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  • The 2011 Family Impact Seminar | Institute of Government and Public Affairs
    play is an integral part of cognitive emotional and social development When children are playing Hirsh Pasek said they are building their skills in The 6Cs collaboration communication critical thinking content confidence and creative innovation Watch an edited version of Ms Hirsh Pasek s presentation Click here to view the video on YouTube Hirsh Pasek argued As we enter the knowledge age integrating information and innovation is key which requires much more than simply memorizing facts and words It requires creative critical thinking skills in collaborative environments Laying the foundation for this type of thinking begins in the earliest stages of life Time for play in classrooms has declined significantly in the past ten years This time is being replaced by test preparation Our society confuses learning with memorization and test scores with success This does not prepare children to meet the challenges of the 21st century Why has this occurred Hirsh Pasek argued that we are misled by exaggerated science societal forces and marketing ploys Research has shown that playful learning trumps all other pedagogies Students who are engaged in guided play at an early age consistently perform better as they advance through the school system There is a huge gap between what we know in the science and what we do in policy It is time for the U S to focus time in classrooms on playful learning Illinois can be a leader in putting the nation s schools on the right track State Representative Roger Eddy addressed the participants after a short break He discussed the importance of prioritizing education despite a difficult budget situation that will force cuts to many state funded services A panel of experts discussed strategies at the state policy level for shifting the lens to develop curricula centered on playful learning Watch

    Original URL path: http://igpa.uillinois.edu/content/2011-family-impact-seminar (2016-02-17)
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  • 2010 Family Impact Seminar: Illinois Social and Emotional Learning Standards | Institute of Government and Public Affairs
    of Social and Emotional Learning Historical and Contemporary Perspectives Implementation of Illinois Social and Emotional Learning Standards Continuing Illinois Investment in Social and Emotional Learning Part 1 The Importance of Social and Emotional Learning Historical and Contemporary Perspectives Welcome David Kohn executive director Union League Club of Chicago Rachel A Gordon Chair Illinois Family Impact Seminar and Associate Professor Institute of Government and Public Affairs Panelists Roger P Weissberg President Collaborative for Academic Social and Emotional Learning CASEL and LAS Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Education University of Illinois at Chicago Barbara Shaw Chair Illinois Children s Mental Health Partnership and Director Illinois Violence Prevention Authority Christopher Koch Superintendent Illinois State Board of Education Part 2 Implementation of Illinois Social and Emotional Learning Standards Panelists Caryn Curry SEL Project Coordinator Illinois Children s Mental Health Partnership Mary Tavegia Principal Cossitt Elementary School La Grange IL Peter Mulhall Director Center for Prevention Research and Development Institute of Government and Public Affairs Part 3 Continuing Illinois Investment in Social and Emotional Learning Panelists Gaylord Gieseke Vice President Voices for Illinois Children Dawn Melchiorre Policy Director Voices for Illinois Children Additional Material PowerPoint Presentations Roger Weissberg Exciting Advances in More Information and Past

    Original URL path: http://igpa.uillinois.edu/PE/fis2010 (2016-02-17)
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  • 2009 Family Impact Seminar: Helping Illinois' Families In Economic Crisis | Institute of Government and Public Affairs
    Center for Historical Studies Princeton the Russell Sage Foundation and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars he also has held a fellowship from the Open Society Institute Professor Katz is a fellow of the National Academy of Education National Academy of Social Insurance and the Society of American Historians In 1999 he received a Senior Scholar Award a lifetime achievement award from the Spencer Foundation From 1989 1995 he served as archivist to the Social Science Research Council s Committee for Research on the Urban Underclass and in 1992 was a member of the Task Force to Reduce Welfare Dependency appointed by the Governor of Pennsylvania From 1991 1995 Professor Katz was Chair of the History Department at the University of Pennsylvania from 1983 1996 he directed or co directed the University s undergraduate Urban Studies Program in 1994 he founded the graduate certificate program in Urban Studies which he co directs He is a past president of the History of Education Society and of the Urban History Association In 2007 he was given the Provost s Award for Distinguished Graduate Student Teaching and Mentoring Sarah Fass researches child poverty and policies that promote the economic security and well being of low income families including federal and state family leave policies at the National Center for Children in Poverty at Columbia University s Mailman School of Public Health She plays a leading role in NCCP s Making Work Supports Work project which analyzes federal and state work support policies such as tax credits public health insurance and child care subsidies and explores policy reforms the project builds on NCCP s innovative policy analysis tools the Family Resource Simulator and the Basic Needs Budget Calculator Ms Fass has also written about cross state policy variation and measures of poverty and income adequacy Ms Fass holds a Master of Public Health degree from the Mailman School and a Bachelor s degree in American Studies and French from Georgetown University View Ms Fass s PowerPoint presentation PDF Elizabeth Lower Basch is a Senior Policy Analyst with the workforce team at the Center for Law and Social Policy CLASP Her areas of focus include welfare policy job quality and supports for low income working families Prior to joining CLASP Ms Lower Basch worked from 1996 to 2006 for the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at the U S Department of Health and Human Services Ms Lower Basch received a Masters of Public Policy from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University CLASP is a national nonprofit that works to improve the lives of low income people CLASP s mission is to improve the economic security educational and workforce prospects and family stability of low income parents children and youth and to secure equal justice for all View Ms Lower Basch s PowerPoint presentation PDF Additional Material Making Work Supports Work project description NCCP Supporting Work in Illinois The Challenges Ahead NCCP Staying Afloat in Tough Times What State

    Original URL path: http://igpa.uillinois.edu/public-engagement/fis/2009-family-impact-seminar (2016-02-17)
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  • Study Centers | Institute of Government and Public Affairs
    Ethics Award Edgar Fellows Program NEW Leadership Illinois IGPA State Summit Family Impact Seminars 2015 Seminar 2014 Seminar 2013 Seminar 2012 Seminar 2011 Seminar 2010 Seminar 2009 Seminar Study Centers Office of Public Leadership Regional Economics Applications Laboratory Study Centers IGPA is home to the Office of Public Leadership the Regional Economics Applications Laboratory REAL These centers provide specialized research training and public engagement opportunities in the areas of leadership

    Original URL path: http://igpa.uillinois.edu/centers (2016-02-17)
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  • Welcome to the Office of Public Leadership | Institute of Government and Public Affairs
    our mission We are the Office of Public Leadership OPL OPL is a specialized study center of the University of Illinois Institute of Government and Public Affairs IGPA We have a long history of producing high quality leadership programs for elected and appointed state and local leaders and staff Since 1993 hundreds of our leadership program participants have become UI alums OPL s participants learn from our cadre of extraordinary University of Illinois and IGPA faculty and expert practitioners We design leadership programs to bridge the gap between the academic world of research and complex policy analysis and the practical world of running government and making policy decisions in real time OPL builds opportunities peer to peer mentoring information exchanges and sharing and networking for participants whose goal it is to serve the public as leaders Our current leadership education and development programs are LEAD Illinois UCCI Leadership Academy and the Municipal Clerks of Illinois Institute and Academy OPL leadership program graduates are UI alums who continue to exchange ideas about governing and leadership by joining other alums year round in the Leadership Forum Leadership Book Dialogues Learning Laboratory and LEAD Illinois Blog Office of Public Leadership Welcome Edgar Fellows

    Original URL path: http://igpa.uillinois.edu/opl (2016-02-17)
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  • Revenue, spending at midpoint of FY16 | Institute of Government and Public Affairs
    brief uses data from the Illinois Office of the Comptroller on spending and revenue as of December 31 2015 to provide a detailed accounting of the budget picture at the mid point of FY16 The data show that as of mid FY16 Illinois had revenue of only about 30 billion or 46 percent of FY15 revenue Based on this data and other analyses the researchers project final revenue for FY16 of about 63 7 billion a decline of 1 9 billion from FY15 The scheduled phase out of the temporary income tax rate increase has left the state with significantly less money this fiscal year That s a problem in itself said David Merriman co director of the Fiscal Futures Project But the autopilot spending caused by the budget stalemate means that the state is allocating expenditures for some categories at rates similar to FY15 while others are receiving almost nothing The report provides a data table that details allocations to various departments and agencies It compares the amount allocated by mid FY16 to total spending in each category in FY15 to provide a ratio expressed as a percentage of FY15 spending For example spending for K 12 education funded by an appropriations bill is consistent with last year at 3 99 billion or 45 percent of FY15 spending The ratios range from a low of less than 1 percent state employee health care to a high of 55 percent Environmental Protection Agency Other areas with particularly low mid FY16 rates of expenditures include university education 1 percent the Illinois Community College Board 1 percent and the Capital Development Board 3 percent Overall the state s lack of a budget will only add to the imbalance between revenue and spending resulting in a bad deficit made worse The state had

    Original URL path: http://igpa.uillinois.edu/node/2291 (2016-02-17)
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  • Illinois Still in the "Penalty Box' | Institute of Government and Public Affairs
    IGPA The analysis also indicates that this financial condition penalty could more than double in future years if the crisis continues And when future capital needs are included the estimated penalty could grow to more than 400 million per year according to the study This analysis aims to quantify the costs of Illinois deteriorating fiscal health in the bond markets what we are calling a financial condition penalty said Martin J Luby an IGPA visiting scholar who completed the analysis Analyzing the relative bond prices the state receives in the financial markets over time allows us to assess how investors perceive the state s changing financial condition Luby compared prices received from the state s Jan 14 bond sale with prices received for state bonds sold in 2006 when Illinois credit ratings were far better controlling for other complicating factors The January sale brought actual prices that ranged between 98 percent and 114 percent of par value Using the counterfactual conditions from 2006 the prices would have ranged between 104 percent and 127 percent of the par amount Based on these individual bond prices the total dollars the state received for the 2016 bonds was just over 514 9 million nearly 53 millionless than it would have received had the bonds carried the relative prices of 10 years ago according to Luby s analysis This analysis is part of IGPA s continuing Fiscal Futures Project Putting a dollar amount on the impact of the state s financial condition hopefully helps policymakers and the public better understand the costs of the state s lack of action in improving its fiscal health said Luby Recent analyses indicate that Illinois will need to issue much more annual debt than in the past to address its growing infrastructure needs as much as 4 billion

    Original URL path: http://igpa.uillinois.edu/node/2279 (2016-02-17)
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  • Improving Budget Practices in Illinois | Institute of Government and Public Affairs
    Illinois Author s Richard F Dye David F Merriman New research finds that Illinois does not follow basic principles of sound budgeting recommended by fiscal experts and suggests ways that Illinois and other states can reform practices to avoid fiscal crises in the future Two reports from a team of researchers from IGPA and the Volcker Alliance demonstrate ways states can improve transparency and accountability A working paper released by the Volcker Alliance a nonpartisan organization established in 2013 by former Federal Reserve Board Chairman Paul A Volcker sets forth six basic principles of sound budgeting for states and provides ten recommendations for improved budgetary transparency including disclosure of 1 the use of one time revenue sources to cover recurring expenditures 2 deferrals of spending and 3 underfunding of infrastructure maintenance and public worker retirement obligations Read the Volcker Alliance s paper here PDF In order for elected officials to be able to govern effectively and citizens to be accurately informed about policy choices states have to provide comprehensible information about their budgets said William Glasgall Director of State and Local Programs for the Volcker Alliance This paper highlights some existing best practices and demonstrates the direction states need to be heading Researchers from IGPA s Fiscal Futures Project found that Illinois budget practices are badly in need of reform They assert The buy now pay later content choices of the past were facilitated even disguised by then existing procedural and reporting practices Reform of these practices would improve budget transparency and accountability and help prevent Illinois from getting into such dire fiscal straits in the future The IGPA team suggests five concrete steps that Illinois can take today 1 Refine and expand multiyear budget planning 2 Require meaningful fiscal notes to accompany legislation 3 Modify cash only budget reporting

    Original URL path: http://igpa.uillinois.edu/node/2268 (2016-02-17)
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