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  • Death, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    But death is both an ending and a beginning For most African peoples death is also the commencement of the new life of an ancestor Peoples all over the world create images of deceased ancestors whether they take the form of wooden sculpture or photographs in a grandparent s photo album This small ancestor figure from Mambila peoples of northern Nigeria was called tadep and was placed along with several

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/death/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Governance, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Wood L 56 2 cm 22 1 8 The University of Iowa Museum of Art The Stanley Collection X1986 357 Systems of social organization in Africa range from highly centralized states to noncentralized communities Centralized systems have a chief or king at the apex of a complex and well ordered political bureaucracy Noncentralized systems are more democratic in which councils of elders representing each of the families in a community meet to make decisions about the conduct of life Finally there are numerous peoples that lack any political organization or authority beyond the family Lobi peoples of Burkina Faso never had village or community chiefs nor did the hunter gatherers of the tropical rain forest of Central Africa Yet in each case status is important and art has an important role to play in reinforcing the social fabric A Lobi man gains status by his skill as a hunter and warrior and his importance is reflected in his possessions especially the three legged stool he carries with him whenever he visits the small cabarets that sell millet beer 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next Page See All View all images in the media gallery Subtopics Statement Art Process

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/governance/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Cultural Exchange, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    term tradition does not imply the static repetition of customs generation after generation that the word does in English Rather it refers to a dynamic living process combining continuity and change As one Yoruba scholar puts it innovation is implied in the Yoruba word for tradition Tradition is what we choose to remember and use from the past and something that is creatively actively intentionally selected and constructed not thoughtlessly

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/cultural-exchange/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Akan Brass Casting, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Arts in Africa Komo among Tagwa Senufo Peoples in Southwest Burkina Faso Kuba Art and Rule Life in the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Akan Brass Casting by Raymond Silverman University of Michigan 14 th century Egyptian brass container Nsoko Ghana Photo by Raymond Silverman The current archaeological and historical evidence suggests that objects made from copper and its alloys and the lost wax casting process a technology associated with the working of cuprous and auriferous metals were introduced to the Akan area in the 14th century It was at this time that Muslim merchants became aware of the rich

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/27 (2016-02-13)
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  • Akan Leadership Art and Ceremony, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    in Southwest Burkina Faso Kuba Art and Rule Life in the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Akan Leadership Art and Ceremony by Michelle Gilbert Trinity College Akropong Akwapim Akuapem Odwira festival Ghana Photo by Michelle Gilbert Akuapem a small ethnically heterogeneous Akan kingdom in southern Ghana was founded in 1733 The king is believed to be sacred his well being is linked to that of his people A symbol of the unity and continuity of the kingdom he is also feared The king s power is legitimized by his ancestors and revitalized each year in a rite called Odwira purification

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/41 (2016-02-13)
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  • Akan Leadership Arts, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    and Islamic Arts in Africa Komo among Tagwa Senufo Peoples in Southwest Burkina Faso Kuba Art and Rule Life in the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Akan Leadership Arts by Doran Ross Formerly Fowler Museum UCLA Court scene Akuropon Akuapem Ghana 1976 Photo by Doran Ross The Akan peoples of Ghana the former Gold Coast of West Africa are divided into a number of subgroups of which the Asante and Fante are best known Today the Asante are organized into a loose confederacy of fourteen states each headed by a paramount chief one of which the Asantehene is recognized as

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/8 (2016-02-13)
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  • Art and Architecture in Northern Ghana, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Context Islam and Islamic Arts in Africa Komo among Tagwa Senufo Peoples in Southwest Burkina Faso Kuba Art and Rule Life in the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Art and Architecture in Northern Ghana by Fred T Smith Kent State University Frafra compound northern Ghana Photo by Fred T Smith 1973 The Frafra a Voltaic people residing in northeastern Ghana consist of three culturally and linguistically related ethnic groups Gurensi Tallensi and Nabdam For all three groups the primary socio cultural unit is the traditional homestead or compound yiri The Frafra practice subsistence farming based on the permanent cultivation of

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/10 (2016-02-13)
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  • Art and Death in A Yoruba Community, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Art in Social Context Islam and Islamic Arts in Africa Komo among Tagwa Senufo Peoples in Southwest Burkina Faso Kuba Art and Rule Life in the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Art and Death in A Yoruba Community by Norma Wolff Professor Emerita Iowa State University Yoruba peoples Nigeria egungun masquerade Photo by Norma Wolff The egungun festival in the Itoko area of Abeokuta occurs at the end of the dry season and lasts seven days The festival celebrates the ancestors and their moral authority On the night before the festival members of the egungun society gather in the sacred

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/24 (2016-02-13)
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