it on their own she said However there are several things homeowners can do to reduce the risk of attracting a crazy ant infestation said Faith Oi a UF IFAS assistant extension scientist and Calibeo s adviser The insects nest outdoors in damp confined spaces so it s important to remove leaf litter storm debris and other yard waste that could provide shelter she said They also need water to survive so residents should fix leaky outdoor faucets pipes and irrigation systems and minimize standing water sources such as pet bowls and flower pots In the spring and summer it s a good idea to check yards for established colonies Look for golden brown ants running erratically on structures vegetation or the ground Also crazy ants do not build mounds The species is often referred to as the Caribbean crazy ant but it appears that name may be misleading Until recently it was thought that well publicized infestations in Florida were caused by a species present in the state for half a century Nylanderia pubens But a research paper published this year showed that the crazy ants swarming in Jacksonville and Gainesville were actually the species Nylanderia

    Original URL path: http://news.ufl.edu/2012/11/15/crazy-ants/ (2012-11-16)
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  • University of Florida News – New ancient shark species gives insight into origin of great white
    specimens to the Florida Museum of Natural History on the UF campus in December 2009 The impetus of this project was really the fact that Gordon Hubbell donated a majority of his fossil shark collection to the Florida Museum Ehret said Naming the shark in his honor is a small tip of the hat to all the great things he has done to advance paleontology Ehret and co authors published an initial study describing the shark specimens in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology in 2009 but dates for the site reflected information from a 1985 study about the Pisco Formation he said With Hubbell s hand drawn maps and descriptions of the landscape researchers returned to the site and found the exact spot the fossils were discovered Scientists extracted more accurate age estimates from mollusk shells in the fossil horizon to determine the shark species was from the late Miocene about 6 5 million years ago rather than the early Pliocene about 4 5 million years ago The new dates will also be useful for better understanding other fossils found in the rich Pisco Formation which include new whale marine sloth and terrestrial vertebrate species The thing that was remarkable to me was that these fossils came from right out in the desert and this was before GPS so Dana had only an approximate notion of where it was said Florida Museum of Natural History Director Douglas Jones a study co author who conducted strontium isotope dating of the fossils But after a few days of looking we were able to find this deposit and Dana found the rest of the missing shark s teeth Researchers determined Hubbell s white shark was related to ancient broad toothed mako sharks by comparing the physical shapes of shark teeth to one another

    Original URL path: http://news.ufl.edu/2012/11/14/origin-of-great-white/ (2012-11-16)
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  • University of Florida News – Memory loss, thinking problems after surgery the subject of new UF research
    of postoperative cognitive dysfunction many years ago the problem has only recently received the proper attention it deserves with experts such as Dr Price focusing their research efforts in this area said Dr Thomas Floyd a professor of anesthesiology at Stony Brook University Hospital in New York who is not involved in the UF study Price said one of the best ways to pinpoint who may develop postoperative cognitive dysfunction may be to actually look at patients brains using MRI For example certain changes within the brain s white matter the tissue through which messages travel across the brain may indicate the potential for memory and thinking problems that could worsen with surgery The UF study will focus on patients undergoing a total knee replacement one of the most common orthopedic procedures A half million Americans receive new knees each year according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association As our population ages the growing number of seniors expect to age well and many choose to undergo procedures to decrease pain and improve mobility and quality of life thus the explosion in joint replacement surgeries Floyd said But a joint replacement will be most effective in patients who do not develop cognitive problems after surgery In the study supported in part by UF s Clinical and Translational Science Award from the NIH s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences 80 total knee replacement candidates age 60 and older will receive cognitive testing and MRI brain scans before and after surgery Using sophisticated imaging methods the investigators will look for brain biomarkers that are associated with cognitive problems such as white matter abnormalities and changes to small blood vessels Researchers will monitor patients up to one year after surgery Results will be compared with those from

    Original URL path: http://news.ufl.edu/2012/11/13/memory-loss/ (2012-11-16)
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  • University of Florida News – Homecoming means some changes in RTS service Friday
    8 11 15 24 25 and 75 will follow their regular Fall 2012 schedule There will be regular ADA service Also on Friday Campus Shuttle Routes 117 Park N Ride 2 118 Park N Ride 1 120 West Circulator Frat Row Route 122 UF North South Circulator 125 Lakeside 126 UF East West Circulator and 127 East Circulator Sorority Row will operate on a reduced service schedule There will be no service on Route 121 Commuter Lot and Route 119 Family Housing will follow its regular fall 2012 service During the Gator Homecoming Parade on Friday RTS will have route changes beginning at 10 a m and lasting until the parade route is reopened to regular traffic Historically this has been around 2 p m There will be route changes on City Fixed Routes 1 5 6 8 10 13 15 25 34 43 118 119 120 122 125 and 127 There are no detours in service during the parade on the remaining City Fixed Routes On Saturday all City Fixed and Campus Shuttle Routes will follow their regular Saturday schedule Gator Aider service will be available for Gator Growl on Friday November 9 from the Oaks Mall only with normal football game shuttle service on Saturday beginning at 9 15 a m For additional details on the Homecoming reduced service schedule parade route modifications and general schedule information visit the RTS Web site at www go rts com or call 352 334 2600 For additional information on campus transportation and parking please visit www parking ufl edu or call 352 392 7275 30 Read more campus news from InsideUF Share Bookmark this story Archives by Category Audio Economic Impact Haiti Earthquake InsideUF Campus Happenings In Focus Note This Print Edition Seen Heard Top Stories Voices Column Multimedia Op Eds

    Original URL path: http://news.ufl.edu/2012/11/08/homecoming-bus/ (2012-11-16)
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