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  • Fieldwork Safety Guidelines – IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering – University of Iowa
    accommodations and during travel to and from the site arrangements of appropriate transportation to at and returning from the location of the fieldwork vehicles must be operated in a manner consistent with Standard Operating Procedures SOPs for university vehicles Personnel should ask the PI for a briefing on the procedures before operating an unfamiliar vehicle for the first time the tasks and responsibilities assigned to each participant must be clearly communicated prior to and during each field excursion knowledge of all health and safety standards and requirements applicable to the jurisdiction in which the fieldwork is being conducted provision of appropriate information and training regarding the risks associated with fieldwork activities materials equipment and environment and appropriate control measures for dealing with them provision of appropriate information and training for responding to and reporting of accidents involving injuries damage to property and equipment and spills leaks or release of hazardous materials recognition of the right and responsibility of an individual to exercise personal judgment in acting to avoid harm in situations of apparent danger in this regard students should be informed of the general nature requirements and location of their fieldwork and availability of procedures for contacting the University to obtain assistance in an emergency 4 0 REFUSAL OF UNSAFE WORK Any member of a fieldwork team may refuse at any time to participate in any activity that they feel may endanger their health and safety or that of another person 5 0 SOLITARY FIELDWORK Working alone is strongly discouraged particularly when remote or hazardous locations high risk activities or other unusual conditions are involved In situations where solitary work is deemed necessary and unavoidable a stringent code of practice must be established to address worker competency procedures for regular reporting emergency procedures and other precautions and procedures appropriate to the type of activities involved The field member must ensure that someone knows where he she is and when he she is expected to return 6 0 GENERAL GUIDELINES Before fieldwork is conducted the PI should develop standard operating procedures SOPs specific to their fieldwork The SOPs should include at a minimum information provided in sections 6 1 6 2 and 8 0 6 1 Preparation Before Individual s Leave One of the most important phases of a fieldwork experience is planning and preparation before you leave Here are some suggestions Complete and submit a Fieldwork Plan required Learn about potentially hazardous plants animals terrain and weather conditions in the area where fieldwork is being conducted Take a CPR First Aid class Assemble safety equipment and other provisions and check everything before you leave These include First aid kit and first aid manual Medications taken on a regular basis Allergy treatments as needed Sunscreen and hat Personal protective equipment PPE such as safety glasses goggles gloves hard hat work boots etc Vehicle emergency kit Flashlight Flares Two way radio if you will be working in an isolated or dangerous area and or cellular phone as appropriate Whenever possible fieldwork activities should be done in teams of at least two people Ask your health insurance provider about how your coverage applies to medical treatment in the fieldwork locale should that become necessary Find out where to go for emergency care Obtain authorization for access to state federal and or private lands Obtain permits for any sample collection from respective agencies i e DLNR NFWS etc 6 2 Medical Care and First Aid IIHR maintains a first aid kit in each of its cars and trucks A kit may also be checked out from the shop when using other vehicles for field work When not working near the vehicle a field crew member should carry a first aid kit When conducting field work in remote areas around particularly dangerous or extreme landforms or under other special circumstances the PI may require one or more field crew members to receive first aid certification The PI may also work with IIHR shop personnel to prepare an appropriate survival kit to meet the circumstances of the situation 6 3 Travel on Foot Wear proper safety gear Always carry a first aid kit radio or cell phone if coverage is available and water Be sure that equipment and supplies are carried in a manner consistent with safe travel over rough terrain Backpacks should be in good repair and fit properly DO NOT OVER ESTIMATE YOUR LOAD CAPACITY Always be aware of what s around you on ground and overhead Be conscious of surroundings when disoriented familiar objects can set you on track Carry a compass and an area field map showing locations of pertinent transect roads and trails and other landmarks especially in unfamiliar surround ings and or when fog rain or darkness can set in Always be sure someone in the laboratory knows where you are and when you are expected to return Never overextend your capabilities Be sure permission is granted before entering private property Report accidents immediately to your supervisor Use common sense and If you do get lost or become disoriented STAY WHERE YOU ARE You may be overcome by panic Sit down and quietly organize your thoughts on where you are A few moments of recollection may clarify your situation If not find a comfortable place to rest Use your whistle or other means to attract the attention of anyone around you Do not try to leave the area if there are no signs of where to go Do not travel at night You can sometimes assist a helicopter search by starting a smoky fire but be extremely careful not to set the surrounding vegetation on fire 6 4 Other Transportation 6 4 1 Use of Vehicles Only licensed and appropriately trained drivers should be in charge of field vehicles This can be ensured by only allowing personnel to drive vehicles for field work if they have been cleared to drive a UI vehicle See Greg Wagner or Laura Myers Using private vehicles for field work is highly discouraged and the vehicle will not be covered by UI insurance vehicle owners should check with their private insurance provider Vehicles used for fieldwork should be well maintained according to the manufacturer s service specifications and equipped with adequate spare parts and tools according to the area and length of trip Care must be taken when loading vehicles to maintain as low a center of gravity as possible and to secure items adequately in the cabin Vehicles must be driven with caution and attention to prevailing road and weather conditions The vehicle should be selected for the type of terrain likely to be encountered and drivers should be familiar with the vehicle before departure Drivers intending to use four wheel drive 4WD vehicles should be able to demonstrate experience in driving such vehicles Drivers should be familiar with routine maintenance procedures such as checking oil water tire pressure coolant and battery and changing tires Drivers should also be aware of the fuel capacity and range of the vehicle Prior to setting out on the trip the driver should check the vehicle to ensure it has been adequately maintained and has all necessary tools spare parts and special equipment for the trip A check should be made that luggage and other equipment are secure Rest stops and fuel stops should be used to check the vehicle and that luggage and equipment remain secure Driving times and distances should be planned to prevent fatigue Drivers should take periodic breaks after driving for a few hours During the break some light physical activity such as walking should be incorporated Night driving is more hazardous because of reduced visibility and fatigue and should be minimized Drivers should always heed applicable speed limits and road rules including those pertaining to consumption of alcohol Safe speeds depend upon the road and weather conditions experience of the driver time of day alertness of the driver and the vehicle itself Unfamiliarity with the road or conditions and the presence of nocturnal animals contribute to driving hazards 6 4 2 Use of Boats See IIHR s Boat Safety Plan available here 6 5 Roadside Parking and or Roadside Fieldwork It is often necessary to park on the side of the road when conducing fieldwork and often to actually work along or near the side of the road The minimum requirement for roadside parking or fieldwork is for all field crew members to wear reflective safety vests at all times Traffic cones may also be placed behind the vehicle and a strobe light placed on the vehicle Vests cones and strobe lights may be checked out from the IIHR shop Work vehicles in or near traffic areas should be equipped with flashing lights such as a yellow rotating beacon or strobe light The basic layout of a roadside work area are shown in figure UT 1 below 6 6 SCUBA Diving Before diving the PI must consider appropriate training and safety procedures such as those used by the UI Scuba Club http www diversalertnetwork org training onlineseminars 6 7 Use of Pesticides Herbicides Other Chemicals If your field work requires you to use pesticides you must either work under the supervision of a person who has a certificate for pesticide application or have a current certificate yourself You must abide by the instructions on the pesticide label You must wear the appropriate safety equipment and clothing at all times and are responsible for maintaining your equipment and clothing Know the requirements of the University s Chemical Hygiene Plan http ehs research uiowa edu chemical hygiene plan and or Hazard Communication Program http ehs research uiowa edu hazard communication as it applies to your work contact UI EHS Chemical Hygiene Officer LuAnn Hiratzka at 335 7964 or Industrial Hygienist Robin Linderboom at 335 9554 for these requirements In case of exposure to harmful chemicals flush the area with water or follow other appropriate action s to minimize harmful reactions seek medical attention and notify your supervisor immediately 6 8 Working In Water 6 8 1 Coastal and Estuarine Work When planning coastal and estuarine work information about tides currents weather and other factors affecting safety must be considered Work on rock platforms can be particularly hazardous and adequate precautions must be taken to prevent anyone from being swept from rocks or injured by unexpected waves Ensure that appropriate clothing including footwear is worn by all personnel 6 8 2 Streams When working in streams always be aware of the weather conditions especially when heavy rains are forecast Other precautions to consider are Wear footwear appropriate for the tasks e g rubber boots tabis i e those designed for wading Do not jump from rock to rock Always ensure that your footing is safe If after working in a stream or in some way associated with water you come down with flu like symptoms that persist consult your physician and inform him her that you may have been exposed to leptospirosis If you have a break in your skin that could be exposed to water let your supervisor know so that protective measures can be taken or you can be assigned to other duties Never drink untreated water from streams or any source other than a municipal supply If you suffer from diarrhea and have a hydrogen sulphide taste in your mouth after belching consult your doctor and inform him her of the possibility or your having Giardiasis or amoebic dysentery or other waterborne diseases If your doctor confirms that you are suffering any such disease you must notify your supervisor immediately You may not work in the field until your doctor has confirmed that you are free of the disease 6 10 Working on State or Federal Lands If you are working in a national park wildlife refuge or state forest reserve and there is an emergency e g volcanic eruption wildfire injury etc you may be requested to participate in emergency operations Obey the incident commander or other responsible official Participation in such emergencies is optional but you are encouraged to support the emergency operation During the period of the emergency you will be covered under the emergency regulations 6 11 Working With or Around Animals Field work crews should avoid working with live or near dead animals as rodents rat and mice cats and other animals are known to carry a variety of diseases If you must handle live animals use protective bite proof gloves with disposable gloves underneath and take precautions to prevent animal fluids from hitting your eyes nose and mouth Any contact with fluids on skin should be washed off with an antibacterial soap Seek medical treatment immediately if there is a possibility of exposure to an animal or parasite borne disease e g rabies Lyme disease etc Check with the UH EHSO Biological Safety Office and the IACUC Institutional Animal Care Use Committee for additional approval and guidance when anticipating working with or around animals 6 12 Pests A number of pests may be encountered in fieldwork Follow these general guidelines to prevent injury and illness Keep garbage in rodent proof containers and stored away from your campsite or work area Thoroughly shake all clothing and bedding before use Do not camp or sleep near obvious animal nests or burrows Carefully look for pests before placing your hands feet or body in areas where pests live or hide e g wood piles crevices etc Avoid contact with sick or dead animals Wear clothes made of tightly woven materials and tuck pants into boots Wear insect repellent Minimize the amount of time you use lights after dark in your camp or work site as they may attract pests and animals Use netting to keep pests away from food and people Carry a first aid manual and kit with you on any excursion so you can treat bites or stings If the pest is poisonous or if the bite does not appear to heal properly seek medical attention immediately Familiarize yourself with common pests and symptoms of animal or parasite borne diseases in the area Be aware of the appearance and habitat of pests likely to be found If you are bitten by a deer tick watch for symptoms of Lyme disease which may appear days or weeks after infection or other signs of illness Seek medical attention 6 13 Other Environmental Hazards In addition to pests other fieldwork exposures can be hazardous Poisonous Plants plants like poison ivy may contain a potent allergen that can cause a reaction anywhere from several hours to two weeks after exposure To prevent exposure learn to recognize and avoid the plant and wear clothing such as long pants and long sleeved shirts If you come in contact with these plants wash clothes and skin with soap and water as soon as possible check out http www extension iastate edu publications pm773 pdf Impure Water A variety of potentially harmful organisms and pathogens can live in natural water sources such as streams lakes and rivers Never drink straight from a natural source If you must use these sources treat the water first by using water purification tablets boiling it for three minutes or using a special purification filter available from sporting goods stores Exposure to the Elements Sunburn is a common and easily preventable hazard To prevent sunburn cover exposed skin and liberally apply sunblock creams Wearing a long sleeved shirt and hat will also provide protection from the sun Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke To prevent heat exhaustion drink plenty of liquids electrolyte replacers and take frequent rest breaks Heat exhaustion symptoms include fatigue excessive thirst heavy sweating and cool and clammy skin and are similar to shock symptoms Cool the victim treat for shock and give water or electrolyte replacement slowly but steadily if the victim can drink If left untreated the victim can suffer heat stroke which is very serious and possibly fatal Cool the victim at once replenish fluids and seek medical attention immediately Excessive Cold On any trip even a one day excursion where sudden changes in weather can occur adequate clothing must be worn or carried Prolonged exposure to excessive cold can lead to hypothermia symptoms include shivering numbness slurred speech and excessive fatigue Wear several layers of clothing to allow adjustments to differing levels of physical activity Avoid getting damp from perspiration 7 0 EQUIPMENT AND COMMUNICATIONS 7 1 Equipment Safety equipment used in the field should be inspected and or tested prior to the trip to ensure that it is in good operating condition with fully charges batteries sufficient fuel and all appropriate parts 7 2 Special Safety Equipment Depending on the type of work the area and the likely weather conditions special safety equipment may be required This will include personal protective equipment PPE such as coveralls proper footwear or boots sunglasses safety goggles insect repellent sunscreen hats wetsuit gloves respirators or personal flotation devices Other suggested items include water canteen matches whistles and flashlights Ensure that the equipment and material you need has been carefully thought about is available to the field crew and that everyone involved knows how to use it If anyone in the group has specific medical conditions requiring medication or has allergies to anything that may occur during the work make sure someone else knows about it and is familiar with appropriate treatment for the condition 7 3 Communications Equipment Training and licensing are required for use of certain types of radios Where these are the main form of communication all members of the fieldwork group must be trained and licensed in their use If cellular phones are used everyone must know how to use them properly and must have access to the relevant contact numbers Battery power for communication equipment should be sufficient to last beyond the expected duration of the fieldwork 7 4 Contacts and Continuity of Contact No trip should take place without there being properly informed and competent designated contacts both within the fieldwork team and

    Original URL path: http://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/research/safety-information/fieldwork-safety-guidelines/ (2015-11-11)
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  • Boat Safety Guidelines – IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering – University of Iowa
    lines stow them and carefully maneuver away from the dock When fueling a boat equipped with permanent tanks carefully fill the tanks while holding a rag or absorbent material under the vent When the tank is full replace the cap on the filler tube and clean up any spilled fuel and oil Dispose of oily rags on the fuel dock Untie the dock lines stow them and carefully maneuver away from the dock Anchoring Anchoring the boat may be necessary for certain IIHR work activities such as bottom sediment coring bottom sediment sampling placing of sensors and water quality sampling The boat operator should assure that adequate anchor and associated tackle is kept onboard when it is needed The appropriate tackle must include an anchor of sufficient size and design to hold the watercraft in the bottom conditions present in the waterways commonly frequented a length of anchor chain at least equal to the length of the boat to be anchored and nylon anchor line of sufficient length the equal to three to five times the water depth commonly encountered In addition when working in shallow water less than fvie feet deep the use of a spud pole attached to the boat that is driven into the bottom sediment can help stabilize the boat during working conditions In general during bottom sediment coring operations the boat typically a pontoon boat will need to use a two or three point anchoring system for maximum stability Sampling Suspended sediment and water quality sampling may incorporate heavy samplers suspended overboard and moved through the entire depth of flow There is a chance this equipment could become entangled with objects or the streambed Either of these situations demands careful attention on the part of both the boat operator and sampling crew and should be avoided if possible In the event the overboard equipment is fouled the boat crew must work as a team to free the equipment or cut it free to save the boat and crew Sampling for bedload and bed material presents other safety concerns Bedload sampling from a boat is least hazardous when the boat is moved into the desired sampling location prior to placing the sampler in the flow Once the sampler is lowered into the flow it should be placed on the bottom as quickly as possible The boat operator should then hover above the sampler s position for the desired sampling period When the sampling period is complete the sampling crew should quickly snatch the sampler off of the bottom and raise it through the water column as the boat operator allows the boat to drift and minimize the drag on the sampler in transit Bed material sampling is another matter Physically scooping dredging or coring material from the streambed puts stress on the watercraft Caution must be exercised on the part of the boat operator and sampling crew to avoid exceeding the design limits of the boat The safest technique for dredging or scooping a bed material sample from a small boat in moving water is to lower the sampling equipment from the bow to the streambed while keeping the bow upstream To dredge a sample let the boat drift or slowly power downstream in reverse dragging the dredge along the bottom Then quickly lift the sample and sampler to the surface In the case of a scoop type sampler lower it until it firmly impacts the streambed then immediately retrieve the sampler and sample after the impact triggers the spring loaded scoop Bed material coring should be done from a pontoon boat or large stable platform Except in the case of coring devices that only penetrate the streambed to depths of several inches highly buoyant floating platforms are necessary to work against the suction forces to break the coring unit free of the bottom for retrieval Geophysical and Discharge Measurements Generally waterborne geophysical or discharge measurements involve remote sensing techniques that look through the water column in some manner Equipment is placed onboard with only the various transducers exposed to the potential hazards overboard Overboard configurations may include equipment along the side the boat or in the case of some geophysical equipment towed arrays at the surface at some depth in the flow or even in contact with the streambed Discharge measurements with IIHR boats using Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler ADCP measurements are by far the safest The only overboard equipment is the transducer protruding into the flow to a depth slightly below the lever of the hull This minimizes its exposure to debris entrained in the flow and greatly reduces the likelihood of safety problems Geophysical towed arrays would require a higher level of safety awareness for the boat and crew Geophysical equipment towed at some distance behind a boat can be affected by currents at its location and a careful and attentive boat operation is needed to minimize fouling on fixed obstructions Arrays at intermediate depths or in contact with the streambed are at higher risk of fouling because the boat operator has a more difficult time of knowing what the conditions are at the transducer locations Potential Safety Hazards Many potential safety hazards that can affect boat operation However three main conditions often encountered while operating a boat will be discussed weather flow conditions and structures in the water A critical part of the boat safety plan is a well informed boat operator and crew who understand these potential hazards and plan ahead Weather Slight changes in weather conditions can adversely affect a body of water in a relatively short time period If a boat and crew are in an exposed position this change could seriously jeopardize their safety A boat operator should be understand the weather patterns typical of the area in which work is to be done and be able to identify rapidly approaching frontal systems that could place the boat and crew in danger Wind Heavy wind is one of the greatest hazards to a small boat on a large body of water Wind can quickly whip the water surface into a severe chop with breaking white capped waves The greater the fetch upwind distance over water from the boat s position the worse the wind driven surface waves can be If the boat is located in a shallow area downwind from deeper water the height of the wind driven waves can be expected to increase dramatically as they enter the shallows Wind blowing in opposition to the direction of flow can create large swells and threaten the safety of boat and crew A boat operator must carefully assess wind conditions in the area upon arrival and determine if a significant hazard exists one that could be avoided on a calmer day A rule of thumb for estimating wind speed is to look for white caps which generally begin to appear at wind speeds approaching 20 miles per hour over calm water If possible working with the bow into the wind is the safest position for the boat in windy conditions However working in a river requires that the bow be held against the direction of flow If the wind opposes the current this could place the boat and crew in jeopardy as the steep wind driven swell will impact the boat s stern This situation could potentially swamp the boat if the waves steepen and begin to break over the transom Rain Aside from personal discomfort light rain does not present an extreme hazard to crews in small boats However heavy rain over long durations can constitute a significant hazard if allowed to accumulate in the bottom of the boat If the boat is transporting a load near maximum for its hull configuration the weight of accumulated rainwater could adversely affect stability or significantly reduce freeboard distance from the waterline to the gunwale Either of these could result in swamping or capsizing In addition lightning storms are common in some locations and must be considered as a serious threat to the safety of boat and crew Again it is the operator s responsibility to assess the severity of the situation and react to protect the safety of the boat and crew This action could be nothing more than pumping the excess rain water overboard on a periodic basis or it may require that the work effort be temporarily aborted until the rain or lightning dissipates to a non threatening level Heat and Cold Weather extremes range from hot temperatures and sun exposure to cold temperatures and freezing conditions Most often small work boats do not provide protection from the elements Working in the middle of a body of water almost always means complete exposure to the existing weather extremes The hazards here may be health risks as well as some potential for physical injury In the case of extreme heat and sun exposure the crew should always carry drinking water to help minimize the potential for dehydration Some form of protection from the sun is essential and will aid in reducing the potential for dehydration in addition to minimizing the harmful effects of ultraviolet rays on human skin Extreme heat combined with high wind can increase the rate of dehydration Extreme cold and freezing conditions may be more hazardous than heat In addition to the more obvious concerns about hypothermia dehydration is still a potential problem Protective clothing is essential to minimize the effects of hypothermia An accidental fall overboard could prove fatal if the victim is not properly clothed Water robs the body of heat 25 times faster than air so the immediate problem is rescuing the overboard victim Remember the 50 50 rule i e an unprotected overboard victim in water less than or equal to 50 degrees Fahrenheit has a 50 percent chance of surviving for 50 minutes In addition to these potential health risks a boat operator working in extreme cold and freezing conditions must watch for ice build up on the boat s hull Even though ice floats its mass above the waterline adds to the weight of the boat and its load If ice is allowed to accumulate above the waterline as a result of splash from the wake or spray from wind blown waves the boat can become overloaded and settle in the water to a point where an otherwise insignificant volume of water could swamp and sink the boat Restricted Visibility The most common cause of restricted visibility is fog Heavy rain and snow or in some areas blowing dust can reduce visibility in the extreme as well Being caught out on the river after dark can compromise safety Operation during periods of extreme restricted visibility is not advised particularly in areas frequented by large commercial vessel traffic When operation is essential during periods of restricted visibility standard navigation lights must be displayed Also proper horn or bell signals should be given as required by inland or international navigation rules for the size of vessel underway or anchored during periods of restricted visibility Flow Conditions Even though it is never good to become complacent when operating a boat there are flow conditions with which an operator may feel comfortable Generally this comfort zone exists when an operator is in an area frequently visited and the flow conditions are those normally experienced However extreme flow conditions diverging from the norm are can change a familiar area altogether Low flow conditions Operation may be hampered by extreme shallows and obstructions along the bottom In particular wing dams common along the Mississippi River shoreline may be only a few feet from the surface of the water Successfully traversing an area may require the use of a boat equipped with high trim If the lower end of an outboard shaft strikes the bottom or some submerged object abnormally close to the surface the boat may run aground and sustain damage A slow safe speed while looking for obstructions is needed High flow conditions These conditions may include water spilling onto the floodplain high flow velocity and turbulence and or unusually heavy debris loads in transport The debris is normally entrained in the flow when it is picked up from the stream banks or scoured from the streambed as the water surface elevation stage and flow velocity increase Operation under these conditions requires concentration and skillful boat handling Also care must be exercised if it becomes necessary to traverse areas along the stream banks where objects normally exposed at lower stages may become dangerous submerged obstructions Fast Water Fast water may be associated with seasonal high flows or flooding Some streams are characterized by high flow velocities and debris Operating a motorized boat in fast water conditions requires an understanding of the hydraulics associated with flow around in channel obstructions and an ability to recognize problem areas Often this is known as reading the river The object is to identify the clearest path so the boat can be kept in the safest position while traversing through pool and riffle sequences typical of most river reaches Experience is the best teacher here but on the job training pairing an experienced operator with a less experienced operator or advanced level operator training can improve fast water operator proficiency Also repetitive operation in the same streams allows an operator to develop the local knowledge necessary to expand his her comfort zone In general white water at the surface is an indicator of some submerged condition A continuous white water trace remaining in one area nearly always indicates a fixed submerged object i e rock log etc When white water appears to be intermittent at the surface or shifts slightly in relation to a point in the flow it is most likely the result of some hydraulic action associated with the configuration of the streambed i e standing waves etc Nearly every stream has some specific flow characteristic associated with the existing white water reaches These are generally tied to geomorphic conditions in the channel that may range from large rocks disbursed on the streambed to rock ledges protruding into the flow below the surface to sand and or gravel bars Flows around stationary rocks and ledges are relatively consistent for any given stage Once local knowledge is acquired in these flows an operator can traverse familiar river reaches with a high level of confidence Acquiring local knowledge in flows controlled by sand and gravel bars is more difficult In this case the channel may migrate in response to geomorphic changes as the bed material is scoured and redeposited with changes in the stage and flow velocity Structures Fixed structures including bridges and dams are of particular concern to operators and crews working from boats As mentioned earlier the wing dams commonly used along the shoreline of the Mississippi River for channel stabilization may be only a few feet below the water surface Boat operators should always familiarize themselves with any in channel structure that could ultimately threaten the safety of their vessel and crew Charts or maps of an area can provide valuable information related to the size and location of a structure across the channel Regulatory agencies such as the State Department of Transportation U S Army Corps of Engineers Bureau of Reclamation etc can generally provide more detailed local information Bridges Bridges may constitute major hazards to the boating public by restricting overhead clearance generating extreme turbulence in the vicinity of bridge piers in the flow or trapping debris and reducing the opening available between piers During high stages overhead clearance may be minimal for the passage of river traffic In this case if work must be done downstream of the bridge one of two courses of action are necessary to protect the safety of vessel and crew 1 find an alternate location for launching the boat below the bridge or 2 call the bridge tender and request an opening of the lift or swing span if so equipped In general try to avoid working from a boat in close proximity to and upstream of an excessively submerged bridge structure The following list of actions will help to ensure the safety of vessel and crew when working in the vicinity of bridges If it is necessary to work from a boat upstream from a bridge during high flow or anytime the structure presents a threat to safety two sources of power main engine plus auxiliary or twin engines should be onboard and running in the event the backup is immediately needed Always carry an anchor of adequate size and design securely attached to a length of chain equal to one boat length and a length of nylon line equal to three to five times the anticipated depth to stop the vessel and hold it against the flow This equipment must be ready to deploy in an instant with the end of the line attached to the boat Cutting devices adequate to clear any line that becomes fouled on the boat and threatens its safety must be at the ready These should include but are not limited to garden loppers bolt cutters cable shears and a hatchet or machete Avoid working in close proximity to bridge piers if possible If it is necessary to work close to a bridge pier approach the pier in the tail wake from downstream keeping a sharp lookout for debris caught on the pier Carefully work along the side of the pier and inside the wake or eddy line generated by its upstream face Never put the boat across the upstream face of the pier where it could become trapped by the force of the current If the pier structure includes a web wall between an upstream and downstream pier the operator must carefully assess the turbulence and potential suction created by flow being forced under the web wall before committing the vessel and crew to this potentially dangerous situation alongside the pier If the flow strikes at an angle other than parallel to the pier carefully approach from the tail wake side

    Original URL path: http://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/research/safety-information/boat-safetyfloat-plan/ (2015-11-11)
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  • Construction and Fabrication – IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering – University of Iowa
    industrial table saws routers jointer planer miter saws band saws Commercial grade airless paint and body work area Sheet metal area 48 shears brake and roller and Storage for recycling instrumentation and equipment The IESS team also has access to rapid prototyping CNC mills lathes and thermoformed plastic beds for complex geometry fabrication Another area of specialization at IIHR is the fabrication of precision instrumentation and detailed scale replicas of hydraulic structures as well as laboratory flumes IESS has constructed several large warehouse sized models including a 50x33x1 4 meter replica of the Columbia River gorge including the Wanapum and Priest Rapids dams For large construction projects as well as field activities IESS maintains a broad assortment of mechanized equipment including skid loaders dump trailers tilt bed trucks and an industrial forklifts Contact us today about your construction and fabrication needs Tags IIHR mechanical shop UI facilities UI research Last modified on June 29th 2015 Posted on July 17th 2014 Home About Greetings from the Director Fact Page IIHR at a Glance Where is IIHR Communications History IIHR s Historical Studies History Resources Hans Albert Einstein His Life as a Pioneering Engineer Sustainability at IIHR Evolving with the Times Intellectual Connections Worldwide IIHR Alumni Worldwide Archives Films by Hunter Rouse Employment Contact IIHR Webcam Education Graduate Program Admission Assistantships and Fellowships Graduate Student Opportunities Undergraduate Opportunities International Perspectives Service Projects Habitat for Humanity s Women Build Project Fluids Lab Meet Our Faculty and Staff Brandon Barquist Talking Shop Pablo Carrica Enjoying the Challenge George Constantinescu Rivers Run in the Family Carrie Davis Playing in the Mud Teresa Gaffey Transformations Anton Kruger How Stuff Works Troy Lyons Bridging the Gap Ricardo Mantilla Going with the Flow Jacob Odgaard Making an Impact Michelle Scherer Solving the Puzzle Fred Stern Revolutionizing Ship Hydrodynamics Stephanie Surine She s a Rocker Eric Tate Studying the Human Costs of Flooding H S Udaykumar The Reluctant Engineer Gabriele Villarini Working the Numbers Mark Wilson What s Not to Like Meet Our Students Tibebu Ayalew Accidental Engineer Ali Reza Firoozfar The Experimentalist Ruben Llamas Success among Friends Beda Luitel Finding a Way Kara Prior For the Love of Discovery Harvest Schroeder The Human Factor Stephanie Then Like a Duck to Water Meet Our Alumni Jim Ashton Turnaround Guy Maria Laura Beninati The Iowa Embrace Paul Dierking The Inquisitive Engineer Scott Hagen Far from the Farm J V Loperfido Going with the Flow Student Organization SIIHR Contact Us Research The Iowa Nutrient Research Center Iowa Geological Survey The IGS Rock Library Water Sustainability Initiative Water Quality Everyone s Responsibility Water Communication A New Field The Human Costs of Flooding Biofluids Developing a Digital Lung The Dynamics of Heart Valves Metastatic Cancer Cells and Shear Stress Environmental Engineering Science PCBs A Disturbing Legacy and Ongoing Threat Aboard the Lake Guardian Plume Chasers Landfill Fire Sparks Research Fish Passage Taming Total Dissolved Gas Hydraulic Structures The IIHR Dropshaft Solution Modernizing London s Sewers Hydrometeorology LiDAR Studies Iowa Flood Center A Story

    Original URL path: http://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/engineering-shops-services/capabilities-services-2/construction-fabrication-2/ (2015-11-11)
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  • Physical Modeling – IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering – University of Iowa
    making your next physical modeling project a success Tags fluid mechanics IIHR mechanical shop UI facilities Last modified on June 29th 2015 Posted on July 17th 2014 Home About Greetings from the Director Fact Page IIHR at a Glance Where is IIHR Communications History IIHR s Historical Studies History Resources Hans Albert Einstein His Life as a Pioneering Engineer Sustainability at IIHR Evolving with the Times Intellectual Connections Worldwide IIHR Alumni Worldwide Archives Films by Hunter Rouse Employment Contact IIHR Webcam Education Graduate Program Admission Assistantships and Fellowships Graduate Student Opportunities Undergraduate Opportunities International Perspectives Service Projects Habitat for Humanity s Women Build Project Fluids Lab Meet Our Faculty and Staff Brandon Barquist Talking Shop Pablo Carrica Enjoying the Challenge George Constantinescu Rivers Run in the Family Carrie Davis Playing in the Mud Teresa Gaffey Transformations Anton Kruger How Stuff Works Troy Lyons Bridging the Gap Ricardo Mantilla Going with the Flow Jacob Odgaard Making an Impact Michelle Scherer Solving the Puzzle Fred Stern Revolutionizing Ship Hydrodynamics Stephanie Surine She s a Rocker Eric Tate Studying the Human Costs of Flooding H S Udaykumar The Reluctant Engineer Gabriele Villarini Working the Numbers Mark Wilson What s Not to Like Meet Our Students Tibebu Ayalew Accidental Engineer Ali Reza Firoozfar The Experimentalist Ruben Llamas Success among Friends Beda Luitel Finding a Way Kara Prior For the Love of Discovery Harvest Schroeder The Human Factor Stephanie Then Like a Duck to Water Meet Our Alumni Jim Ashton Turnaround Guy Maria Laura Beninati The Iowa Embrace Paul Dierking The Inquisitive Engineer Scott Hagen Far from the Farm J V Loperfido Going with the Flow Student Organization SIIHR Contact Us Research The Iowa Nutrient Research Center Iowa Geological Survey The IGS Rock Library Water Sustainability Initiative Water Quality Everyone s Responsibility Water Communication A

    Original URL path: http://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/engineering-shops-services/capabilities-services-2/physical-modeling-2/ (2015-11-11)
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  • CFD Modeling – IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering – University of Iowa
    are complemented by model scale physical experiments conducted at the institute s facilities that support the design and construction of large models This combination of computer simulation and experimental modeling is putting IIHR at the cutting edge of research in fish passage design total dissolved gas prediction in rivers and ship hydrodynamics To learn more about how CFD modeling at IIHR is being used to monitor total dissolved gas visit our Total Dissolved Gas Modeling website The IIHR Engineering Shops Services division has extensive experience supporting and facilitating CFD as well as the physical experiments to verify it We look forward to discussing your CFD needs please contact IESS today Tags CFD CFDShip Iowa computational fluid dynamics IIHR University of Iowa Last modified on June 29th 2015 Posted on July 17th 2014 Home About Greetings from the Director Fact Page IIHR at a Glance Where is IIHR Communications History IIHR s Historical Studies History Resources Hans Albert Einstein His Life as a Pioneering Engineer Sustainability at IIHR Evolving with the Times Intellectual Connections Worldwide IIHR Alumni Worldwide Archives Films by Hunter Rouse Employment Contact IIHR Webcam Education Graduate Program Admission Assistantships and Fellowships Graduate Student Opportunities Undergraduate Opportunities International Perspectives Service Projects Habitat for Humanity s Women Build Project Fluids Lab Meet Our Faculty and Staff Brandon Barquist Talking Shop Pablo Carrica Enjoying the Challenge George Constantinescu Rivers Run in the Family Carrie Davis Playing in the Mud Teresa Gaffey Transformations Anton Kruger How Stuff Works Troy Lyons Bridging the Gap Ricardo Mantilla Going with the Flow Jacob Odgaard Making an Impact Michelle Scherer Solving the Puzzle Fred Stern Revolutionizing Ship Hydrodynamics Stephanie Surine She s a Rocker Eric Tate Studying the Human Costs of Flooding H S Udaykumar The Reluctant Engineer Gabriele Villarini Working the Numbers Mark Wilson What s Not to Like Meet Our Students Tibebu Ayalew Accidental Engineer Ali Reza Firoozfar The Experimentalist Ruben Llamas Success among Friends Beda Luitel Finding a Way Kara Prior For the Love of Discovery Harvest Schroeder The Human Factor Stephanie Then Like a Duck to Water Meet Our Alumni Jim Ashton Turnaround Guy Maria Laura Beninati The Iowa Embrace Paul Dierking The Inquisitive Engineer Scott Hagen Far from the Farm J V Loperfido Going with the Flow Student Organization SIIHR Contact Us Research The Iowa Nutrient Research Center Iowa Geological Survey The IGS Rock Library Water Sustainability Initiative Water Quality Everyone s Responsibility Water Communication A New Field The Human Costs of Flooding Biofluids Developing a Digital Lung The Dynamics of Heart Valves Metastatic Cancer Cells and Shear Stress Environmental Engineering Science PCBs A Disturbing Legacy and Ongoing Threat Aboard the Lake Guardian Plume Chasers Landfill Fire Sparks Research Fish Passage Taming Total Dissolved Gas Hydraulic Structures The IIHR Dropshaft Solution Modernizing London s Sewers Hydrometeorology LiDAR Studies Iowa Flood Center A Story of Flood Preparedness IFC Research Initiatives The Iowa Floodplain Mapping Project Floodplain Mapping Kalona Iowa Stream Sensor Gallery Ship Hydrodynamics Bubbly Wake and Submarines Watershed Processes Iowa Watersheds

    Original URL path: http://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/engineering-shops-services/capabilities-services-2/cfd-modeling-2/ (2015-11-11)
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  • Electronics & Instrumentation – IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering – University of Iowa
    output of the instrument can be as simple as user visualization or as complex as automated computer sampling at the rate of up to 2 million samples per second However because many IIHR model studies are unique data acquisition systems are often not commercially available Shop personnel commonly purchase or build equipment components and incorporate them into customized data acquisition systems to fit each project s needs Shop personnel also design and maintain electrical power and control systems for IIHR buildings including fan and pump speed control systems probe positioning systems flume tilting control systems and special electrical requirements for research equipment The Electronics Shop provides the latest advances in measurement technologies Some of these technologies include ADV acoustic Doppler velocimetry LDV laser Doppler velocimetry PIV particle image velocimetry ADCP acoustic Doppler current profiler Single and multi beam sonar LiDAR light detection and ranging This combination of the latest in computers and data acquisition boards along with the state of the art data collection and analysis software provides data as accurate and organized as possible Whatever your electronics and instrumentation needs the experts at IESS can help Contact us today Tags fluid mechanics hydraulics IIHR LiDAR UI research University of Iowa Last modified on June 29th 2015 Posted on July 17th 2014 Home About Greetings from the Director Fact Page IIHR at a Glance Where is IIHR Communications History IIHR s Historical Studies History Resources Hans Albert Einstein His Life as a Pioneering Engineer Sustainability at IIHR Evolving with the Times Intellectual Connections Worldwide IIHR Alumni Worldwide Archives Films by Hunter Rouse Employment Contact IIHR Webcam Education Graduate Program Admission Assistantships and Fellowships Graduate Student Opportunities Undergraduate Opportunities International Perspectives Service Projects Habitat for Humanity s Women Build Project Fluids Lab Meet Our Faculty and Staff Brandon Barquist Talking Shop Pablo Carrica Enjoying the Challenge George Constantinescu Rivers Run in the Family Carrie Davis Playing in the Mud Teresa Gaffey Transformations Anton Kruger How Stuff Works Troy Lyons Bridging the Gap Ricardo Mantilla Going with the Flow Jacob Odgaard Making an Impact Michelle Scherer Solving the Puzzle Fred Stern Revolutionizing Ship Hydrodynamics Stephanie Surine She s a Rocker Eric Tate Studying the Human Costs of Flooding H S Udaykumar The Reluctant Engineer Gabriele Villarini Working the Numbers Mark Wilson What s Not to Like Meet Our Students Tibebu Ayalew Accidental Engineer Ali Reza Firoozfar The Experimentalist Ruben Llamas Success among Friends Beda Luitel Finding a Way Kara Prior For the Love of Discovery Harvest Schroeder The Human Factor Stephanie Then Like a Duck to Water Meet Our Alumni Jim Ashton Turnaround Guy Maria Laura Beninati The Iowa Embrace Paul Dierking The Inquisitive Engineer Scott Hagen Far from the Farm J V Loperfido Going with the Flow Student Organization SIIHR Contact Us Research The Iowa Nutrient Research Center Iowa Geological Survey The IGS Rock Library Water Sustainability Initiative Water Quality Everyone s Responsibility Water Communication A New Field The Human Costs of Flooding Biofluids Developing a Digital Lung The Dynamics of

    Original URL path: http://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/engineering-shops-services/capabilities-services-2/electronics-instrumentation-2/ (2015-11-11)
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  • Flume Design – IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering – University of Iowa
    flume in 1941 Research and Education Students and faculty make good use of IIHR s flumes Environmental Flow This recirculating laboratory flume has a test section that is 65 feet long High Velocity The high velocity flume is frequently used for student research Kennedy Flume This is a low gradient sediment flume capable of slope ranging from 1 5 to 3 Tracking Sediments Large scale sediment recirculating flume Adding Dye to a Flume Tilting Flume Multipurpose and self contained this recirculating tilting flume can go from 0 to 15 3D Rendering A state of the art steep gradient flume A A A A Contact IESS today to discuss how we can help meet your flume needs Tags mechanical shop UI facilities Last modified on June 29th 2015 Posted on August 6th 2014 Home About Greetings from the Director Fact Page IIHR at a Glance Where is IIHR Communications History IIHR s Historical Studies History Resources Hans Albert Einstein His Life as a Pioneering Engineer Sustainability at IIHR Evolving with the Times Intellectual Connections Worldwide IIHR Alumni Worldwide Archives Films by Hunter Rouse Employment Contact IIHR Webcam Education Graduate Program Admission Assistantships and Fellowships Graduate Student Opportunities Undergraduate Opportunities International Perspectives Service Projects Habitat for Humanity s Women Build Project Fluids Lab Meet Our Faculty and Staff Brandon Barquist Talking Shop Pablo Carrica Enjoying the Challenge George Constantinescu Rivers Run in the Family Carrie Davis Playing in the Mud Teresa Gaffey Transformations Anton Kruger How Stuff Works Troy Lyons Bridging the Gap Ricardo Mantilla Going with the Flow Jacob Odgaard Making an Impact Michelle Scherer Solving the Puzzle Fred Stern Revolutionizing Ship Hydrodynamics Stephanie Surine She s a Rocker Eric Tate Studying the Human Costs of Flooding H S Udaykumar The Reluctant Engineer Gabriele Villarini Working the Numbers Mark Wilson What s Not to Like Meet Our Students Tibebu Ayalew Accidental Engineer Ali Reza Firoozfar The Experimentalist Ruben Llamas Success among Friends Beda Luitel Finding a Way Kara Prior For the Love of Discovery Harvest Schroeder The Human Factor Stephanie Then Like a Duck to Water Meet Our Alumni Jim Ashton Turnaround Guy Maria Laura Beninati The Iowa Embrace Paul Dierking The Inquisitive Engineer Scott Hagen Far from the Farm J V Loperfido Going with the Flow Student Organization SIIHR Contact Us Research The Iowa Nutrient Research Center Iowa Geological Survey The IGS Rock Library Water Sustainability Initiative Water Quality Everyone s Responsibility Water Communication A New Field The Human Costs of Flooding Biofluids Developing a Digital Lung The Dynamics of Heart Valves Metastatic Cancer Cells and Shear Stress Environmental Engineering Science PCBs A Disturbing Legacy and Ongoing Threat Aboard the Lake Guardian Plume Chasers Landfill Fire Sparks Research Fish Passage Taming Total Dissolved Gas Hydraulic Structures The IIHR Dropshaft Solution Modernizing London s Sewers Hydrometeorology LiDAR Studies Iowa Flood Center A Story of Flood Preparedness IFC Research Initiatives The Iowa Floodplain Mapping Project Floodplain Mapping Kalona Iowa Stream Sensor Gallery Ship Hydrodynamics Bubbly Wake and Submarines Watershed Processes Iowa Watersheds

    Original URL path: http://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/engineering-shops-services/capabilities-services-2/flume-design/ (2015-11-11)
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  • Design and Drafting – IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering – University of Iowa
    to design and fabricate customized brackets and enclosures as needed Examples of IESS design work Instrumentation to simulate lightning strikes on cloth Flume design for clients including the University of Maryland University of North Carolina University of Wisconsin University at Buffalo and New Mexico Tech Design and construction of enclosures and anchors for a network of water quality sensors including deployment and maintenance Drafting The skilled technicians at IIHR develop 3D drawings for model construction projects at all stages of the design process from proposal development to initial design and model layout through construction and experimental equipment arrangements The IESS 3D printer can rapidly fabricate smaller products with intricate internal shapes All drafting at IESS begins in 3D which supports greater efficiency and allows for better visualization of the final product by shop staff and clients IESS drafters primarily use PTC Creo a software package that allows them to quickly create analyze view and control product designs They are also proficient with ProE and Solidworks as well as AutoCAD IESS technicians will choose the best package for each particular project for instance 3D drawings created with ProE can easily be converted into a format used by the shop s CNC milling machines to quickly and efficiently fabricate the product In other cases the shop s 3D printer can be used to rapidly fabricate smaller pieces with intricate internal shapes Contact IESS today to learn more about our design and drafting capabilities Graduate student Ali Reza Firoozfar at work at IIHR s James Street Laboratory which offers 17 000 square feet for the construction of large hydraulic models IIHR Assistant Research Engineer James Buchholz center working with graduate students Craig Wojcek and Jordan Null They are using particle image velocimetry PIV to visualize flow IESS has extensive experience building hydraulic models in IIHR s labs and annexes Tags design Last modified on June 16th 2015 Posted on August 6th 2014 Home About Greetings from the Director Fact Page IIHR at a Glance Where is IIHR Communications History IIHR s Historical Studies History Resources Hans Albert Einstein His Life as a Pioneering Engineer Sustainability at IIHR Evolving with the Times Intellectual Connections Worldwide IIHR Alumni Worldwide Archives Films by Hunter Rouse Employment Contact IIHR Webcam Education Graduate Program Admission Assistantships and Fellowships Graduate Student Opportunities Undergraduate Opportunities International Perspectives Service Projects Habitat for Humanity s Women Build Project Fluids Lab Meet Our Faculty and Staff Brandon Barquist Talking Shop Pablo Carrica Enjoying the Challenge George Constantinescu Rivers Run in the Family Carrie Davis Playing in the Mud Teresa Gaffey Transformations Anton Kruger How Stuff Works Troy Lyons Bridging the Gap Ricardo Mantilla Going with the Flow Jacob Odgaard Making an Impact Michelle Scherer Solving the Puzzle Fred Stern Revolutionizing Ship Hydrodynamics Stephanie Surine She s a Rocker Eric Tate Studying the Human Costs of Flooding H S Udaykumar The Reluctant Engineer Gabriele Villarini Working the Numbers Mark Wilson What s Not to Like Meet Our Students Tibebu Ayalew Accidental Engineer Ali Reza

    Original URL path: http://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/engineering-shops-services/capabilities-services-2/design-drafting/ (2015-11-11)
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