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  • Abner J. Mikva | Institute of Government and Public Affairs
    Chicago Mayor Richard J Daley Daley s political machine tried to freeze Mikva and Simon out but the two persevered and eventually Mikva wrote sweeping reforms of the state criminal code as well as of its mental health facilities He moved from Springfield to Washington and became a leader in the U S House of Representatives in key committees Nevertheless he was out of Congress in 1972 after the Republican party remapped his district with the tacit approval of Chicago s mayor He returned in 1974 by winning in a largely conservative and wealthy district In 1979 President Jimmy Carter nominated Mikva for the federal appeals court in the District of Columbia a seat of judicial power second only to the Supreme Court His nomination touched off a six month lobbying campaign from an old nemesis the National Rifle Association and he barely made it out of the judiciary committee Even in Mikva s victory his conservative enemies challenged the appointment with an unsuccessful lawsuit Mikva served sixteen years on the appeals court rising to chief judge He authored more than three hundred opinions including several defending free speech as well as a strong defense of consumer rights especially in a case involving laxer standards for air bags His idealism could be quixotic at times as in his striking down of a Defense Department ban on gays in the military which was later reversed A dozen years of Republicans in the presidency prevented him for an appointment to the Supreme Court In an era when it was fashionable to bash government as unwieldy and inefficient Mika defended it against the cynics The closer we live together cheek and jowl the more we need government he said That included defending the office of the chief executive In 1994 President Clinton asked

    Original URL path: http://igpa.uillinois.edu/ethics/person/abner-j-mikva (2016-02-17)
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  • Arthur S. Flemming | Institute of Government and Public Affairs
    a stint as a reporter at the magazine that became U S News and World Report and then a law degree He was only 34 when President Roosevelt tapped him as the Republican member on the old Civil Service Commission His high standing there led to the establishment of the Arthur Flemming award a high honor for federal employees that is still given out every year Flemming also served on the Hoover Commission on reorganizing the federal bureaucracy Mr Flemming is an evangelist in the cause of good government and regards the development of qualified people to administer burgeoning public programs as a critical national problem the New York Times wrote of him in a profile in 1966 His soft spoken but out spoken demeanor helped him examine America s social ills in an unflinching and caring way In 1948 he returned to academia as president of Ohio Wesleyan he later served as head of Macalester College as well as the University of Oregon In times of crisis Flemming repeatedly returned to service to the government He was the director of the Office of Defense Mobilization during the Korean War then a leader in the Labor Department the Atomic Energy Commission and the Peace Corps While in charge of Health Education and Welfare during the Eisenhower administration he created what became the federal Office on Aging In his last years his most outspoken role would be serving as President Clinton s adviser on the elderly Older persons need a dream not just a memory he said He was a member of the U S Commission on Civil Rights from 1974 to 1981 He was fired by President Reagan after criticism of what he believed were attempts by that administration to roll back some of the civil rights victories All of

    Original URL path: http://igpa.uillinois.edu/ethics/person/arthur-s-flemming (2016-02-17)
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  • A. Ernest Fitzgerald | Institute of Government and Public Affairs
    trivial projects including a trip to Thailand where he was to study cost overruns on a bowling alley Within two weeks of his testimony he was told that his promised civil service tenure was a computer error and his department was restructured to eliminate his position It took four years and nearly a million dollars in legal fees to win reinstatement to his office Ever since Fitzgerald has continued to wage war on fraud in the military industrial complex In 1981 the Reagan administration created Standard Form 189 If federal employees refused to sign the gag order they would lose their security clearances and thus their jobs If they did sign they could be punished for security violations even for the release of unclassified information that had been retroactively reclassified as top secret Fitzgerald refused to sign and eventually triumphed over SF 189 Fitzgerald also made critical investigations into spending on the MX missile in the 1980s Investigators for U S Rep John Dingell a Democrat from Michigan had been looking into Northrop Grumman Corporation s factory in Hawthorne California Fitzgerald found that snafus in the ordering department meant that the plant had accumulated and effectively lost parts many plated with silver or gold which had been classified as secret He found that 83 boxes of the missile guidance parts had been thrown into a trash bin As a result of this successful investigation Fitzgerald was dismissed as liaison to Dingell s committee by an Air Force general Fitzgerald also looked into Pentagon waste in a story that made headlines in 1988 Taxpayers were shocked to hear of 200 hammers coffee posts at 7 622 and 670 passenger seat armrests Military spec toilet seats became a national joke But Fitzgerald warned that the wastefulness of the military industrial complex had

    Original URL path: http://igpa.uillinois.edu/ethics/person/ernest-fitzgerald (2016-02-17)
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  • Archibald Cox | Institute of Government and Public Affairs
    four year leave beginning in 1961 to join the Kennedy administration as solicitor general At a time when civil rights protesters were routinely chased with dogs and clubbed he became JFK s point man on pursuing legal remedies to injustice often appearing before the Supreme Court Among the cases he was involved in were Baker vs Carr which set standards for reapportionment Heart of Atlanta which broke ground on public accommodations for all South Carolina vs Katzenbach which upheld the Voting Rights Act and Buckley vs Valeo which reformed campaign financing In May 1973 Watergate was still viewed by many as merely a third rate burglary Attorney General Elliott Richardson a former law student of his appointed him to the thankless job of special Watergate prosecutor When the Senate investigation revealed the existence of audio tapes ordered by President Nixon Special Prosecutor Cox subpoenaed them from his employer After two appeals of the subpoenas were turned down the president offered to give the Senate and Cox written summaries of what was on the tapes Cox turned down the deal Nixon then ordered Richardson to fire him But the attorney general refused to fire his former professor and so did Assistant Attorney General William Ruckelshaus Nixon then turned to the solicitor general future Supreme Court candidate Robert Bork who did carry out the order The event became known as the Saturday Night Massacre Nixon would resign less than a year later Professor Cox whose great grandfather William Maxwell Evarts defended President Andrew Johnson during impeachment proceedings in 1868 will be remembered for his uncompromising defense of the law against a chief executive His status as a liberal hero was also ironic in that the New Englander had a reputation as a legal conservative including harsh criticism of the Roe vs Wade

    Original URL path: http://igpa.uillinois.edu/ethics/person/archibald-cox (2016-02-17)
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  • Michael J. Mansfield | Institute of Government and Public Affairs
    served two more presidents Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan as the highly respected ambassador to Japan An eighth grade dropout his first experiences in Asia were as part of a military career that included service in the Navy the Army and the Marines Senator Mansfield s life did not begin grandly He was born in New York City the son of poor Irish immigrants His mother died when he was three his father a hotel porter sent him and his siblings to live with relatives in Great Falls Montana After his time in the service Senator Mansfield returned to Montana as a working man shoveling copper ore in the mines When he met a Butte college student Maureen Hayes she persuaded him to resume his studies He earned a high school degree through correspondence school and then entered what would become the University of Montana where eventually he would become a professor teaching Asian and Latin American history And he would remain married to Maureen for the 68 years until his death Politics and statesmanship were not far behind as the U S entered World War II The university granted Senator Mansfield a leave of absence when he was elected to Congress in 1942 A decade later he found a more lasting home in the Senate Despite the power he attained as majority leader he always made time for his adopted state sometimes keeping cabinet heads waiting in outer offices while he talked politics and Montana over coffee with a constituent As a senator Mansfield sought to do what was right rather than was expedient or popular Many in his party were alienated by his early support of the Civil Rights movement and later criticism of the war in Vietnam He held the Senate together in crisis first with the

    Original URL path: http://igpa.uillinois.edu/ethics/person/michael-j-mansfield (2016-02-17)
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  • Edgar Fellows Program -- FAQ | Institute of Government and Public Affairs
    and from Urbana Champaign Edgar Fellows will participate in the intensive five day executive leadership training program scheduled on July 31 to August 4 2016 on the campus of the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Why participate Edgar Fellows have the potential to help lead Illinois in the crucial decades ahead As part of this initiative they learn about leadership skills strategies and expectations through interactive sessions designed to inform and inspire Among their teachers are former Governor Jim Edgar and others who have excelled in the public arena as well as researchers and scholars In addition to the executive leadership training program Fellows learn as much from each other as they do through the formal classes Fellows have opportunities to continue their education through social networking and peer mentoring Fellows also are invited to join sessions throughout the year designed to brief them on crucial policy issues Who should be nominated for an Edgar Fellowship Residents of Illinois who have demonstrated the desire and capability to make a positive difference in their communities and the state are eligible We are seeking a group from the public civic non profit and private sectors that reflects the great diversity of our state Candidates must be able to work well with the other class participants in an intensive five day training program which they are required to attend The initiative generally targets emerging leaders under the age of 40 but there is no rigid age requirement What are the features of an Edgar Fellows class As many as 40 up and comers are selected annually to become Edgar Fellows They include leaders from state and local government community groups civic organizations and the private sector Each class includes Fellows from Chicago the suburbs and downstate Illinois and reflects the gender racial

    Original URL path: http://igpa.uillinois.edu/content/edgar-fellows-program-faq (2016-02-17)
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  • More about NEW Leadership Illinois | Institute of Government and Public Affairs
    gaining new leadership skills including how to negotiate for a desired outcome communicate effectively work in diverse environments and handle ethical dilemmas The week includes a policy theme represented by a contemporary legislative proposal in Illinois Participants are given informative materials that explain the policy and the political environment and interact with policy experts from the University of Illinois and elsewhere The goal is not only to understand one particular policy problem but to gain important skills in effectively using expert information to make a persuasive argument Students learn first hand what it means to serve in public office Women leaders including current and former legislators other elected and appointed officials lobbyists and political campaign staff serve as mentors in the program speaking in keynotes panels and roundtable discussions Students also see policy in action by visiting government offices during the week Several women leaders live in the residence halls with the students participating in the full week s events and providing numerous opportunities for informal conversations with students The program is structured for active learning Activities throughout the sessions allow students to engage with the material and with the faculty and speakers in a fun and collegial atmosphere This culminates in a group policy analysis project in which students practice their new skills and present their findings in a mock legislative committee hearing NEW Leadership TM Illinois is a joint initiative of the Institute of Government and Public Affairs at University of Illinois IGPA and the Conference of Women Legislators of the Illinois General Assembly COWL NEW Leadership TM Illinois has been developed in partnership with the NEW Leadership Development Network established by the Center for American Women in Politics a unit of the Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers the State University of New Jersey IGPA faculty and

    Original URL path: http://igpa.uillinois.edu/public-engagement/new-leadership/programs (2016-02-17)
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  • The 2016 Application Process | Institute of Government and Public Affairs
    Edgar Fellows Program NEW Leadership Illinois IGPA State Summit Family Impact Seminars 2015 Seminar 2014 Seminar 2013 Seminar 2012 Seminar 2011 Seminar 2010 Seminar 2009 Seminar Study Centers Office of Public Leadership Regional Economics Applications Laboratory The 2016 Application Process The application deadline for the 2016 program is March 7 2016 The 2016 NEW Leadership Illinois program will be held in Chicago June 6 10 Applicants must have rising junior or rising senior standing at the university level or recent graduate status winter 2015 or spring 2016 graduation date State private and community college students may apply Community college students must have completed sophomore year and be applying to a four year school for the 2016 2017 academic year Applicants must attend a university in the state and or have Illinois residency For questions about requirements please contact newl uillinois edu To apply please do the following 1 Fill out the online application here 2 Send your official transcript to NEW Leadership Illinois 1007 W Nevada St Urbana IL 61801 3 Send your updated resume to newl uillinois edu with the subject line LAST NAME Resume 4 Send one letter of recommendation to newl uillinois edu or NEW Leadership Illinois

    Original URL path: http://igpa.uillinois.edu/public-engagement/new-leadership/apply (2016-02-17)
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