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  • College of Liberal Arts and Sciences | The University of Florida
    Deadline for Nominations Friday November 20 2015 The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is now accepting nominations for the Undergraduate Teacher Advisers of the Year awards for the current academic year Nominate your favorite Liberal Arts and Sciences teacher or advisor for a teaching advising award The guidelines and nomination forms can be found on Guidelines for Undergraduate Teacher Advisers of the Year Awards Nomination Form for the Professional Advising Award Word Nomination Form for the Teaching Award Word Nomination Form for the Faculty Advising Mentoring Award Word Please return nomination forms to arlenew ufl edu or 2014 Turlington Hall Call for 2015 2016 Doctoral Dissertation Advisor Mentoring Award The Graduate School has announced the Doctoral Dissertation Advising Mentoring award program for 2015 2016 Procedures and deadlines can be found on the Graduate School website Deadline for Nominations to the college Friday October 16 2015 Hundreds turn out to leave their mark on new chemistry building September 15 2015 Almost a year after the groundbreaking ceremony for the University of Florida s new chemistry chemical biology at the corner of University Avenue and Buckman Drive hundreds gathered to leave their signature on a one ton beam that will be placed on the tallest portion of the building Read More Explore Our Majors An education in the liberal arts and sciences prepares students for a wide range of careers Learn more about our majors and the career opportunities they provide Inside Higher Education website Liberal Arts Degrees Have Proven Economic Value Professor of Math Named SIAM Fellow Congratulations to Professor William Hager for being named a 2015 Fellow in the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics He is being honored for contributions to optimal control optimization theory and numerical optimization algorithms Hager is a co director of the Center for Applied Optimization here at UF His research work focuses on numerical analysis optimization optimal control and lightning The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics SIAM headquartered in Philadelphia Pennsylvania is an international society of over 14 000 individual members including applied and computational mathematicians and computer scientists as well as other scientists and engineers Members from 85 countries are researchers educators students and practitioners in industry government laboratories and academia The Society which also includes nearly 500 academic and corporate institutional members serves and advances the disciplines of applied mathematics and computational science by publishing a variety of books and prestigious peer reviewed research journals by conducting conferences and by hosting activity groups in various areas of mathematics SIAM provides many opportunities for students including regional sections and student chapters Further information is available at here Two Physics Distinguished Professors Win Top Awards in Their Fields Pierre Ramond has been awarded the 2015 Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics for his pioneering foundational discoveries in supersymmetry and superstring theory in particular the dual model of fermions and the theory of the Kalb Ramond field Arthur Hebard and colleagues Allen Goldman U Minnesota Aharon Kapitulnik Stanford U and Matthew Fisher U

    Original URL path: http://www.clas.ufl.edu/ (2015-11-04)
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  • News 2014 | UF College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
    the University of Florida s new chemistry chemical biology at the corner of University Avenue and Buckman Drive hundreds gathered to leave their signature on a one ton beam that will be placed on the tallest portion of the building Skanska the development company building the facility and UF sponsored a beam signing and topping out ceremony on the construction site on Friday Topping out is an interesting tradition in construction and generally relates to installing the last and highest beam in the building said UF s Frank Javaheri senior project manager for the building It is a mini goal within the major goal and a reminder that this portion of the milestone is completed Guests including workers faculty and staff students and alumni also signed two columns on the ground floor Alumnus Jorge Quintana was among those who signed the beam and columns I hope my children will someday attend UF and I ll be able to say I ve literally left my mark on the university he said When completed next June the 67 million facility will provide 110 493 square feet of space for undergraduate and graduate education including an entire floor devoted to chemical biology and chemical synthesis College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Dean David Richardson said he is having the best year of his 30 year career at UF largely because of this new construction Richardson a chemistry professor has long advocated for a state of the art building to replace the outdated and outmoded facilities He thanked the workers at the ceremony saying Thousands of students will pass through these halls that you have worked so hard to build Where you are sitting now will become a major hub for research learning and innovation at the University of Florida UF and Gran Telescopio

    Original URL path: http://www.clas.ufl.edu/events/news.html (2015-11-04)
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  • Bookbeat | October 2015 | University of Florida College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
    that offer a way out of the daily routine and allow the traveler to escape a situation at home Available for purchase from palgrave macmillan Getting In David G Oppenheimer http people clas ufl edu oppenhe associate professor of biology at the University of Florida and Paris Grey research scientist and undergraduate research mentor in Dr Oppenheimer s research laboratory Available from Amazon books Getting In helps undergraduate students find the perfect research experience while preparing them for the challenges that will be part of their life in the lab Getting In starts with an overview designed to help students examine what they want to gain from a research experience what is realistic to achieve with the commitment they are willing to make and gain a solid understanding of what will be expected of them from their research mentor In addition Getting In includes direct specific advice on how to search apply and interview for research positions and includes step by step strategies on how to master time management and professionalism during those processes Tokaido Texts and Tales Tokaido gojusan tsui by Kuniyoshi Hiroshige and Kunisada Ann Wehmeyer is associate professor of Japanese and linguistics at the University of Florida and the translator of Motoori Norinaga s Kojiki den Book 1 Throughout the Edo period 1615 1868 the Tokaido was the most vital road in a network of highways across Japan Connecting Edo modern day Tokyo and Kyoto the road and its fifty three rest stations became a popular theme for artistic expression in a variety of mediums Read More Andreas Marks is head of the Japanese and Korean Art Department at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and the author of Kunisada s Tokaido Riddles in Japanese Woodblock Prints Laura Allen is curator of Japanese art at the Asian Art

    Original URL path: http://www.clas.ufl.edu/bookbeat/201510_bookbeat.html (2015-11-04)
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  • Bookbeat | July 2015 | University of Florida College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
    and Gender Research Available from University of Chicago Press Social critics have long lamented America s descent into a culture of narcissism as Christopher Lasch so lastingly put it fifty years ago From first world problems to political correctness from the Oprahfication of emotional discourse to the development of Big Pharma products for every real and imagined pathology therapeutic culture gets the blame Ask not where the stereotype of feckless overmedicated half paralyzed millennials comes from for it comes from their parents therapist s couches Editors Timothy Aubry and Trysh Travis bring us a dazzling array of contributors and perspectives to challenge the prevailing view of therapeutic culture as a destructive force that encourages narcissism insecurity and social isolation The collection encourages us to examine what legitimate needs therapeutic practices have served and what unexpected political and social functions they may have performed Offering both an extended history and a series of critical interventions organized around keywords like pain privacy and narcissism this volume offers a more nuanced empirically grounded picture of therapeutic culture than the one popularized by critics Rethinking Therapeutic Culture is a timely book that will change the way we ve been taught to see the landscape of therapy and self help The Lily and the Thistle The French Tradition and the Older Literature of Scotland William Calin professor of Language Literature and Culture argues for a reconsideration of the French impact on medieval and renaissance Scottish literature Available from Amazon Books In The Lily and the Thistle William Calin argues for a reconsideration of the French impact on medieval and renaissance Scottish literature Calin proposes that much of traditional medieval and early modern Scottish culture thought to be native to Scotland or primarily from England is in fact strikingly international and European By situating Scottish works

    Original URL path: http://www.clas.ufl.edu/bookbeat/201507_bookbeat.html (2015-11-04)
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  • Bookbeat | Index | University of Florida College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
    March February January 2010 December November September August June February 2009 December November October July June May April February 2008 December November October September August July June May April March February January 2007 December November October September August June May April 2006 July December June April March February 2005 December November October August June April March February 2004 December November October August June April March February 2003 December November October August September June July April May February March 2002 December November October September August June May April March February 2001 December November October September June July April March 2000 December November September August June May October April February January 1999 December November October September August May April March February January 1998 December November October September August June May April March February January 1997 December November October August July June May April March February 1996 October CLAS Navigation About CLAS Academic Units News and Events Academic Advising Research CLAS Administration Outreach Alumni and Giving CLAS Home Search This Web Site UF Web with Google UF Phonebook CLAS Portals Alumni Faculty Staff Parents Students College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 2014 Turlington Hall P O Box 117300 Gainesville FL 32611 P 352

    Original URL path: http://www.clas.ufl.edu/bookbeat/index.html (2015-11-04)
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  • Around the College | UF College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
    land surface The rapid accumulation of sediments slows down the decomposition of carbon allowing for more preservation According to the study although fjords cover just 0 1 percent of the surface area of oceans globally they represent 11 percent of the carbon buried in marine sediments each year totaling an estimated 18 million metric tons of carbon The major sink for carbon dioxide a greenhouse gas is the global ocean but there are certain hotspots in the ocean where carbon is stored rapidly for long periods of time keeping it out of the atmosphere where it contributes to global warming This work has shown for the first time that fjords are one of the key storage locations for carbon in the global ocean News from Geological Sciences In an article published in International Innovation in October 2014 Professor Thomas S Bianchi holder of the Jon and Beverly Thompson Endowed Chair of Geological Sciences and Dr Mead Allison of Tulane University discuss their work with their research team on studies of sediments from river deltas near Alaska s Beaufort Sea They are developing a high resolution record of the climate from the Holocene into the late Pleistocene in the Arctic by looking at sediments from 2 6 million to 11 700 years ago to see how climate changed there over that time span They are considering how what happened then might relate to what s happening now and perhaps predict the future The team found the first evidence of the Colville River containing organic carbon dating back to that epoch Their findings also suggest thaw in the region is ongoing and that permafrost organic carbon from this northern Alaskan watershed is moving Taken together this data represents the first evidence for the thawing and transport of ancient permafrost Phase one of

    Original URL path: http://www.clas.ufl.edu/events/news/articles/around-the-college.html (2015-11-04)
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  • Around the College | UF College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
    a technique the researchers developed to try to understand changes in continental weathering in the past by studying lead isotopes of ancient rock fragments taken from deep sea sediment cores The technique was used to evaluate at what happened 34 million years ago when Antarctica went from being a green continent to an ice covered continent over a very short time interval The study results suggested high rates of weathering prior to the ice build up which may have contributed to the drawdown of CO2 required to make the world cold enough for the ice sheet to grow The researchers also saw evidence for weathering of carbonate rocks on Antarctica following the development of ice which may have contributed to global changes in ocean chemistry They described this as an ocean deacidification event in which more carbonate was deposited in the ocean which is essentially the reverse of modern ocean acidification April News from Anthropology News of Faculty Richard Stepp was elected president of the Society for Economic Botany SEB serves as the world s largest professional society for individuals interested in exploring human use and interaction with plants cultures and the environment The society was established in 1959 and has over 1200 members in more than 64 countries around the world News from Geological Sciences News of Faculty Professor and Chair Michael Perfit spent a week in March 2013 in the northern section of the Sultanate of Oman doing field work to study a 90 million year old piece of the ocean floor that was thrust onto the continent during the tectonic collision of Africa and Asia This exposed section of oceanic crust known as an ophiolite is one of most well exposed on Earth Perfit was invited there by Professors Adolphe Nicolas and Francoise Boudier from the Universite Montpellier in France who have been mapping the terrain for over 30 years During this trip they documented and sampled rocks formed in the crust and upper mantle that are rarely exposed in modern oceans This information will be used as part of continuing research on how magmas form and erupt at mid ocean ridges July News from Geological Sciences News of Faculty Outgoing Chair and Professor Michael Perfit was selected in July by the American Geophysical Union AGU as one of its 2013 class of Fellows Established in 1962 the Fellows program is a special tribute for those scientists who have made exceptional scientific contributions and have attained acknowledged eminence in the fields of Earth and space science Conferred on not more than 0 1 percent of all AGU members per year Perfit is one of only 62 Fellows chosen this year and the only one from the state of Florida He will be recognized during the Honors Tribute at the 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in December in San Francisco Perfit joins two other Geological Sciences faculty members chosen as Fellows by AGU in previous years Emeritus Professor Neil D Opdyke 1976 and Distinguished Professor James E T Channell 1998 Emeritus Professor Anthony Randazzo now president of Gainesville based Geohazards Inc is serving as a technical advisor to the BBC television network s science and philosophy documentary program Horizon Broadcast since 1964 Horizon covers a broad range of scientific topics during each 60 minute show A sinkhole expert Randazzo provides the show s producers with information on sinkholes which are prevalent in Great Britain and other geological events September News from Geological Sciences Professor and Chair David Foster spent two weeks in the remote Turkana District of northern Kenya in August 2013 Foster and collaborators from Melbourne University Australia are studying the formation of the Turkana Basin as a key to understanding how continents rift apart and oceans form This vast desert basin is a relatively low elevation area between the two classic segments of the East African Rift in Kenya and Ethiopia where eastern Africa is slowly pulling away from western Africa The basin includes Lake Turkana the largest desert lake in the world which stands in sharp contrast to the harsh landscape around it The geology and climate of this region played a role in the dawn of mankind and some of the earliest hominid fossils are found here Anthropologist Richard Leaky who has spent most of his life working in the area has seen dramatic pressure on the local environment from climate change and overgrazing and warns that the region is a canary for human impacts on the global environmental system The next step will be using thermochronology to analyze the past temperature history of the rocks the group collected Foster anticipates the study s results will form the basis for a larger research effort into the evolution of the Turkana Basin News from Chemistry UF receives grant to join national metabolomics consortium To help chart the course of biomedical discovery in the newest of the omics frontiers the University of Florida today launched the Southeast Center for Integrated Metabolomics with a five year 9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health An emerging field metabolomics is the study of small molecules called metabolites which result from the metabolic processes that fuel and sustain life It offers a new lens through which scientists can assess and understand the state of nutrition infection health or disease in an organism whether human animal plant or microbe Read More October News from Geological Sciences Associate Professor John Jaeger was the co chief scientist of a Summer 2013 research expedition in the Gulf of Alaska on the scientific ocean drilling vessel JOIDES Resolution as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program The expedition was considered highly successful as more than 3 kilometers of core and high resolution logging data were retrieved from five different locations along the continental margin and deep sea that had been largely unexplored in the 20th century An international team of 34 scientists representing thirteen countries and multiple scientific disciplines was assembled to study how long term global climate change particularly the onset and growth

    Original URL path: http://www.clas.ufl.edu/events/news/articles/2013around-the-college.html (2015-11-04)
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  • In The News | UF College of Liberal Arts and Sciences News
    wealth of information that has been collected that goal remains elusive This is because fault zones where earthquakes occur are complex Russo said They are composed of varied materials and have irregular surfaces Although some motion on faults occurs constantly the researchers have not yet found a consistent precursory change that heralds the onset of a big earthquake Russo said the recent major earthquake in Nepal had been expected based on an even larger magnitude quake that occurred there in 1934 He recommends a program of identification and characterization of potentially hazardous faults in urban areas From those studies site specific expected seismic shaking maps can be developed and construction codes and engineering design specifications for infrastructure enacted mitigating hazard to new and future construction For the full article go here Andrea Dutton Gainesville Sun Far flung fossils give UF researchers global warming clues January 13 2015 Geological Sciences Assistant Professor Andrea Dutton s work studying fossil corals in the Seychelles Islands for clues to sea level rise was reported in the Gainesville Sun The study published in January s Quaternary Science Review was partially funded by the National Science Foundation The Seychelles were chosen for this research because sea levels there match average global sea levels well Her research team found fossil evidence that sea levels were 20 to 30 feet higher than they are now during a warm period 125 000 years ago when many coastal areas including most of South Florida were underwater She found that the melting of the Antarctic ice sheet was the major contributor to this rise a situation that may repeat itself in the future A similar story appeared in the Independent Florida Alligator with additional stories on the topic online at SeychellesNewsAgency com Futurity org ReportingClimateScience com Phys org ScienceDaily com OMICSonline

    Original URL path: http://www.clas.ufl.edu/events/news/articles/in-the-news.html (2015-11-04)
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