archive-edu.com » EDU » U » UIOWA.EDU

Total: 1406

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Oil and Coastal Plants – IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering – University of Iowa
    a sample of crude oil polluting the Gulf Back in Iowa City the team s work is progressing in the lab where they are simulating the spill by adding oil in varying amounts to beakers containing the sediment and native salt marsh plant samples They hope to learn how the plants react to oil how much they can tolerate and how quickly they can recover Beenk says that the overarching goal of the research is to study how phytoremediation could help restore the marshlands if they die He and Gwinnup hope their research can help produce some good out of a bad situation The oil spill while a terrible occurrence provided a large scale natural experiment on the effect of crude oil on threatened salt marshes in the Gulf Coast Gwinnup says Since the well has been capped authorities have reported that the Gulf is recovering more quickly than expected from the environmental disaster Gwinnup has his doubts Certainly the Gulf contains a healthy population of microbes that are proficient at metabolizing oil and its constituent chemicals he says I am however very concerned about the chemical dispersants used Gwinnup says Research has shown that the dispersants are more toxic than the oil itself and the microbes in the Gulf have evolved to proficiently deal with oil not dispersant and not oil mixed with dispersant It is possible that the dispersants could dramatically increase the time it takes nature to break down the oil if they create large deep water hypoxic plumes of neutrally buoyant oil Tags Deepwater Horizon Jerry Schnoor phytoremediation UI research water quality Last modified on June 25th 2015 Posted on January 19th 2011 Home About Greetings from the Director Fact Page IIHR at a Glance Where is IIHR Communications History IIHR s Historical Studies History Resources Hans Albert Einstein His Life as a Pioneering Engineer Sustainability at IIHR Evolving with the Times Intellectual Connections Worldwide IIHR Alumni Worldwide Archives Films by Hunter Rouse Employment Contact IIHR Webcam Education Graduate Program Admission Assistantships and Fellowships Graduate Student Opportunities Undergraduate Opportunities International Perspectives Service Projects Habitat for Humanity s Women Build Project Fluids Lab Meet Our Faculty and Staff Brandon Barquist Talking Shop Pablo Carrica Enjoying the Challenge George Constantinescu Rivers Run in the Family Carrie Davis Playing in the Mud Teresa Gaffey Transformations Anton Kruger How Stuff Works Troy Lyons Bridging the Gap Ricardo Mantilla Going with the Flow Jacob Odgaard Making an Impact Michelle Scherer Solving the Puzzle Fred Stern Revolutionizing Ship Hydrodynamics Stephanie Surine She s a Rocker Eric Tate Studying the Human Costs of Flooding H S Udaykumar The Reluctant Engineer Gabriele Villarini Working the Numbers Mark Wilson What s Not to Like Meet Our Students Tibebu Ayalew Accidental Engineer Ali Reza Firoozfar The Experimentalist Ruben Llamas Success among Friends Beda Luitel Finding a Way Kara Prior For the Love of Discovery Harvest Schroeder The Human Factor Stephanie Then Like a Duck to Water Meet Our Alumni Jim Ashton Turnaround Guy Maria Laura Beninati

    Original URL path: http://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/research/other-research-initiatives/oils-and-coastal-plants/ (2015-11-11)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Knee-deep in Research – IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering – University of Iowa
    self fund his studies at Wyoming for one semester When I met Robert Ettema it was a turning point Basnet says A professor of civil and architectural engineering at Wyoming Ettema introduced Basnet to hydraulic structures and opened up a job opportunity for him I started to play with the water and I started to enjoy it Basnet says What I found is that flow is dynamic and I started to compare it with my life I decided to move to hydraulics completely Ettema encouraged Basnet to transfer to IIHR at the University of Iowa where Ettema had spent 27 years as an engineering professor During his time at IIHR Basnet has experienced both the good and bad dynamics of life In 2012 he lost his mom just a year after his only daughter was born I was really confused at that time but my advisors gave me some way out Basnet says I am grateful that my advisors are not only teaching in the research area but they understand and help my situation Basnet lives in Iowa City with his wife Ganga and their two children He plans to graduate with a PhD in civil engineering with a concentration in hydraulics and water resources in July 2015 Tags George Constantinescu I 35 Iowa Department of Transportation Iowa DOT Keshav Basnet Marian Muste Nepal Robert Ettema Shianne Gruss snow fence Home About Greetings from the Director Fact Page IIHR at a Glance Where is IIHR Communications History IIHR s Historical Studies History Resources Hans Albert Einstein His Life as a Pioneering Engineer Sustainability at IIHR Evolving with the Times Intellectual Connections Worldwide IIHR Alumni Worldwide Archives Films by Hunter Rouse Employment Contact IIHR Webcam Education Graduate Program Admission Assistantships and Fellowships Graduate Student Opportunities Undergraduate Opportunities International Perspectives Service Projects Habitat for Humanity s Women Build Project Fluids Lab Meet Our Faculty and Staff Brandon Barquist Talking Shop Pablo Carrica Enjoying the Challenge George Constantinescu Rivers Run in the Family Carrie Davis Playing in the Mud Teresa Gaffey Transformations Anton Kruger How Stuff Works Troy Lyons Bridging the Gap Ricardo Mantilla Going with the Flow Jacob Odgaard Making an Impact Michelle Scherer Solving the Puzzle Fred Stern Revolutionizing Ship Hydrodynamics Stephanie Surine She s a Rocker Eric Tate Studying the Human Costs of Flooding H S Udaykumar The Reluctant Engineer Gabriele Villarini Working the Numbers Mark Wilson What s Not to Like Meet Our Students Tibebu Ayalew Accidental Engineer Ali Reza Firoozfar The Experimentalist Ruben Llamas Success among Friends Beda Luitel Finding a Way Kara Prior For the Love of Discovery Harvest Schroeder The Human Factor Stephanie Then Like a Duck to Water Meet Our Alumni Jim Ashton Turnaround Guy Maria Laura Beninati The Iowa Embrace Paul Dierking The Inquisitive Engineer Scott Hagen Far from the Farm J V Loperfido Going with the Flow Student Organization SIIHR Contact Us Research The Iowa Nutrient Research Center Iowa Geological Survey The IGS Rock Library Water Sustainability Initiative Water Quality Everyone s Responsibility

    Original URL path: http://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/blog/2015/03/01/knee-deep-in-research/ (2015-11-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Understanding Livestock Emissions – IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering – University of Iowa
    They also contain ammonia and other dangerous substances Ammonia is not good for people Eichinger says Near and in chicken facilities the ammonia concentrations are not good Eichinger makes a point to stay out of the politics swirling around livestock confinement facilities His goal he says is to understand what s happening and get the community to accept his ideas which has not been easy The ag community hasn t really responded Eichinger admits He doesn t let that deter him His job he says is to figure out how to make these facilities work better He envisions an improved building design plus strategic shelter belts to enhance lofting so emissions will dilute faster and higher in the atmosphere reducing risk for everyone Riding the Whale Team LiDAR travels to livestock farms in a 20 year old customized RV they affectionately call The Whale Once at the site they can set up their equipment within half a day They spend an average of about a week gathering data at each site The team also expands to include Jerry Hatfield and John Prueger colleagues from the National Soil Tilth Laboratory They construct temporary towers to deploy micrometeorology instruments at several elevations near the livestock facilities We value the collaboration with Bill as one of the most rewarding aspects of our professional careers Hatfield explains Without this interaction we would not be able to provide some answers to some of the most difficult questions about air quality Gil Bohrer assistant professor for ecological engineering at Ohio State University contributes computational fluid dynamics CFD modeling expertise to the team Physics graduate student Brad Barnhart appreciates working on such a diverse collaborative team Our LiDAR team is a close knit group Barnhart says We are just like any sports team ¼ Everyone knows what needs to be done and we divide up and get it done And Team LiDAR can really get it done We all work together Plenner says Barnhart adds We don t have specialized jobs This is great because you don t have to do the same thing on every project and it allows you to learn about every aspect of LiDAR data collection Eichinger s informal style is perfect for this group Barnhart says Bill is a great mentor He lets students choose their projects and allows them the time needed ¼ We have very few rules We re not required to stay late or even stay for set hours This ¼ puts the responsibility in our hands ¼ We do our work because we love to do it not because we have to Eichinger agrees We have a good time he says If it s not fun it s not worth doing Tags Bill Eichinger LiDAR National Soil Tilth Laboratory UI research Last modified on June 25th 2015 Posted on December 13th 2011 Home About Greetings from the Director Fact Page IIHR at a Glance Where is IIHR Communications History IIHR s Historical Studies History Resources Hans Albert Einstein

    Original URL path: http://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/research/hydrometeorology/lidar-studies/understanding-livestock-emissions/ (2015-11-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • AchilleasFlume – IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering – University of Iowa
    Survey Water Sustainability Initiative Biofluids Environmental Engineering Science Fish Passage Hydraulic Structures Hydrometeorology Iowa Flood Center Ship Hydrodynamics Watershed Processes Other Research Initiatives Instrumentation and Technology Safety Information Publications and Other Media Shops Services Capabilities and Services Featured Projects IESS Facilities Contact Us Facilities Resources Stanley Hydraulics Lab Annexes Labs Shops LACMRERS Support Services People Research Staff Support Staff Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Scholars IIHR Advisory Board News Events Education

    Original URL path: http://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/research/instrumentation-and-technology/attachment/achilleasflume-2/ (2015-11-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Tag Archive for "LACMRERS" – IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering – University of Iowa
    their first mussel from the Mississippi River mud they are hooked IIHR researchers have led countless mussel based research projects including efforts to re establish endangered species in Midwestern rivers At LACMRERS a display of IIHR Hosts Honors Workshop Posted on October 6th 2013 IIHR hosted one of 16 Honors Primetime workshops held for incoming first year honors students before the official start of classes this fall What s New at LACMRERS Posted on August 19th 2013 There s always something interesting happening at the Lucille A Carver Mississippi Riverside Environmental Research Station LACMRERS LACMRERS is a place where people meet to study collaborate and learn about the Upper Mississippi River often while having a lot of fun Whether it s students gathering to try out some hands on science on the river or Rivers as Bridges Posted on August 17th 2012 The Lucille A Carver Mississippi Riverside Environmental Research Station LACMRERS recently welcomed some of China s finest high school students to learn about the Mississippi River Older Entries Home About Greetings from the Director Fact Page IIHR at a Glance Where is IIHR Communications History IIHR s Historical Studies History Resources Hans Albert Einstein His Life as a Pioneering Engineer Sustainability at IIHR Evolving with the Times Intellectual Connections Worldwide IIHR Alumni Worldwide Archives Films by Hunter Rouse Employment Contact IIHR Webcam Education Graduate Program Admission Assistantships and Fellowships Graduate Student Opportunities Undergraduate Opportunities International Perspectives Service Projects Habitat for Humanity s Women Build Project Fluids Lab Meet Our Faculty and Staff Brandon Barquist Talking Shop Pablo Carrica Enjoying the Challenge George Constantinescu Rivers Run in the Family Carrie Davis Playing in the Mud Teresa Gaffey Transformations Anton Kruger How Stuff Works Troy Lyons Bridging the Gap Ricardo Mantilla Going with the Flow Jacob Odgaard Making an Impact Michelle Scherer Solving the Puzzle Fred Stern Revolutionizing Ship Hydrodynamics Stephanie Surine She s a Rocker Eric Tate Studying the Human Costs of Flooding H S Udaykumar The Reluctant Engineer Gabriele Villarini Working the Numbers Mark Wilson What s Not to Like Meet Our Students Tibebu Ayalew Accidental Engineer Ali Reza Firoozfar The Experimentalist Ruben Llamas Success among Friends Beda Luitel Finding a Way Kara Prior For the Love of Discovery Harvest Schroeder The Human Factor Stephanie Then Like a Duck to Water Meet Our Alumni Jim Ashton Turnaround Guy Maria Laura Beninati The Iowa Embrace Paul Dierking The Inquisitive Engineer Scott Hagen Far from the Farm J V Loperfido Going with the Flow Student Organization SIIHR Contact Us Research The Iowa Nutrient Research Center Iowa Geological Survey The IGS Rock Library Water Sustainability Initiative Water Quality Everyone s Responsibility Water Communication A New Field The Human Costs of Flooding Biofluids Developing a Digital Lung The Dynamics of Heart Valves Metastatic Cancer Cells and Shear Stress Environmental Engineering Science PCBs A Disturbing Legacy and Ongoing Threat Aboard the Lake Guardian Plume Chasers Landfill Fire Sparks Research Fish Passage Taming Total Dissolved Gas Hydraulic Structures The IIHR Dropshaft Solution Modernizing London

    Original URL path: http://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/blog/topic/lacmrers/ (2015-11-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Tag Archive for "Lucille A. Carver Mississippi Riverside Environmental Research Station" – IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering – University of Iowa
    news The problems are so complex they often seem beyond the scope of what one person can address As director of LACMRERS the Lucille A Carver Mississippi Riverside Environmental Research Station Doug Schnoebelen knows exactly how challenging the problems can be He doesn t let that Boat Safety Guidelines Posted on May 6th 2011 by Douglas J Schnoebelen LACMRERS Director Introduction River and lake research for hydrologists geologists engineers biologists and other scientists often involves the use of boats under a variety of conditions In particular scientists from the University of Iowa s IIHR Hydroscience Engineering and the Lucille A Carver Mississippi Riverside Environmental Research Station LACMRERS routinely depend on Young Problem Solvers Visit LACMRERS Posted on April 25th 2011 Thirty five student participants in the Future Problem Solvers program recently visited the Lucille A Carver Mississippi River Environmental Research Station LACMRERS to learn more about water quality Instrumentation and Technology Posted on February 3rd 2011 One of IIHR s strengths is found in its continuing visionary commitment to maintaining and enhancing its experimental facilities while at the same time pioneering efforts in high speed computational analysis and simulation of complex flow phenomena This combination perhaps makes IIHR unique among fluids research laboratories and permits varying yet complementary approaches for investigation and solution Older Entries Home About Greetings from the Director Fact Page IIHR at a Glance Where is IIHR Communications History IIHR s Historical Studies History Resources Hans Albert Einstein His Life as a Pioneering Engineer Sustainability at IIHR Evolving with the Times Intellectual Connections Worldwide IIHR Alumni Worldwide Archives Films by Hunter Rouse Employment Contact IIHR Webcam Education Graduate Program Admission Assistantships and Fellowships Graduate Student Opportunities Undergraduate Opportunities International Perspectives Service Projects Habitat for Humanity s Women Build Project Fluids Lab Meet Our Faculty and Staff Brandon Barquist Talking Shop Pablo Carrica Enjoying the Challenge George Constantinescu Rivers Run in the Family Carrie Davis Playing in the Mud Teresa Gaffey Transformations Anton Kruger How Stuff Works Troy Lyons Bridging the Gap Ricardo Mantilla Going with the Flow Jacob Odgaard Making an Impact Michelle Scherer Solving the Puzzle Fred Stern Revolutionizing Ship Hydrodynamics Stephanie Surine She s a Rocker Eric Tate Studying the Human Costs of Flooding H S Udaykumar The Reluctant Engineer Gabriele Villarini Working the Numbers Mark Wilson What s Not to Like Meet Our Students Tibebu Ayalew Accidental Engineer Ali Reza Firoozfar The Experimentalist Ruben Llamas Success among Friends Beda Luitel Finding a Way Kara Prior For the Love of Discovery Harvest Schroeder The Human Factor Stephanie Then Like a Duck to Water Meet Our Alumni Jim Ashton Turnaround Guy Maria Laura Beninati The Iowa Embrace Paul Dierking The Inquisitive Engineer Scott Hagen Far from the Farm J V Loperfido Going with the Flow Student Organization SIIHR Contact Us Research The Iowa Nutrient Research Center Iowa Geological Survey The IGS Rock Library Water Sustainability Initiative Water Quality Everyone s Responsibility Water Communication A New Field The Human Costs of Flooding Biofluids Developing a Digital Lung

    Original URL path: http://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/blog/topic/lucille-a-carver-mississippi-riverside-environmental-research-station/ (2015-11-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Tag Archive for "UI facilities" – IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering – University of Iowa
    to Cal Tech where he had been invited to present a seminar Then IIHR Director Jack Kennedy Combining Flows at an Open Channel Junction Posted on September 10th 2012 Investigators Larry J Weber and Eric Shumate Research Objective The junction of two open channels is a common occurrence in many hydraulic structures ranging from waste water treatment facilities to fish passage conveyance structures Currently only limited data exists on the detailed flow conditions occurring at open channel junctions This study focuses on detailed measurements About the Fluids Lab Posted on August 11th 2011 Educational Innovation An IIHR Tradition Instruction in Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics has always been a central function of IIHR Hydroscience Engineering formerly known as the Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research Although a research institute IIHR has been part of the university s College of Engineering originally the College of Applied Science from the start IIHR s first Environmental Flow Facility Posted on April 12th 2011 The Environmental Flow Facility EFF is a recirculating laboratory flume having a test section 65 feet long 10 feet wide and 7 5 feet deep The structure is built of concrete and steel with eight four foot wide plate glass windows for flow visualization on the test section The remaining sides and the floor are of 1 1 8 inch Floor Plan James Street Lab Posted on March 22nd 2011 Older Entries Home About Greetings from the Director Fact Page IIHR at a Glance Where is IIHR Communications History IIHR s Historical Studies History Resources Hans Albert Einstein His Life as a Pioneering Engineer Sustainability at IIHR Evolving with the Times Intellectual Connections Worldwide IIHR Alumni Worldwide Archives Films by Hunter Rouse Employment Contact IIHR Webcam Education Graduate Program Admission Assistantships and Fellowships Graduate Student Opportunities Undergraduate Opportunities International Perspectives Service Projects Habitat for Humanity s Women Build Project Fluids Lab Meet Our Faculty and Staff Brandon Barquist Talking Shop Pablo Carrica Enjoying the Challenge George Constantinescu Rivers Run in the Family Carrie Davis Playing in the Mud Teresa Gaffey Transformations Anton Kruger How Stuff Works Troy Lyons Bridging the Gap Ricardo Mantilla Going with the Flow Jacob Odgaard Making an Impact Michelle Scherer Solving the Puzzle Fred Stern Revolutionizing Ship Hydrodynamics Stephanie Surine She s a Rocker Eric Tate Studying the Human Costs of Flooding H S Udaykumar The Reluctant Engineer Gabriele Villarini Working the Numbers Mark Wilson What s Not to Like Meet Our Students Tibebu Ayalew Accidental Engineer Ali Reza Firoozfar The Experimentalist Ruben Llamas Success among Friends Beda Luitel Finding a Way Kara Prior For the Love of Discovery Harvest Schroeder The Human Factor Stephanie Then Like a Duck to Water Meet Our Alumni Jim Ashton Turnaround Guy Maria Laura Beninati The Iowa Embrace Paul Dierking The Inquisitive Engineer Scott Hagen Far from the Farm J V Loperfido Going with the Flow Student Organization SIIHR Contact Us Research The Iowa Nutrient Research Center Iowa Geological Survey The IGS Rock Library Water Sustainability Initiative Water Quality Everyone s Responsibility

    Original URL path: http://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/blog/topic/ui-facilities/ (2015-11-11)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Small Unmanned Aircraft System—Safety Guidelines – IIHR – Hydroscience & Engineering – University of Iowa
    of collision the drone operator must be the first to maneuver away The operator must discontinue the flight when continuing would pose a hazard to other aircraft people or property The operator must assess weather conditions airspace restrictions and the location of people to lessen risks if he or she loses control of the UAS The drone may not fly over people except those directly involved with the flight The drone must operate below 500 feet altitude and no faster than 100 mph Drones must stay out of airport flight paths and restricted airspace areas and obey any FAA Temporary Flight Restrictions TFRs Privacy The use of imaging technology for aerial surveillance by radio controlled model aircraft with the capability to obtain high resolution photographs and or video or using any types of sensors for the collection retention or dissemination of surveillance data or information on individuals homes businesses or property at locations where there is a reasonable expectation of privacy is strictly prohibited unless express written permission is obtained from the individual property owners or managers Public Entities University sUAS Use Public entities which include publically funded universities law enforcement fire departments and other government agencies may currently apply for a COA from the FAA in order to use small UAS in public aircraft operations Who can obtain a COA to operate public aircraft Only government entities such as federal and state government agencies law enforcement agencies and public colleges and universities can receive a COA for public UAS aircraft operations Public aircraft operations must be conducted for a governmental function COAs are most commonly issued to public government entities but are also required for civil private operations The FAA thoroughly evaluates each COA application to determine the safety of the proposal COAs are issued for a specific period of time usually two years and include special provisions unique to each proposal such as a defined block of airspace and time of day small UAS can be used How can I apply for a COA Visit the FAA website for information on how to apply for a COA online Since 2009 the FAA has taken steps to streamline the application process by transitioning online The average authorization period is less than 60 days Expedited authorization is available in emergency and life threatening situations IIHR Hydroscience Engineering sUAS Policy tentative Scope This policy applies to IIHR employees and students operating unmanned aircraft systems in any location as part of their University employment or as part of University activities The operation by any person of unmanned aircraft system or model aircraft on or above University of Iowa property and The purchase of unmanned aircraft systems with funding through the University of Iowa including university accounts grants or UI Foundation accounts Policy Statement The operation of unmanned aircraft systems including drones and model aircraft is regulated by the Federal Aviation Administration FAA and relevant state law The University of Iowa will establish procedures required to ensure compliance with those legal obligations and to reduce risks to safety security and privacy Reason for Policy The University must comply with FAA requirements state law and any other locally applicable laws or regulations regarding unmanned aircraft systems Inherent risks in the operation of such equipment require additional insurance provisions and policy considerations Procedures All members of the University community are personally responsible for complying with FAA regulations state and federal laws and University policies Any IIHR employee or student wishing to operate a small unmanned aircraft systems sUAS as part of their University employment or as part of an University program must first obtain a 333 exemption or Certificate of Waiver or Authorization COA issued by the FAA The Research Computing Services RCS area is the FAA account holder for COAs at IIHR and must process all applications on a case by case basis Any University employee student or unit purchasing a sUAS or the parts to assemble a sUAS with university funds funds disbursed through a university account or grant funds must contact RCS in order to assess the University s ability to obtain a COA other necessary FAA exemptions or meet local compliance requirements Any third party or hobbyist wishing to use a sUAS or model aircraft over University property must first receive approval through RCS Third parties planning to use UAS must also provide proof of FAA approval In addition operation of an sUAS by a third party or hobbyist over University property must be under a contract that holds the University harmless from any resulting claims or harm to individuals and damage to University property and that provides insurance as required by the University In operating a sUAS for purposes of recording or transmitting visual images operators must take all reasonable measures to avoid violations of areas normally considered private Iowa state law provides that a person who knowingly or intentionally places a camera or electronic surveillance equipment that records images or data of any kind while unattended on the private property of another person without the consent of the owner or tenant of the private property commits a Class A misdemeanor Use of sUAS must comply with any other applicable University policies Appropriate and Prohibited Uses sUAS shall not be used to monitor or record areas where there is a reasonable expectation of privacy in accordance with accepted social norms These areas include but are not limited to restrooms locker rooms individual residential rooms changing or dressing rooms and health treatment rooms sUAS shall not be used to monitor or record residential hallways residential lounges or the interior of campus daycare facilities sUAS shall not be used to monitor or record sensitive institutional or personal information that may be found for example on an individual s workspaces or on computer or other electronic displays Definitions University of Iowa Property Buildings grounds and land that are owned by the University of Iowa or controlled by the University of Iowa via leases or other formal contractual arrangements to house ongoing University operations

    Original URL path: http://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/research/safety-information/small-unmanned-aircraft-system-safety-guidelines/ (2015-11-11)
    Open archived version from archive



  •